banner-research

Research Talks

2014

August

Date

Time

Venue

Talk Title

Speaker

27 Aug 14

3.00pm

CNM Meeting Room

 Digital Analytics in Journalism Sharon Ng

20 Aug 14

3.00pm

CNM Meeting Room

 User commentary on online news: User Motivations and Outcome Nina Springer

13 Aug 14

3.00pm

CNM Meeting Room

 Startup ecosystems in the emerging markets - A research project on alternate Silicon Valleys  Martin Pasquier

4 Aug 14

11.00am

AS4 #04-05

 'Religious Conflict Sensitivity’, Social Movement and New Media: A Critical Analysis of Gonojagoron Moncho Movement in Bangladesh  Sameeo Sheesh

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July

Date

Time

Venue

Talk Title

Speaker

25 July 14

7.00pm

Kent Ridge Guild House

 Does the News make the Science? A new perspective on Media-Medical Linkages  Charles Leslie Briggs

23 July 14

11.00am

Shaw Foundation Building. AS7 6th Floor

 Challenging Communicate and Health Inequities: New Perspectives Forged in Rabies Epidemic  Charles Leslie Briggs

18 July 14

11.00am

CNM Meeting Room

 Neuromarketing and Cognitive Processing of Advertising Messages: Applying Information Introduced(ii) to Advertising Research  Byungho PARK

9 July 14

12.00pm

CNM Meeting Room

 Thinking Design, tinkering.net  Jean-Marc Gauthier

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June

Date

Time

Venue

Talk Title

Speaker

11 Jun 14

12.00pm

CNM Meeting Room

 The Effects of Multiple Opinion Climates on Minority Opinion Expression in Online Discusiions  Dr. Elmie Nekmat

 

 

 

 

April

Date

Time

Venue

Talk Title

Speaker

30 Apr 14

1.00pm

CNM Meeting Room

 The Spurious Kang: An Ethnographic Account of Culture's Place in a Chinese Village  Dr. Kang Sun

16 Apr 14

3.00pm

CNM Meeting Room

 Understanding Engagement and Experience  Mr. David Ayman Shamma

9 Apr 14

3.30pm

CNM Meeting Room

Canvassing the City: Street Art, Protest, and Counter-Politics in Kathmandu Ms Rachel Devi Amtzis

2 Apr 14

 3.30pm

CNM Meeting Room

How do audiences react to interacting with an audiovisual narrative? Notes about some psychological responses when deciding the plot

Prof. Maria T. Soto-Sanfiel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March

February

Date

Time

Venue

Talk Title

Speaker

19 Feb 14

3.30pm

CNM Meeting Room

Women Farmer's Voices on Climate Change: A Culture-Centered Approach to Climate Change Adaptation

Dr. Jagadish Thaker

11 Feb 14

3.30pm

CNM Meeting Room

 The Fandom Publics: China’s Netizen-in-Making

Dr. Weiyu Zhang

5 Feb 14

3.30pm

CNM Meeting Room

Media Literacy, Ethnic Performance, and Stereotyping Processes

Dr. Srivi Ramasubramanian

 

 

 

 

 

 

January

Date

Time

Venue

Talk Title

Speaker

22 Jan 14

3.30pm

CNM Meeting Room

Evolution and Advancement of Health Communication Inquiry: Scholarship that can Make a Difference 

Dr. Gary L. Kreps

15 Jan 14

3.30pm

CNM Meeting Room

Intimate Spaces for Health Communication:  Sex Workers’ Narratives and Strategies with Clients

Dr. Yasmin Lalani

 

 

 

 

 

2013

November

NovTalk

Title:

Visually communicating lived experience: the utility of photovoice as community-based participatory research

Date:

1st November 2013

Venue:

CNM Meeting Room

Content:

In this presentation, we will explore the usefulness of conducting a community-based participatory research method called “photovoice.” In photovoice, participants are asked to represent their community point of view by taking photos, discussing them together, developing narratives to go with their photos, and conducting action to address issues of community concern. In this presentation, I will present parts of several photo voice projects I have conducted for discussion though we will focus mainly on the “SNAP photovoice project.” In this project, formerly homeless individuals were approached and asked to document both the aspects of their lives that threaten to send them “back to the streets” as well as the resources that they draw upon to help them navigate the process of “home stability.”

Bio:

Jeff Peterson received his Ph.D. in Intercultural Communication from the University of New Mexico in 2006. While at UNM, he received a Post-Doctoral Minority Research Fellowship jointly administered by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, The Associated Schools of Public Health, and the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) Prevention Research Centers. He is currently an Associate Professor in the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University where he teaches classes in Intercultural Communication, Global Processes in Intercultural Contexts, and Qualitative Research Methods. Dr. Peterson’s work falls within the intersection of Intercultural Communication and Health Communication. His research interests focus on understanding the processes by which knowledge is created and used for the benefit of vulnerable and underserved populations. He has investigated the creation, utilization, and dissemination of both science-based research and “habit-based” public health practice while distinguishing between research created for vulnerable communities, with, and by these communities. He has worked with racial and ethnic minorities (e.g. Hispanic farm workers, American Indian populations) and other groups (such as the formerly homeless) whose needs are not met by traditional social service programs or who feel they cannot comfortably or safely access and use these standard resources. Peterson’s most recent work will appear in a forthcoming chapter on Enhancing Research Utilization in Public Health Research Methods published by Sage.

