Publications


The Centre has been active in research publications since it was established in Year 2001. Our publications include books and journals on foreign language teaching.

The list of books which the Centre has published can be viewed at: http://www.fas.nus.edu.sg/cls/publications/books-by-cls.htm

If you would like to purchase the Centre’s conference books, please contact De Gruyter Mouton.

The list of journals which our Centre publishes can be found at: http://www.fas.nus.edu.sg/cls/publications/cls-working-papers.htm

The Centre's online journal “e-FLT - Electronic Journal of Foreign Language Teaching” can be found at: http://www.fas.nus.edu.sg/cls/publications/e-flt-journal.htm

CLS Working Papers


Enabling Greater Individualization and Process-oriented Learning through the Medium of Internet

Assoc Prof Chan, Wai Meng, Kim Dong-Ha.

Date: Nov 2002
Author: Chan, Wai Meng, Kim Dong-Ha.

Abstract:
Research in cognitive psychology and second language learning has underlined the significance of the learners' cognitive processes and individual preferences in language learning. Helping learners to be aware of these processes and preferences has in fact become an important methodological principle of language teaching. Advances in information and communication technologies (ICT) have made it possible to offer a wide range of interactive language exercises and self-access learning materials in Internet. This paper will provide a brief description of "e- daf ", the Virtual Self-access Centre for German as a Foreign Language at the National University of Singapore, its objectives and structure. Using selected examples of interactive exercises and resources from "e- daf ", it will introduce five essential design principles and explain how these principles can be applied to enable greater individualization and process-orientation with the ultimate aim of promoting autonomous learning.

Project-based Learning in Indonesian Instruction - Why and How?

Ms Istanto, Johanna Wulansari

Date: Dec 2002
Author: Istanto, Johanna Wulansari

Abstract:
Project-based learning has gained prevalence in the education field for its role in inducing salient learning. The Indonesian program at the NUS has implemented project-based learning at different proficiency levels of instruction from elementary to advanced. In this paper, I will discuss and demonstrate how project-based activities can be an effective mode of language learning based on the following perspectives: 1) project-based learning as a form of experiential learning; 2) project-based learning as a form of collaborative learning. Some positive outcomes in the cognitive and affective domains which were exhibited during the process will also be discussed.

The Reflective teacher and curricular innovations - on the need to foster reflective teaching, metacognitive competence and teacher autonomy in language teacher education.

Assoc Prof Chan, Wai Meng

Date: Dec 2002
Author: Assoc Prof Chan, Wai Men

Abstract:
Attempts to implement innovative language learning curricula (e.g. with learning strategy instruction or to foster learner autonomy) have frequently met with resistance not only from learners, but from teachers as well. Indeed, the success of curricular innovations hinges largely on the ability and willingness of teachers, who represent vital agents of change, to implement the innovations and to achieve greater acceptance among learners. This paper argues that conflicts arising from differences in the principles of a particular innovation and the individual teacher's beliefs and attitudes (or, in J. Wagner's words, "E-knots") must be resolved to ensure the success of the innovation. For this reason, the reflective teacher is an essential pre-requisite of any curricular innovation. The paper will further seek to explain why a positive disposition towards as well as the ability to carry out reflective teaching is largely a function of the teacher's metacognitive competence. Having established this, the author will provide a brief survey of literature covering recent efforts in teacher education to foster reflective teaching and discuss how student teachers can be given the opportunity to experience at first-hand the very same innovations they are later expected to put into practice.

Interactive Multimedia Courseware for Bahasa Indonesia

Ms Loe, Nie Fong Fanny

Date: April 2003
Author: Loe, Nie Fong Fanny

Abstract:
The development of computer technology and advances in WWW technology has constantly opened new doors for language teaching, enabling the visual display of language exercises on the screen complete with a multimedia soundtrack. The NUS Bahasa Indonesia team has developed an online interactive self-correcting courseware that provides comprehensible input for the basic level of Indonesian.In this paper, the author will elaborate on the “Bahasa Indonesia Programme”, an Interactive Multimedia Courseware for the Indonesian language, focusing on its objectives and progress. The paper will also explain how the courseware is applied beyond classroom interaction and its relation to the tutorial learning activities in the classroom. The paper will provide some examples of the interactive exercise worksheets available. Judging by student feedback, these motivate and enhance students' learning experiences.To conclude, the author will describe briefly the benefits of multimedia and the limitations of using the computer as a tool in language teaching, and ways in which a computer can help provide input for the learner.

The Difficulties Singapore English-educated Adults Face in Learning Mandarin

Assoc Prof Chin, Kwee Nyet

Date: July 2003
Author: Assoc Prof Chin, Kwee Nyet

Abstract:
Two approaches are used in this study. One is through conducting surveys on Singapore Chinese of age 30 and above who had received English education. They are asked to appraise their educational background and the difficulties they may face while learning Chinese. They are also required to give a self-assessment of their abilities in learning Chinese. The other approach is through using both socio-linguistic and social-cognitive language theories. The theories are applied to analyze both their psychological dilemmas and the actual difficulties in the process of language learning. Using Vygotsky's socio-cognitive theories, we can explain why Chinese syntax and semantics have become two major obstacles for English-educated Adult Singaporeans. The key problem is that they have built up an inner speech based on English when they were at an age that was optimal for language acquisition. The results of this survey attest to this by showing that more than 60 percent of them could only construct thoughts in English, even though they understood that they were using Chinese. As they instinctively engage English syntax and semantics in their thoughts, their efforts in learning Chinese are often hampered by structural mistakes and a poor understanding of Chinese word usage.

Linguistic Thinking and Language Learning: The Case of Japanese Kanji

Toshiko Yamaguchi

Date: July 2003
Author: Toshiko Yamaguchi

Abstract:
Our shared teaching philosophy in the context of higher education might be to challenge students to think about what they are learning. This paper stresses the relevance of thinking skills while students learn a foreign language such as Japanese, and seeks to explain, though tentatively, how linguistic thinking helps to make the learning process successful. Taking kanji or logographic scripts as illustrative examples, I claim that the key to establishing this teaching methodology is, first and foremost, the awareness of linguistic knowledge (e.g. categorization of compounds) in a target language. The paper also argues that problem-based learning may not be an appropriate medium in language learning.

