CFPR: SG LEADS Home

Singapore Longitudinal EArly Development Study (SG LEADS)

 

Latest Updates

22 June 2020 | Women Take on More Childcare, even when in Full-time Work | The Straits Times

While 72% of Singaporean mothers with young children are working full time, they are still taking on a lion’s share of the childcare duties than men. CFPR Founding Director Prof Jean Yeung shares new research findings from the Singapore Longitudinal Early Development Study (SG LEADS) on women taking on a "second shift" at home after work, and encourages more fathers to be involved in childcare activities.

 

 

21 May 2020 | Covid-19 Can Widen Gaps in Children's Development | The Straits Times

Insights from the Singapore Longitudinal EArly Development Study (SG LEADS) suggest that Covid-19 can exacerbate socio-economic inequalities, widening gaps in children's health, socio-emotional and cognitive development. CFPR Director Prof Jean Yeung sheds light on this and suggests interventions to contain and mitigate the impact of Covid-19 on widening development gaps among Singaporean children.

 

 

April 2020 | Research Update

We have completed our first wave of data collection with 5,021 children under the age of 7, from 3,485 households located in all regions of the nation.

We would like to share with you some preliminary findings from the study. This first report gives you a sense of the profiles of the study sample, which represents children of all races, and socioeconomic statuses who live in many communities across the nation.

Issue 1   

 

 

December 2019 | Wave 1 Data Collection Completed!

Data collection for Wave 1 of the SG LEADS Core Panel Survey has been completed! Children and primary caregivers from all over Singapore have been interviewed, and our team is working hard to analyze the data.


SG LEADS PANEL SURVEY: VISUAL MAP OF COMPLETED SAMPLE'S GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION

 

 


 

 

Project Details

Funded by The Ministry of Education Social Science Research Thematic Grant (MOE2016 – SSRTG – 044)

Amount: S$8,479,995

Project duration: June 2017 to May 2021

PI: Prof Wei-Jun Jean Yeung, Provost's Chair Professor, Sociology Dept, CFPR Founding Director and ARI Research Leader of Changing Family in Asia Cluster, NUS

Co-PIs: A/P Chia Ngee Choon (Economics), Dr Ding Xiaopan (Psychology), Dr Ryan Hong (Psychology), A/P Shirlena Huang (Geography), Prof Lim Sun Sun (SUTD), A/P Jessica Pan (Economics), A/P Leher Singh (Psychology), A/P Walter Theseira (SUSS), Prof Brenda Yeoh (Geography), Dr Rongjun Yu (Psychology)


This project examines human development in Singapore by using innovative methods to understand factors that can promote Singaporean children’s early childhood development, and provide input that can help address these factors. The main research questions are on the state of Singaporean children; how family, childcare and early education institutions, community, and state interact to shape the development of Singapore’s children; and, how these investments affect intergenerational mobility and social stratification in Singapore.


 

 


Study Design

 

Core Panel Survey

Led By: Professor Wei-Jun Jean Yeung

Co-PIs: Dr. Ding Xiaopan, A/P Ryan Hong, Professor Lim Sun Sun

The core national survey will be a 2-wave panel study of 5,000 children aged 0 to 6 and will assess children’s motor, social-emotional, language and cognitive skills, health, and factors that potentially shape the multiple domains of child development. The respondents will be selected from a nationally representative probability sample of Singapore resident households that have at least one child under the age of 7, with an oversample of the disadvantaged population. The first wave of the national survey will start in 2018 while the 2nd wave will be in 2020.

 

 

The study will focus on the cultural background, early childcare and preschool, time use, technology use, financial and non-monetary investment in children, mother, father and extended family’s roles, family stress, program participation, and community context.

 

Subprojects

(1) Early Childhood Language Skills Development

Led By: Associate Professor Leher Singh

Focus: A laboratory experiment of early childhood linguistic development with a special interest in the effects of different multilingual environments for later social, cognitive and language development of children.This study will be using a subset of the sample from the Core National Panel Survey.