October

Alex Mitchell sm

Title:

Telling Stories on the Go: Lessons From the Travel Teller Mobile Thematic Storytelling System

Date:

16th October 2013

Venue:

CNM Meeting Room

Content:

Although mobile devices make it easier for travellers to share stories both during and after their travels, these postings are often time-based, with minimal narrative structure. This paper describes an observational study of Travel Teller, a storytelling system designed to help tourists share their experiences as stories by providing thematic recommendations for mobile postings. Interestingly, although our design assumed people want to tell stories while travelling, our observations suggest otherwise. Rather than actively telling a story as they travel, participants stated a preference for remaining in the moment, and only later reflecting on and structuring their experience as a story. They viewed recommendations as approximate destinations, taking photos of things they stumbled upon rather than of the recommendation itself, and often put recommendations "on hold" to be resumed later. This suggests tools should support distinct story-gathering and story-telling activities, aim to inspire not prescribe, and flexibly track "pending" recommendations.

Bio:

Alex Mitchell teaches interactive media design in the Department of Communications and New Media at the National University of Singapore. He has a B.Sc. and an M.Sc. in Computer Science from the University of Toronto, and a PhD at the NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, where he was attached to the Partner Technologies Research Group. Alex's current research investigates various aspects of computer-based art and entertainment, focusing in particular on interactive stories. This work involves creating digital and non-digital interactive storytelling systems, using these systems to develop creative works, and observing how people respond to the resulting pieces. It also involves theoretical work to understand what is happening in and around this process.

August

terenceheng

Title:

HUNGRY GHOSTS IN SUBURBAN SPACES: VISUAL SOCIOLOGIES OF TAOIST RITES IN SINGAPORE

Date:

18th September 2013

Venue:

CNM Meeting Room

Content:

The Hungry Ghost Festival is celebrated during the 7th Month of the Chinese Lunar calendar, during which it is believed that spirits of the dead are released from the netherworld to roam the earth. Using visual case studies from Bukit Brown Cemetery, Teck Ghee Court in Ang Mo Kio and a suburban Sin Tua in Bukit Batok, this seminar will consider the material, social and cultural implications of everyday religious rites that communicate not only diasporic memories and ethnicities, but also form layers of racial and spiritual spatialities over sometimes forgotten and forsaken spaces in Singapore.

Bio:

Dr Terence Heng is a photographer and visual sociologist. He graduated from Goldsmiths, University of London with a PhD in Visual Sociology, and is currently teaching at various institutions around Singapore, including UniSIM, the National University of Singapore and the Glasgow School of Art Singapore. He has published his work in journals such as Cultural Geographies and Sociological Research Online. His visual essay on Teck Ghee Court is forthcoming in the journal Visual Communication.

July

lindtner

Title:

Making Subjectivities: How China's DIY makers remake Industrial Production, Innovation & the self

Date:

29th July 11.30am

Venue:

CNM Meeting Room

Content:

In this talk, Lindtner shows how the visions and practices of DIY (do it yourself) making are taken up in China. She analyzes, in particular, how DIY maker ideals of open-ness, resourcefulness and individual empowerment are formulated in relation to China's political discourse of building a creative society. To demostrate, she draws from mu ethnographic research that traces the set-up of China's first hackerspace to the proliferation of making through a growing number of hackerspaces, events, and partnerships between makers and manufacturers. China's makers are driven to remake what creativity and industrial production mean today, both exploiting and challenging political rhetoric. By setting up hackerspaces, designing open technologies and starting up businesses, they enable alternative subject positions, for themselves and others. The contribution of this work is three-fold. First, it fills a gap in prior research by providing an account of a culture of technology production. Second, it proposes the alaytical lens of "making subjectivites" to open up the concept of the online identity or netizen to include the use and design of technologies as central to crafting heterogeneous positions in society. Third, it demonstrates that makers alter the system from within, contributing to our understanding of the relationship between technology use, production, society, and the state.

Bio:

Silvia Lindtner is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Irvine and at Fudan University. She studies DIY maker culture, with a focus on its intersections with manufacturing and enterpreneurialism in China, expressions of selfhood and collectivity, and globalized processes of labor. She brings together ethnographic methods with design methods, actively participating the technology production she studies. Her interdisciplinary methods with design methods, actively participating in the technology production she studies. Her interdiciplinary work contributes to and draws from STS, information and communication stdies, digital media studies, design, and cultural anthropology.

HOME   |  ABOUT CNM   |   PEOPLE  |  UNDERGRADUATES   |  GRADUATES  |   RESEARCH   |   MEDIA   |   ALUMNI   |  CONTACT