The contradiction of IT and the learning of Chinese Language

Assoc Prof Chin, Kwee Nyet, Chan Sai Hoon

Date: July 2003
Author: Chin, Kwee Nyet, Chan Sai Hoon

Abstract:
Information Technology is widely used in the teaching of Chinese language in Singapore secondary schools in Singapore now. This paper discusses a typical learning problem of elementary Chinese Language learners. Most of these learners have the problem of not being able to read and write proficiently. But the question is: is IT-based teaching the solution to their problem? No doubt that IT is a powerful teaching tool but where elementary Chinese Language learners are concerned, IT does not enhance the learning of Chinese Language. Usually, the goal of IT-based teaching in Chinese Language is to enrich students or to inspire their interests in the learning of Chinese Language. However, in a pedagogical sense, learning a language requires the cognitive development of students, specifically their logical thinking. As IT-based teaching uses more visual stimuli, it enhances the affective rather than the cognitive development of students. Because of this contradiction, IT-based teaching does not request a solution to the student's learning problem.

About the Authors:
Chin Kwee Nyet received her M.A. and Dr. Phil. degrees in modern Chinese literature from the National University of Singapore and University of Hong Kong respectively. She is currently Convenor of Chinese Language Programme of the Centre for Language Studies. She taught Chinese language and literature at NUS from 1997 to 2001 as a part-time lecturer, and joined the NUS as full-time lecturer in 2001. Besides teaching, she is involved in development of the curricula for the Intensive Mandarin Programme and Chinese language modules for undergraduates. Her research currently focuses on the teaching of Chinese as second language and IT in Chinese language education.
Chan Sai Hoon received his M.A. degree from National University of Singapore. He is currently a teacher teaching Chinese Language in a Secondary School in Singapore. He has edited a book “Social History of Singapore” with Radio Singapore International. He has also published a paper on the significance of imagery in Si-Fu poetry of the Wei-Jin Period in the Chinese Monthly Cultural Journal. His current research focus is on curriculum planning and the use of IT in teaching Chinese language.

Integrating Skills in Thai Language Teaching

Ms Klayklueng, Sasiwimol

Date: August 2003
Author: Klayklueng, Sasiwimol

Abstract:
This paper is based on a description and investigation of some of the author's experiences in integrating language skills with meaningful contexts in Thai language courses. It mainly seeks to discuss the following perspectives:
  • Incorporating meaningful and interesting contents or situations into integrated skills enhance comprehension and acquisition of new language structures or patterns.
  • Employing authentic materials in classroom activities provides a purposeful context for the learning of language skills.
  • Approaches which are carefully planned allow teachers to use strategies that are optimal for promoting foreign language development and proficiency.

Interpretative Puzzles: The Vietnamese language used in the homeland and among the Vietnamese community overseas

Nguyen Bich Thuan

Date: September 2003
Author: Nguyen Bich Thuan

Abstract:
This paper studies the reasons for the linguistic differences between the Vietnamese spoken in Vietnam and the Vietnamese spoken by Vietnamese overseas, in particular in Australia. While the latter still uses the forms of languages known to them before the 1975 Vietnamese diaspora; back home, the spoken language has taken many different twists and turns to become what it is today: a vernacular that puzzles many Vietnamese overseas.

Providing a Multimedia Network-Based Platform for the Development of Foreign Language Conversational Ability

Assoc Prof Chan, Wai Meng

Date: November 2003
Author: Chan, Wai Meng

Abstract:
This paper reports on a CALL development project of the German language programme at the National University of Singapore which seeks to marry the specific advantages of a computer network with that of multimedia technologies. The objective of the "Movie Studio" project was to create a motivating network-based platform for the production of dialogues in simulated situations, in written and in spoken form. Much like e-cards, which are fast gaining popularity among Internet users, the 'DIY' movies created by the learners can be viewed by designated viewers who will be informed by e-mails. The presenter will show that, in this project, the design of this application and its technical realisation were very much driven by relevant theories from the fields of second language acquisition, language education, CALL and multimedia learning as well as acknowledged principles in general education, rather than by technology per se. Besides the theoretical considerations and educational principles behind its design, the paper will also provide an account of the background and objectives of the "Movie Studio" project, a brief history of its development, the various functions and learning support available to the learners, and some possibilities for integrating it into the language curriculum.

Interactive Situation Simulation: Applying Internet and Multimedia Technologies to Situation-based Foreign Language Learning

Mrs Chen Ing Ru, Kim Dong-Ha

Date: November 2004
Author: Chen Ing Ru, Kim Dong-Ha

Abstract:
Internet and multimedia technologies play an increasingly significant role not only in our daily life but in education as well. Similarly, in the field of foreign language teaching and learning, such technologies can be effective tools. Learning with Internet and multimedia provides opportunities for differentiating between learners of differing abilities and allows for greater individualisation. Pedagogically well-designed applications can provide learners with prompt and meaningful feedback, various forms of tutorial help and cognitive stimuli.
This paper will report on the project “Interactive Situation Simulation (ISS)” to create a multimedia web-based application for conversational practice and vocabulary learning, which has been made available in “e-daf” (http://courseware.nus.edu.sg/e-daf), the course website of the German Program at Centre for Language Studies of the National University of Singapore (NUS). Using selected examples, it will show how this application enables greater differentiation and individualisation of learning. The theoretical foundation of this application, including some approaches to language teaching, will also be discussed.

The Various and Innovative Representation of Mandarin Lexicons --- An Observation based on Sampling of Taiwan's Newspapers

Ms Lin, Chiung Yao

Date: November 2005
Author: Ms Lin, Chiung Yao

Abstract:
The research aims to establish the relationship of the fast changing social-political status after the lifting of newspaper ban in Taiwan and the usages of Mandarin lexicons. Through sampling of two most established newspapers in Taiwan, applying content analysis and socialist Emile Durkheim's social reality theory, the paper found that Mandarin in Taiwan are relatively more creative and experimental after 1988. Which in turn, explained the regional characteristics of Mandarin words and phrases in Taiwan as compared to the rest of the Mandarin speaking societies. With an attempt to categorize, this paper observed and identified 6 main areas of the uniqueness of Taiwan's Mandarin words and phrases usage.