(2) Improving Children’s Social Skills

Led By: Assistant Professor Rongjun Yu

Focus: An intervention project that trains children’s minds to build social-emotional skills such as cooperation, empathy, self-control, and identify neural correlates of social cognition and decisionmaking for children.This study will be using a subset of the sample from the Core National Panel Survey.

(3) Ethnographic Study on Children Growing Up in Cross-Cultural Families

Led By: Professor Brenda Yeoh and Associate Professor Huang Swee Lian, Shirlena

Focus: An ethnographic study focusing on the consequences of cross-cultural low-income family environments for family functioning and child development in terms of sociopsychological well-being, early childhood experience and health. This study will be using a subset of the sample from the Core National Panel Survey.

(4) Improving Preschool Attendance

Led By: Associate Professor Jessica Pan and Associate Professor Walter Theseira

Focus: A randomized control trial (RCT) that evaluates the effectiveness of various incentives at improving preschool attendance rates for disadvantaged children, by motivating parents to commit their children to regular attendance.

(5) Asset Building Early in Life and Matched Savings

Led By: Associate Professor Chia Ngee Choon

Focus: An assessment of saving attitudes and behaviours of families, and evaluation of the impact of asset-building from matched savings programs on children’s development.

 

Principal Investigator

Wei-Jun Jean YEUNGNational University of Singapore

 

Core Panel Survey

Wei-Jun Jean YEUNGPrincipal Investigator
National University of Singapore

DING XiaopanCo-Principal Investigator
National University of Singapore

Ryan HONGCo-Principal Investigator
National University of Singapore

LIM Sun SunCo-Principal Investigator
Singapore University of Technology and Design

PASARABA Lori Jane (Gi)Research Associate/ Research Manager

CHEN LuxiPostdoctoral Fellow

CHEN XuejiaoPostdoctoral Fellow

LEE Yan SongResearch Assistant

Joyous TANResearch Assistant

 

Language Skills Subproject

Leher SINGHPrincipal Investigator
National University of Singapore

HO Yi XuanResearch Assistant

 

Social Skills Subproject

YU RongjunPrincipal Investigator
National University of Singapore

Elizabeth KIMPostdoctoral Fellow

Nastassja L. FISCHERResearch Assistant

 

Cross-cultural Families Subproject

Brenda YEOHCo-Principal Investigator
National University of Singapore

Shirlena HUANGCo-Principal Investigator
National University of Singapore

Bernice LOHPostdoctoral Fellow

Olivia GOH Mei HuiResearch Associate

 

Pre-school Attendance Subproject

Jessica PANCo-Principal Investigator
National University of Singapore

Walter THESEIRACo-Principal Investigator
Singapore University of Social Sciences

OH Hui XianResearch Assistant

 

Asset Building Subproject

CHIA Ngee ChoonCo-Principal Investigator
National University of Singapore

 

SG LEADS Research Scholars

LIM Kia YeeDepartment of Economics

Shuya LUDepartment of Sociology

Nawal Binti MOHAMED HASHIMDepartment of Psychology

 

International Advisory Board

The Singapore Longitudinal Early Development Study (SG LEADS) is advised by a distinguished panel of international scholars who have extensive experiences in longitudinal studies and early childhood development research.


Janeen BAXTERThe University of Queensland

Jeanne BROOKS-GUNNColumbia University

Pamela DAVIS-KEANUniversity of Michigan

Greg DUNCANUniversity of California, Irvine

Sandra L. HOFFERTHUniversity of Maryland

James M. LEPKOWSKIUniversity of Michigan

Narayan SASTRYUniversity of Michigan

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Reports

Thank you for being a part of the Singapore Longitudinal EArly Development Study (SG LEADS)! Because of your valuable contributions, we have completed our first wave of data collection with 5,021 children under the age of 7, from 3,485 households located in all regions of the nation.

We would like to share with you some preliminary findings from the study. We plan to send you findings from time to time.

For us to send you more findings, we ask that you update your contact information, in particular, your address if you have moved and your email address so we can send you the latest updates without delay. You can email us at sg_leads@nus.edu.sg.

 

 

Issue 1 | April 2020

 

 

 

News

22 June 2020 | Women Take on More Childcare, even when in Full-time Work | The Straits Times

While 72% of Singaporean mothers with young children are working full time, they are still taking on a lion’s share of the childcare duties than men. CFPR Founding Director Prof Jean Yeung shares new research findings from the Singapore Longitudinal Early Development Study (SG LEADS) on women taking on a "second shift" at home after work, and encourages more fathers to be involved in childcare activities.


 


      PHOTO CREDIT: NUS NEWS

21 May 2020 | Covid-19 Can Widen Gaps in Children's Development | The Straits Times

Insights from the Singapore Longitudinal EArly Development Study (SG LEADS) suggest that Covid-19 can exacerbate socio-economic inequalities, widening gaps in children's health, socio-emotional and cognitive development. CFPR Founding Director Prof Jean Yeung sheds light on this and suggests interventions to contain and mitigate the impact of Covid-19 on widening development gaps among Singaporean children.


 


      PHOTO CREDIT: NUS FB PAGE

5 April 2019 | Centre for Family and Population Research celebrates 5th anniversary | The Straits Times

CFPR celebrated its fifth anniversary on 5 April, with Minister for Social and Family Development Desmond Lee, as Guest-of-honour.


 


17 October 2018 | Reducing Inequality with Early Childhood Development | The Straits Times

Experiences early in life have profound and enduring influences on an individual's developing brain, social behaviour and health. A family's economic resources shape the nature of many of these experiences - yet, the extent to which they affect children's development remains debated among scholars. CFPR Director Prof Jean Yeung talks about the study titled Singapore Longitudinal EArly Development Study (SG LEADS) housed at CFPR, NUS which aims to shed more light on this matter.


 


7 October 2018 | Understanding Singapore Children’s Early Development | Lianhe Zaobao

For our Children's Day weekend this October, CFPR Director Prof Jean Yeung shares with us the need to gain better understanding of the multifaceted issues affecting children's early development, especially in the face of low fertility and an aging population. She also shares about the Singapore Longitudinal EArly Development Study (SG LEADS); her current research project focused on young children.


 

Frequently Asked Questions

1. Who is leading this project?

The SG LEADS project is led by Principal Investigator Professor Wei-Jun Jean Yeung and a team of multidisciplinary Co-PIs (see People tab).

2. Who is sponsoring this project?

The Singapore Longitudinal EArly Development Study (SG LEADS) is funded by the Ministry of Education Social Science Research Thematic Grant (MOE 2016 – SSRTG – 044).

3. When was Wave 1 of the SG LEADS Core National Survey conducted?

Wave 1 of the Core National Survey was conducted from 2018-2019.

4. What is the Core National Survey sample?

The Singapore Longitudinal Early Development Study (SG LEADS) was conducted with a nationally representative sample of 5,021 Singaporean children under 7, and their primary caregivers from 3,485 households across the nation. Children from all socio-economic statuses and racial groups were properly represented in this survey.

5. How was the Core National Survey conducted?

We conducted computer-assisted personal interviews (CAPI) with each primary caregiver at the child’s home, and also included cognitive assessments for children age 3 and above.

6. What questions are asked in the Core Panel Survey?

The interview covers a wide range of topics, as we assessed motor, social-emotional, linguistic, cognitive, and health well-being, as well as factors that potentially shape child’s well-being, child development and family resilience, such as early childcare arrangements, preschool attendance, time and technology use, financial and non-monetary investment in children, mother and father’s roles, and family stress.
Our survey also includes a pen-and-paper cognitive assessment conducted with each child.

 

Contact Us

Email: sg_leads@nus.edu.sg

Address:
c/o SG LEADS Research Team
Centre for Family and Population Research
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
National University of Singapore
The Shaw Foundation Building
Block AS7, Level 3, 5 Arts Link
Singapore 117570

Professor Jean Yeung (Principal Investigator)
Email: socywj@nus.edu.sg
Telephone: +65 65163471

Gi Pasaraba (Research Manager)
Email: faspljm@nus.edu.sg
Telephone: +65 66014959

For interview scheduling, please contact appointed survey research firm Nexus Link Pte Ltd:
Email: sg_leads@nexus-link.biz
Telephone: +65 88698781

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