Reading and Chinese Language Acquisition of Singapore Preschoolers Comments on Chinese Reading Materials for Preschoolers

Dr Cheong, Lee Peng

Date: November 2005
Author: Cheong, Lee Peng

Abstract:
Because of increased emphasis on the role of parents and educators in helping children learn to read Chinese , this paper will be a valuable attempt for educators and parents sourcing Chinese literacy programs material. After introducing and collaborating much-needed theoretical perspectives on Chinese related literacy from Western Countries and China , the paper examines two of the literacy programme material available limitedly in Singapore.

Towards Common Goals in Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: A Proposed Framework Syllabus for the CLS

Teaching Development Committee

Date: January 2007
Author: Teaching Development Committee

Abstract:
Due to the need for a common orientation and direction in the teaching of foreign languages in teh Centre for Language Studies, a committee comprising experienced teaching staff within the centre was set up. Its main objective was to dicuss and propose a general framework syllabus which could serve as a basic reference document for language teachers for the teaching.
This framework syllabus is drawn up to provide guidelines for the design of syllabi and the development of curricula in teh various language programmes in the CLS, and for teachers in planning and conducting lessons. It is also intended to inform readers of the approach which the Centre has chosen to realise its pedagogical objectives.

Foreign Language Learning in a Multicultural Setting – With a Special Focus on the Korean Language Programme at the National University of Singapore

Assoc Prof Chan, Wai Meng, Ms Chi, Seo Won

Date: July 2008
Author: Chan, Wai Meng, Chi, Seo Won

Abstract:
It is natural for a multicultural nation like Singapore to have a multlingual language policy with Malay, Chinese (Mandarin), English and Tamil as its four official languages. However the decision to make multilingualism the cornerstone of its language policy and the eventual choice of official languages were not necessarily the results of a bottom-up development determined by the ethnic and ethnolinguistic make-up of its population. Instead this policy was shaped at least as much by top-down processes which reflect Singapore 's national objectives. The same pragmatism is behind the Ministry of Education's bilingual language-in-education policy and third/foreign language programmes. This paper will begin by providing the historical and pragmatic background of its multilingual language and bilingual language-in-education policies. It will then describe and discuss the introduction and development of foreign language programmes in secondary and tertiary education in Singapore as well as the intended objectives behind these programmes. In its latter sections, it will look at recent trends in the teaching and learning of Korean in Singapore , which has thus far hardly been studied or documented scientifically, and present some anecdotal evidence and limited survey data on learners' goals in learning this language. This will be rounded off with a brief description of the newly established Korean language progamme at the National University of Singapore, and its objectives and intended outcomes.

Learning Malay in the Global Classroom: Mirroring Social Progress

Mr Sew, Jyh Wee

Date: July 2008
Author: Sew, Jyh Wee

Abstract:
In the age of globalisation Malay learning should be useful for new possibilities. A robust Malay lexicon that contains the vocabulary of modern and futuristic references not only prepares the speaker to function with currency but enables the learner to interact intelligently in a global world of rapid knowledge making. The repertoire of the evolving Malay society replaces the peripherals of a collective memory of ancient cultural artifact that the native speakers are fast leaving behind. Interesting terms of Malay artifacts such as stone pestle (antan), rattan sieve (nyiru), for example, escape even the remote farming family of Mat Isa in TIVI (television), a novel by Shahnon Ahmad. This paper suggests for a current outlook in learning Malay in line with the spirit of knowledge economy, incorporating the recent National Day Speech Rally by the Prime Minister of Singapore in 2007 that favors the acquisition of Malay as a third language in school. The discussion includes the linguistic bipartite of the synoptic and iterative forces performed by a language that result in the development of grammatical taxonomies, for example, tense and aspect to fully describe time (Halliday 2000: 231). Along the vein of iterative usage this discussion emphasizes on the need for Malay learning to be in sync with the relevance of current time.

Introduction and Stylesheets


Editorial Committee

Chan Wai Meng, Chin Kwee Nyet, Titima Suthiwan

Objectives of the CLS Working Paper Series

  • The CLS working paper series represents a means of encouraging faculty members to actively engage in research and scholarship in areas relevant to the teaching and research objectives of the CLS.
  • It provides faculty members with the opportunity to publicize their ongoing research and writing projects to their peers both within and beyond the university.
  • It allows faculty members to distribute working versions of their current papers or writing projects to solicit constructive feedback and suggestions prior to a conference presentation, publication or submission to a journal.

Contributors

Contributors are expected to be members of the CLS faculty. Especially the more junior academic staff are strongly encouraged to make use of the working paper series to develop their scholarship. Visiting faculty and scholars from external institutions presenting seminars at the CLS are also welcome to publish papers under the CLS working paper series.

Scope

In the main, contributions should focus on theoretical and/or applied research in the area of second and foreign language teaching and learning. Papers on related disciplines such as psychology, language acquisition, linguistics and literature may also be accepted, especially where their impact on language teaching and learning is evident.

Submission of Papers

Contributors should submit soft and hard copies of their manuscripts, an abstract (100-150 words) and their biodata (30-40 words) to the Editorial Committee. The manuscripts should be formatted according to the guidelines listed in the next section "Style Sheet for Manuscripts". Papers may be in English or any one of the following languages: Bahasa Indonesia, Chinese (Mandarin), French, German, Japanese, Malay, Tamil, Thai and Vietnamese. For papers written in a language other than English, the Editorial Committee reserves the right to appoint a guest editor.

Style Sheet for Manuscripts

All contributions are to be typed using a word processor (MS Word documents preferred). Pages should have a line space of 1.5 lines and a left margin of 3 cm. All other margins are to be set at 2.5 cm. Text should be typed using the font Times New Roman, 12 pt. Headings and sub-headings should be in bold lettering in Times New Roman, 13 pt. For quotations and references, please follow the APA (American Psychological Association) Style. Please refer to the following: American Psychological Association. (2001). Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (5th ed.). Washington, D.C: Author

Footnotes should be used instead of endnotes.

Examples for quotations and references:

Direct Quotations

Wagner (1988) believes that "individuals with contradictory imperatives are frustrated and not open to change" (p. 113).

As Wagner puts it: "Individuals with contradictory imperatives feel powerless, they are frustrated and not open to change." (1988, p. 113)

However, when a quote exceeds 40 words, it has to be specially indented like this:

Reflection is a process, both individual and collaborative, involving experience and uncertainty. It is comprised of identifying questions and key elements of a matter that has emerged as significant, then taking one's thoughts into dialogue with oneself and with others. Through reflection, one reaches newfound clarity, on which one bases changes in action or disposition. (Jay/Jonhson 2002, p. 76)

Summary or Paraphrase

Wagner (1988) refers to such contradictions arising from differences between a teacher's beliefs and the imperatives of an innovation as E-knots.

Contradictions arising from differences between a teacher's beliefs and the imperatives of an innovation can severly hamper the implementation of the innovation (Wagner, 1988).

References

Books

O' Malley, J.M. & Chamot, A.U. (1990). Learning Strategies in Second Language Acquisition . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Ridley, J. (1997). Developing learners' thinking skills . Dublin: Authentik.

United Nations. (1998). World Investment Report 1998: Trends and Determinants . New York and Geneva: United Nations.

Book Chapters

Breen, M.P. & Mann, S.J. (1997). Shooting arrows at the sun: Perspectives on a pedagogy for autonomy. In P. Benson & P. Voller (Eds.), Autonomy and independence in language learning (pp. 132-149). New York: Longman.

Conference Papers

Lanktree, C. & Briere, J. (1991, January). Earlydata on the trauma symptom checklist for children . Paper presented at the meeting of the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children, San Diego, USA.

Journal Articles

Wagner, J. (1988). Innovation in foreign language teaching. AILA Review 5 , 99-117.

Magazine Articles

Underwood, A. (1999, April 26). Chemo in Question. Newsweek , p. 4.

Newspaper Articles

Singlish ‘a handicap we do not wish on S'poreans'. (1999, August 15). The Sunday Times , p. 26.

Articles on the World Wide Web

Anders, P. (2000, May 19). The Ultimate Website [On-line].

Available: http://www.anders.com

e-FLT Journal


e-FLT - Electronic Journal of Foreign Language Teaching

e-FLT, or the Electronic Journal for Foreign Language Teaching, is a peer-reviewed journal published by our Centre with the aim of disseminating scholarly information on research and development in Second and Foreign Language Teaching and Learning. It publishes articles and book reviews in English as well as in any of the nine languages taught in our Centre, namely Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Indonesian, Malay, Tamil, Thai and Vietnamese. Its multilingual platform is a unique feature that will broaden its scope and allow it to reach out to academics, researchers, practitioners, and other professionals specializing in various languages. will appear twice a year, in June and December. It is published electronically in the Internet to allow it to reach a wider audience in Asia and the rest of the world, while keeping production costs to a minimum, making it possible to grant free access to all.

After its successful launch on 1 Dec 2004, e-FLT now moves into its fourth year. Volume 5, Number 1 of this online journal has appeared (date of publication: 1 June 2008). We would like to invite you and your colleagues to visit the journal's website and read the articles and reviews in the new issue. We would like to encourage you to register as a subscriber. Subscription is free, and all subscribers will be kept informed of the latest events, including the publication of the latest issues of the journal. Subscribers will also be entitled to participate in the journal's electronic forums.

Visit e-FLT
Download the e-FLT Brochure

Call for Manuscripts

e-FLT invites manuscripts in English, Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Indonesian, Malay, Tamil, Thai or Vietnamese on research, development or practice in Second and Foreign Language Teaching and Learning for its two issues in June and December 2005. Detailed submission information (scope, length, format, review procedure etc.) can be accessed on our website. Wherever possible, manuscripts are to be sent by e-mail as MS Word documents or in Rich Text format to the Editor, e-FLT, at e-flt@nus.edu.sg

Books by Staff


From Face to Screen: Interative Multimodal Semiotics at Work

Mr Sew, Jyh Wee

Abstract:

This book explores the factors that lead to productive social engagements. Showing empathy to the cultural semiotics of the other speaker results in a successful social interaction. An impressive speaker is a culturally empathic social actor, who pays attention to the speech styles of the other interlocutors. To yield maximal learning outcome, a language teacher may tap the digital proclivity of young learners by incorporating blogging as the e-learning component in foreign language pedagogy. Realignment of delivery to be in sync with the learners’ commonplace digital practice represents a culturally intelligent social mimicry in foreign language education.

Metakognition und der DaF-Unterricht für asiatische Lerner. Möglichkeiten und Grenzen

Assoc Prof Chan, Wai Meng

Abstract:
It is a common observation that effective learners are more flexible and systematic in their strategy use and that they reflect regularly on their learning – signs of a well-regulated metacognition. To explain this, the author constructs a comprehensive model of metacognition in foreign language learning. He further argues that the learner's metacognitive development is a pre-requisite for learner autonomy. Contextual factors impact on the beliefs and attitudes of teachers and learners. The author reports on an empirical study investigating the effects of the latter on the implementation of a new German language curriculum in Singapore that promotes learner autonomy and suggests that improving the metacognition of the teachers and learners may provide the answer to such negative factors. Abstract of Book in German entitled "Metakognition und der DaF-Unterricht für asiatische Lerner. Möglichkeiten und Grenzen" (392pp.) (English translation: "Metacognition and German as a Foreign Language for Asian Learners. Possibilities and Limitations") Not only effective language learners are capable of employiong strategies while learning. However, teachers have often observed that effective learners are usually more flexible and systematic in their use of strategies and that they reflect more regularly on their own learning. These are signs of a well-developed metacognition. To explain this link, the author presents a comprehensive thepretical model of metacognition and foreign language learning. The book will also attempt to explain why the metacognitive development of the learner can be considered to be a necessary foundation for greater learner autonomy. The context of learning can have an immense impact on the curriculum of school education as well as the attitudes and beliefs of both teachers and learners. Using the German as a Foreign Language lessons for secondary pupils in the Asian state of Singapore as an example, the author attempts to show how contextual factors can in fact seriously hamper the implementation of a foreign language syllabus that aims at encouraging greater processorientation and learner autonomy. To overcome such obstacles, he proposes that greater efforts be put into the learners' metacognitive development and puts forward some practical ideas to achieve this. Abstract of Book entitled "German Language Syllabus (with Teaching Guidelines) for Secondary 1-4" (83 pp.) German Language was first introduced as a secondary school subject in Singapore in 1980. The first formal syllabus, written seven years later in 1987 and based on the communicative approach to language teaching, was considered then to be 'modern' and 'progressive'. However, in view of rapid developments in research into the areas of learner autonomy and learner strategies as well as the Singapore's new educational goals for the 21st Century, there was, by 1996, an urgent need to redevelop the syllabus. In this new syllabus, greater emphasis is placed on autonomous learning and procedural competence. The new syllabus does not merely contain sample lists of the proficiencies, topic areas and grammar items included in the German syllabus for the secondary level. It actually provides teachers and curriculum developers with an introduction to the theoretical foundations of the new syllabus and a justification of its principles and recommendations. To do so, it draws upon the latest relevant findings from related research disciplines.

Centenaires de Pelléas

Dr Philippe Martin-Lau

Abstract:
It is a common observation that effective learners are more flexible and systematic in their strategy use and that they reflect regularly on their learning – signs of a well-regulated metacognition. To explain this, the author constructs a comprehensive model of metacognition in foreign language learning. He further argues that the learner's metacognitive development is a pre-requisite for learner autonomy. Contextual factors impact on the beliefs and attitudes of teachers and learners. The author reports on an empirical study investigating the effects of the latter on the implementation of a new German language curriculum in Singapore that promotes learner autonomy and suggests that improving the metacognition of the teachers and learners may provide the answer to such negative factors.

Abstract of Book in German entitled "Metakognition und der DaF-Unterricht für asiatische Lerner. Möglichkeiten und Grenzen" (392pp.) (English translation: "Metacognition and German as a Foreign Language for Asian Learners. Possibilities and Limitations")

Not only effective language learners are capable of employiong strategies while learning. However, teachers have often observed that effective learners are usually more flexible and systematic in their use of strategies and that they reflect more regularly on their own learning. These are signs of a well-developed metacognition. To explain this link, the author presents a comprehensive thepretical model of metacognition and foreign language learning. The book will also attempt to explain why the metacognitive development of the learner can be considered to be a necessary foundation for greater learner autonomy. The context of learning can have an immense impact on the curriculum of school education as well as the attitudes and beliefs of both teachers and learners. Using the German as a Foreign Language lessons for secondary pupils in the Asian state of Singapore as an example, the author attempts to show how contextual factors can in fact seriously hamper the implementation of a foreign language syllabus that aims at encouraging greater processorientation and learner autonomy. To overcome such obstacles, he proposes that greater efforts be put into the learners' metacognitive development and puts forward some practical ideas to achieve this. Abstract of Book entitled "German Language Syllabus (with Teaching Guidelines) for Secondary 1-4" (83 pp.) German Language was first introduced as a secondary school subject in Singapore in 1980. The first formal syllabus, written seven years later in 1987 and based on the communicative approach to language teaching, was considered then to be 'modern' and 'progressive'. However, in view of rapid developments in research into the areas of learner autonomy and learner strategies as well as the Singapore's new educational goals for the 21 st Century, there was, by 1996, an urgent need to redevelop the syllabus. In this new syllabus, greater emphasis is placed on autonomous learning and procedural competence. The new syllabus does not merely contain sample lists of the proficiencies, topic areas and grammar items included in the German syllabus for the secondary level. It actually provides teachers and curriculum developers with an introduction to the theoretical foundations of the new syllabus and a justification of its principles and recommendations. To do so, it draws upon the latest relevant findings from related research disciplines.

Mes Expositions universelles

Dr Philippe Martin-Lau

Abstract:
Mes Expositions universelles (1889-1900) brings together the chronicles written by Jean Lorrain on the last two World Fair Exhibitions of the Nineteenth Century. Jean Lorrain, a poet, a novelist, a dramatist, and also a well-known journalist, proposes in these chronicles not another official perspective, but a more personal approach which makes these Exhibitions seem more alive and bring them closer to a XXIst Century reader. Jean Lorrain did not worry about the political correctness, he wrote as he felt, showing his enthusiasm or expressing his dissatisfaction. Buffalo Bill, the great Japanese stage actress Sada Yacco, the Eiffel Tower , the Javanese dancers, Edward Burne-Jones, The Palace of Cochinchine are among the subjects he wrote on. Jean Lorrain Mes Expositions universelles (1889-1900) is for all kinds of public: Jean Lorrain specialists, World Fair Exhibition specialists, as well as a larger audience who will find in hundreds of notes the necessary information to appreciate this journey through time and through what could be considered the most beautiful World Fair Exhibitions of all time.

Jean Lorrain Mes Expositions universelles (1889-1900) is written in French.

Jean Lorrain Mes Expositions universelles (1889-1900). Paris: Honoré Champion, 2002, pp.436.

Jacob khon tham khanom pang

Assoc Prof Suthiwan, Titima

Karn Dernthaang khawng jacob

Assoc Prof Suthiwan, Titima

Vietnamese As Second Lanaguge. Book1

Mr Thach Ngoc Minh

Abstract:
The Vietnamese Language Textbook for Foreigner 1 and 2 (VSL 1&2) are the first and second of a series of six Vietnamese Language Textbooks written by the teachers of Department of Vietnamese Studies and Vietnamese Language for Foreigners, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, National University of HochiminhCity. These two books aim to provide a general knowledge in learning Vietnamese for foreigners who chose Vietnamese as their second tongue. The two main sections of these two books as follow:

PRONUNCIATION: It is usually the case that Vietnamese pronunciation is always an obstruction for foreigners when they start to learn Vietnamese. This is especially true for learners who their native tongue is not a tonal language. Therefore a methodically pronunciation practice is considered as a crucial step in overcome this difficulty. The pronunciation section in VSL1 provide a systematically pronunciation lessons which are arranged in a suitable order, e.g. from a simple and easy one to the more difficult. This arrangement helps learners to gain a best result in practicing the pronunciation of Vietnamese without causing boredom. After learning this section for 15 to 20 hours with the help from a teacher, learners will have a firm grasp of Vietnamese pronunciation and in particular tones and intonation.

LESSONS: This section includes 12 lessons in each VSL 1 and VSL 2 in which a number of model sentences, a number written Vietnamese Grammar points and a about 500 essential lexemes are introduced. The subject matter relates to common everyday topics that are critical to a beginning learner in learning Vietnamese as foreign language. With lively dialogues that are related to real life, pictures that illustrate the contents of each lesson, an abundance of exercise of various forms, precise and succinct notes, all prepared in the spirit of modern language teaching techniques, VSL1 and VSL2 are laid out in a suitable style and easy to understand. Through realistic dialogues attached to the everyday life, and through various exercise type accompanied by concise, simple and suitable grammar notes, the authors hope that these two textbooks will be helpful to the learners.

Vietnamese As Second Lanaguge. Book2

Mr Thach Ngoc Minh

Abstract:
The Vietnamese Language Textbook for Foreigner 1 and 2 (VSL 1&2) are the first and second of a series of six Vietnamese Language Textbooks written by the teachers of Department of Vietnamese Studies and Vietnamese Language for Foreigners, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, National University of HochiminhCity. These two books aim to provide a general knowledge in learning Vietnamese for foreigners who chose Vietnamese as their second tongue. The two main sections of these two books as follow:

PRONUNCIATION: It is usually the case that Vietnamese pronunciation is always an obstruction for foreigners when they start to learn Vietnamese. This is especially true for learners who their native tongue is not a tonal language. Therefore a methodically pronunciation practice is considered as a crucial step in overcome this difficulty. The pronunciation section in VSL1 provide a systematically pronunciation lessons which are arranged in a suitable order, e.g. from a simple and easy one to the more difficult. This arrangement helps learners to gain a best result in practicing the pronunciation of Vietnamese without causing boredom. After learning this section for 15 to 20 hours with the help from a teacher, learners will have a firm grasp of Vietnamese pronunciation and in particular tones and intonation.

LESSONS: This section includes 12 lessons in each VSL 1 and VSL 2 in which a number of model sentences, a number written Vietnamese Grammar points and a about 500 essential lexemes are introduced. The subject matter relates to common everyday topics that are critical to a beginning learner in learning Vietnamese as foreign language. With lively dialogues that are related to real life, pictures that illustrate the contents of each lesson, an abundance of exercise of various forms, precise and succinct notes, all prepared in the spirit of modern language teaching techniques, VSL1 and VSL2 are laid out in a suitable style and easy to understand. Through realistic dialogues attached to the everyday life, and through various exercise type accompanied by concise, simple and suitable grammar notes, the authors hope that these two textbooks will be helpful to the learners.

Singapore Tamil literature. Achievements and future plans

Dr Subramanian, Thinnappan

Historical perspective of Tamil literature in Singapore

Dr Subramanian, Thinnappan

Spoken Vietnamese for Beginners

Nguyen, Bich Thuan

Abstract:
This is a text for speakers of English to learn to speak and understand the Vietnamese language. It is designed for classroom use at the secondary or tertiary education level for beginners without language background and also for self study. A website based on the textbook has been developed by NIU.

http://www.seasite.niu.edu/vietnamese/VNMainpage/vietsite/vietsite.htm

Contemporary Vietnamese: An Intermediate Text

Nguyen, Bich Thuan

Abstract:
The test contains 15 chapters. Each chapter has dialogs, an elaboration on structures and exercises, and a reading component. Every fifth chapter is a review lesson.

The two-fold aim of the text is to build on an ability in general conversation and to develop skills to talk and read about particular topics. The text also seeks to further an understanding of Vietnamese society and values and aspects of cross-cultural communication through conversations and through Vietnamese writings.

Contemporary Vietnamese Readings

Nguyen, Bich Thuan

Abstract:
Accompanies Contemporary Vietnamese: An Intermediate Text.

The third in the series of texts for learning Vietnamese from NIU. Intended for intermediate students, this text includes readings on the Vietnamese land and its people; Vietnamese society and culture; current affairs; the environment; health and safety; demography and family planning; politics; economics and finance; Vietnamese literature; and Vietnamese women.

"One of the first textbooks teaching Vietnamese at an advanced level. . . . This book will undoubtedly fulfill the needs and expectations of teachers and students of Vietnamese in many countries throughout the world." - Dr. Tran thi Vinh, National University of Hanoi

Ma Petite ville. Souvenirs de Peronne

Dr Philippe Martin-Lau

Young women and emerging post socialist sensibilities in contemporary Vietnam

Nguyen, Bich Thuan

Abstract:

This paper deals with the counterpolitics and interventions taking place around women's bodies, their relationships and their everyday lives. It is these interventions which form the basis around which the modernising tendencies in contemporary Vietnam are framed. We focus on the meanings of women's bodies from the sexual to the reproductive, from the instrument of labour and discipline to the focus on pleasure and from the fully lived to the dispersed and disarticulated. The new configurations of family, friendship and romance in Vietnam are being driven by young single women. The paper argues that young women's bodies and relationships are the most significant site of social change and fragmentation.

The paper explores the different forms of negotiation being undertaken by young women: negotiation between memory and forgetting, between public space and private space, between tradition and revolution, reproduction and sex, love and romance, and the associations and intermeshings of family, community and the collective with the individual. In spite of consistent images of feminine sacrifice in film, magazines and fiction, the forms of gendered nostalgia for family and contiguou s s ocial relations produce an idealised image of womanhood from which young Vietnamese women are increasingly withdrawing. We argue that these young women are no longer wanting to construct themselves in these either/or categories, either in relation to a nativist longing for a nationalist past represented by images of ideal rural femininity, or in a global capitalist culture of modernity as embodied in the urban cosmopolitan woman. Rather than being s queezed uncomfortably between these two poles, young women are experimenting with forms of friendship and expressive embodied display creating a new space for speaking the unapproved, the disallowed and the excluded.

Khian Thai

Assoc Prof Suthiwan, Titima

Abstract:
Thai Writing Workbook is specially prepared for elementary Thai language classes where the language is initially taught with the use of phonetic symbols. A step-by-step guide to writing Thai, it is based on a thorough linguistic analysis and on tested methodological principles. After completing the book, students should have a firm foundation of the Thai writing system.

Basic Japanese Vocabulary

Dr Toshiko Yamaguchi

Abstract:
This book is written as a supplementary guide for students who are at the initial stage of learning Japanese and wish to reinforce their learning by an effective mastery of basic words. While learning, students encounter similar words which they use interchangeably without realizing the subtle differences in meaning encoded in them.

This problem is not solved easily by looking in dictionaries or reading grammar books, or even by reviewing a vocabulary list supplemented by textbooks. This guide divides similar words into seven linguistically distinct, yet interrelated, areas which give rise to the similarity. In each chapter, a pair of words is presented under a single entry followed by concise explanations and clear examples. The book highlights what is most important for essential vocabulary learning.

Reading the book will help students grasp the overall structure of Japanese vocabulary. There are 135 entries covering more than 300 words in the main text. The book can be used by intermediate students who wish to refresh their knowledge of Japanese as well as by teachers of Japanese, particularly those whose mother tongue is not Japanese.

TOSHIKO YAMAGUCHI is a Japanese-language lecturer. This book grew out of the author's experience teaching Japanese language and linguistics in Malaysia and Singapore and from her recent research in Japanese linguistics and pedagogy. The author has a PhD in linguistics.

Foreign Language Teaching in Asia and Beyond - Current Perspectives and Future Directions

Assoc Prof Chan, Wai Meng, Assoc Prof Chin, Kwee Nyet and Assoc Prof Suthiwan, Titima

Abstract:
This book, comprising two parts, is concerned with both the science and the art of foreign language teaching, with a particular, but not exclusive, focus on Asia.

Under the theme of “Theoretical foundation and research”, Part 1 of this book informs the readers about recent efforts in theoretical and empirical research which have had a telling impact on foreign language teaching or promise to yield results that will potentially shape its future. These studies, not just from the domain of foreign language teaching but also its primary feeder disciplines of linguistics and second language acquisition, thus deliver the necessary theoretical and conceptual foundation for both current and future research and practice.

As its theme “Classroom practice and evaluation studies” suggests, Part 2 focuses on new and innovative developments in curricular and classroom practice, all built upon insights from research in the above-mentioned disciplines and possibly poised to become standard practices in the not too distant future. A good number of these projects included qualitative and quantitative evaluation studies which have yielded insightful data for the refinement and continued development of the projects and their underlying theoretical concepts.

Reduplicating Nouns and Verbs in Malay: A Conceptual Analysis

Mr Sew, Jyh Wee

Abstract:
This study focuses on nouns and verbs in Malay reduplication. Conceptual boundary is used as the necessary condition for reduplication to operate on the grammatical categories of noun and verb. Syntactic and semantic tests on the data derived from Malay newspapers, radio programme and popular magazine show that noun reduplication is more common than verb reduplication in Malay discourse. In the analysis of noun reduplication, the study differentiates the plural reference of Malay noun reduplication from that of bare noun.

This book provides an answer to what is the difference between orang (man) and orang-orang (men) in Malay. The pragmatics of noun reduplication is further identified with the concepts of definiteness and specificity in reference. The analyses show that definiteness of a noun reference varies across expression types. Answers to why reduplicated nouns cannot appear in some expressions are also provided. Malay verb reduplication, on the other hand, is examined in terms of aspect. This is the first analysis of Malay verb reduplication within internal temporal framework that projects a hypothesis on aspectuality. Perfective aspect in bounded verbs becomes the operating factor in verb reduplication. By invoking profile determinant in Cognitive Grammar, affixes are recognised as devices underpinning the reduplication of imperfective Malay verbs.

This book offer insights on the interplay of cognitive boundary as the underlying operator in Malay reduplication. The findings further the existing understanding on the syntax and semantics of reduplicated nouns and verbs in Malay discourse

Processes and Process- Orientation in Foreign Language Teaching and Learning

Assoc Prof Chan, Wai Meng, Assoc Prof Chin, Kwee Nyet, Mr Nagami Masanori and Assoc Prof Suthiwan, Titima

Abstract:
There can be no products without processes. This statement may seem to be no more than an overused generalisation but it does encapsulate the undoubted importance of processes and process-oriented approaches in language teaching and learning. In foreign language education, there has been much evidence in recent decades that researchers and practitioners alike are increasingly focusing their attention on:
  • the learner as the active subject of learning as well as the internal processes that constitute his/her learning and lead to the development of communicative competence;
  • teaching approaches, curricula and materials that reflect this view of language learning; and
  • other factors that may influence these internal processes, such as the sociocultural context, social interactions and discourse, and individual learner characteristics and differences. The theme of this book reflects this paradigm shift, and the papers included here from the disciplines of foreign language education and second language acquisition provide vital insights into processes in curriculum planning, instructional design, teaching methodology, teacher education and professional development, language acquisition, language discourse, classroom instruction and interactions, the development of language skills and learning strategies, and language learning motivation.

Semiotik Persembahan Wacana [Semiotics of Discourse Performing

Mr Sew, Jyh Wee

Abstract:
This study examines the semiotics of interactivity in various language settings. Learning discourse, Malay dramatic-theatrical expression, Malay romantic exchange, and Malay proverbs are scrutinized beyond grammar in verbal communication. While language is in use each time one strikes a conversation, the indices behind speaker-listener-audience dynamics are influenced by the motion, verbal styling and speaker-hearer-audiences' (non) participative responses. Social identity emerges from varying communicative indices of discourse performing.

Performing verbal interaction in a particular style generates a reading reflexive of gender/identity/social group. By manipulating discourse performing speakers, listeners and by-gazers are able to switch social identities on the fly. Each time a semiotic index is altered the course of interaction changes. And the significance of socio-semiotics in interactivity hence becomes pressing when communication sours into conflict. The exploration of social grammar in a nexus of human-language-topic-audience opens a wider window of human interaction.

Malay Interactivity, Malay Pedagogy, Malay Social Grammar, Performing Identities in Malay, Pantun and Proverbs, Interactive Semiotics

Persembahan@Media.com

Mr Sew, Jyh Wee

Abstract:
This book contains reflections on learning and socializing with digital media. Performing asynchronous communication and verbal interaction by combining new and old media is fast becoming the norms of everyday practice. This is especially true for those who enjoy interacting on the fly in more than one directed attention, for mobile, digital notebook and handset games may be used interchangeably to this end. In alignment with the knowledge economy, managing digital resource as a skill is profiled as a prerequisite for certain jobs. Views derived from Dow Jones Factiva, for example, may be part of rounded consideration hence becoming a relevant digital tool in decision making. A non-exhaustive list of experts on digital media and education from the Malay world of Southeast Asia is identified. Interestingly, the stable gender relations assumed by many unawares have become glaringly problematic in the virtual world. The narrative acknowledges that online participants may be at risk of cyber bullying. Cases leading to the victimization of digital media users are highlighted as precaution. SPAM is definitely an unwelcomed experience and managing SPAM is found to be a common digital irritation, either dismissive or costly. Digital media will continue to have an impact on daily interactivity.

Media in Foreign Language Teaching and Learning

Assoc Prof Chan, Wai Meng, Assoc Prof Chin, Kwee Nyet, Mr Nagami Masanori and Assoc Prof Suthiwan, Titima

Abstract:
While educationists and educational psychologists had in the 1990s intensely debated the direct influence of media on learning, there can really be little doubt that media have always been and will remain an integral constituent of any educational context. In particular, computer based and Internet media, with their immense processing power and multimedia capabilities, can have significant bearing on learning processes and outcomes in today’s learning environment. Such media, which are increasingly designed to allow for a high level of interactivity and adaptivity, can enable reflective, productive and communicative activities, and thus possess much potential for the promotion of foreign language learning.

This book contains 16 papers which look at a host of different media and different forms of media, and explore how these affect or can be applied to good effect in foreign language education. There are three parts to this book, with the first focusing on important theoretical and pedagogical issues to be considered when selecting and using media. In the second part, insightful findings from empirical research are presented on the role and contributions of different forms of media in language teaching and learning, including their effect on learners’ learning motivation. Then, the third and concluding part of the book provides in-depth accounts of how media can be harnessed to drive innovative curricular practice as well as students’ evaluations of these curricular projects

Communicative Practical Grammar of Indonesian Language for Beginners

Ms Johanna W. Istanto, Ms Jeniati S. Prasetio and Indrianti

Abstract:
To master a foreign language means to be able to use the target language as a means of communication in a real-life context. Thus, communicative competence is one of the significant goals in the teaching and learning process. One of the competences is grammatical competence. It portrays the learners’ knowledge of lexical items and of rules of morphology, syntax, sentence-grammar semantics, and phonology (Canale & Swain, 1980).Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) approach suggested a student centered class whereby grammar should be taught inductively by giving students the opportunity to generate grammar rules from the experience of using the target language (Brumfit, 1979; Richards et el, 1985; Long, 2000; Long & Robinson, 1998; Ellis, 2001).

Comprehensive examples in context in the form of dialogue or narration are included at the beginning of every chapter. The purpose of using this strategy is to encourage students to use their critical thinking and analyze the grammar rules found in the examples. The students are expected to formulate the grammar rules from the examples given. Different varieties of exercises are also given for students to practice the grammar rules. At the end of every lesson, there is a note to explain the usage of the grammar point related to that particular unit.

This textbook is designed to present a simple and practical manner of Indonesian grammar for students and teachers. It is intended to be used in the introductory level of learning Indonesian as a foreign language. This provides a compact, concise and practical learning material and offers variety of practices which is in accordance with the current pedagogical approach for foreign language teaching and learning.

Books by CLS


Foreign Language Teaching in Asia and Beyond - Current Perspectives and Future Directions

Chan, Wai Meng, Chin, Kwee Nyet and Suthiwan, Titima

Abstract:
This book, comprising two parts, is concerned with both the science and the art of foreign language teaching, with a particular, but not exclusive, focus on Asia.

Under the theme of “Theoretical foundation and research”, Part 1 of this book informs the readers about recent efforts in theoretical and empirical research which have had a telling impact on foreign language teaching or promise to yield results that will potentially shape its future. These studies, not just from the domain of foreign language teaching but also its primary feeder disciplines of linguistics and second language acquisition, thus deliver the necessary theoretical and conceptual foundation for both current and future research and practice.

As its theme “Classroom practice and evaluation studies” suggests, Part 2 focuses on new and innovative developments in curricular and classroom practice, all built upon insights from research in the above-mentioned disciplines and possibly poised to become standard practices in the not too distant future. A good number of these projects included qualitative and quantitative evaluation studies which have yielded insightful data for the refinement and continued development of the projects and their underlying theoretical concepts.

Processes and Process- Orientation in Foreign Language Teaching and Learning

Chan, Wai Meng, Chin, Kwee Nyet, Nagami Masanori and Suthiwan, Titima

Abstract:
There can be no products without processes. This statement may seem to be no more than an overused generalisation but it does encapsulate the undoubted importance of processes and process-oriented approaches in language teaching and learning. In foreign language education, there has been much evidence in recent decades that researchers and practitioners alike are increasingly focusing their attention on:
  • the learner as the active subject of learning as well as the internal processes that constitute his/her learning and lead to the development of communicative competence;
  • teaching approaches, curricula and materials that reflect this view of language learning; and
  • other factors that may influence these internal processes, such as the sociocultural context, social interactions and discourse, and individual learner characteristics and differences. The theme of this book reflects this paradigm shift, and the papers included here from the disciplines of foreign language education and second language acquisition provide vital insights into processes in curriculum planning, instructional design, teaching methodology, teacher education and professional development, language acquisition, language discourse, classroom instruction and interactions, the development of language skills and learning strategies, and language learning motivation.

Media in Foreign Language Teaching and Learning

Chan, Wai Meng, Chin, Kwee Nyet, Nagami Masanori and Suthiwan, Titima

Abstract:
While educationists and educational psychologists had in the 1990s intensely debated the direct influence of media on learning, there can really be little doubt that media have always been and will remain an integral constituent of any educational context. In particular, computer based and Internet media, with their immense processing power and multimedia capabilities, can have significant bearing on learning processes and outcomes in today’s learning environment. Such media, which are increasingly designed to allow for a high level of interactivity and adaptivity, can enable reflective, productive and communicative activities, and thus possess much potential for the promotion of foreign language learning.

This book contains 16 papers which look at a host of different media and different forms of media, and explore how these affect or can be applied to good effect in foreign language education. There are three parts to this book, with the first focusing on important theoretical and pedagogical issues to be considered when selecting and using media. In the second part, insightful findings from empirical research are presented on the role and contributions of different forms of media in language teaching and learning, including their effect on learners’ learning motivation. Then, the third and concluding part of the book provides in-depth accounts of how media can be harnessed to drive innovative curricular practice as well as students’ evaluations of these curricular projects

Perspectives on Individual Characteristics and Foreign Language Education

Chan, Wai Meng, Chin, Kwee Nyet, Sunil Kumar Bhatt and Izumi Walker

Abstract:
Learner characteristics have been at the center of second language acquisition and foreign language education research in response to the puzzling questions: Why are there often large differences in second language (L2) learning achievement and why do many learners, though proficient first language speakers, not succeed in learning a L2? The papers in this book explore and challenge the three key factors in individual difference research: language aptitude, language learning strategies and motivation.


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