Theatre Studies Modules

Theatre Studies offers a wide range of modules in contemporary approaches to thinking about performance, as well as thinking through practice. They are grouped in three strands: Timeframes, Cultural Practices and Perspective on Performance. Modules focus on specific theatre and performance cultures, histories, movements, practices and ideas, such as pre-modern Asian theatres, cinematic and digital practices, popular culture, cultural performance in Asia and applied theatre. Across the range from introductory modules (including GE and SS modules) to more specialised topics, the modules share a common commitment to understanding how theatre is made and the contexts in which it has significance for its communities.

One of the most distinctive things about Theatre Studies is the range of activities it entails. At NUS, these diverse kinds of learning include:
• Lectures and seminars
• Workshops, practical sessions and group projects
• Working on productions and creating performances
• Field trips to the theatre and other events
• Independent study and thesis writing
• Practice research with staff members
• Internships with professional companies and arts institutions

Unless otherwise stated, all level 1000–3000 modules carry 4 modular credits (MCs), while all level 4000 modules carry 5 MCs (except EN4401 which carries 15 MCs). For more details on the modules below, consult IVLE or contact the course lecturer.

Modules offered in AY2016/2017 Semester 1

Robin LOON

This module will provide students with foundational knowledge of the different aspects of, approaches and discursive contexts relating to the study and praxis of theatre and performance. The module will also introduce students to the various forms of classical and contemporary performance practices and their attendant modes of analyses: combining play analysis, theatre history & theory. Using complementary content-centred lectures and practice laboratory, the module creates an environment where students simultaneously engage with module content while investigating its relations to the creation of theatre and performance.

Strand: Survey (Cohort 2013 and before) / Non-stranded (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: Exempted from NUS Qualifying English Test, or passed NUS Qualifying English Test, or exempted from further CELC Remedial English modules.
Preclusion: GEM1003
Cross-listing: GEM1003
Maiya MURPHY

From religious rituals to personal identity, propaganda to public protests, media spectacles to interactive artworks, performance is a prevalent feature of contemporary societies. Performance Studies draws on anthropology, cultural studies and art theory to explore how these and related phenomena work, what effects they have, and how they relate to each other. This introductory module provides an overview of the key concepts behind a fast-developing discipline, and uses them to interpret a range of social practices and performance events that can be found in Singapore and other highly globalised societies. The module combines fieldwork, critical thinking, and performance analysis.

Strand: Performance and Cultural Studies (Cohort 2013 and before) / Perspectives on Performance (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: TS1101E or GEM1003
Grant SHEN

This module focuses on the classical theatre forms of India, China, and Japan. Each tradition is examined within its socio-cultural context. Textual analysis of classical scripts from Sanskrit drama, Chinese opera, and Japanese theatre will also be conducted. Students’ learning experience is often constructed in stimulated theatre settings to promote their creativity and to provide them with a working knowledge of performing arts. Students interested in theatre studies, South Asian studies, Chinese studies, and Japanese studies may particularly benefit from this module.

Strand: Survey (Cohort 2013 and before) / Timeframes (from Cohort 2014)
Preclusion: GEM2001
Cross-listing: GEM2001
Natalie HENNEDIGE, LEE Xin

This module focuses on key figures and aspects of contemporary performance as a means of learning about innovative approaches to theatre practice. Taking the works of a significant dramatist, director, theorist or theatre/performance genre as their starting point, students will investigate the resulting aesthetic and conceptual innovations, and explore their implications for current approaches to performance making more generally. As such, the module combines creative and critical practice, and features a variety of reflective, analytical and practical assessment tasks, including a group performance project.

Strand: Theory and Practice (Cohort 2013 and before) / Timeframes (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: TS1101E or GEM1003
Nora SAMOSIR, Maiya MURPHY

Actors and their craft stand at the centre of many theatrical traditions. Yet what acting is, and who actors are, remain subjects of intense fascination, which continue to be explored in live performance, as well as through writings by practitioners, scholars and critics. This module combines practical workshops and critical reading to explore diverse approaches to acting and to investigate the role and status of the actor within the art form of theatre, and in society at large. Focusing on actor development and the process of acting, assessment tasks highlight the importance of participation, reflection and presentation.

Strand: Theory and Practice (Cohort 2013 and before) / Perspectives on Performance (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: TS1101E or GEM1003
Graham WOLFE

This module focuses on the close reading of dramatic texts in order to study the dynamic relationship between text & performance. Through the examination of 4 major modern playwrights working in different historical, geographical and cultural contexts, this course will explore the development of modern drama in the twentieth-century, the significance of text as the basis of theatrical realisation, the variety of staging possibilities engendered by the dramaturgy of the play-text, and the synergistic partnership of word and action in creating the huge variety of text-based theatre in the twentieth-century. Can be read by EN students in fulfilment of EN major requirements at Level-2000, as a recognised module

Strand: Area Studies/Topics in Theatre (Cohort 2013 and before) / Timeframes (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: TS1101E or EN1101E or GEM1003
LIANG Peilin

Asian theatre practitioners of the twentieth century have greatly contributed to the conception and formation of modernity in Asia. This module highlights three key historical moments in Asia’s modernising process: Asia’s initial contacts with Europe and America at the turn of the century; the postwar era between the 1960s and the 1980s when political activism was at its height; and the more recent global and local theatre collaborations in the region. This module combines the study of theatre history, play texts, and digital recordings of performances to trace the development and evolution of modern Asia from a theatre’s perspective.

Strand: Area Studies/Topics in Theatre (Cohort 2013 and before) / Timeframes (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: TS1101E or GEM1003
LIANG Peilin

This module develops students' theoretical and practical perspectives of Applied Theatre, a term that embraces different strands of socially engaged theatre, and focuses on the 'usefulness' of theatre in various educational and community contexts. Through exploring a range of practical approaches deployed by some key practitioners in the field, students are guided to think critically about how the social efficacy of theatre can be promoted and debated. Leading approaches are re-examined in light of context‐ and culture‐specific situations, and students' practical experience form a basis to engage with theoretical questions and issues of creating participatory theatre in non‐conventional settings.

Strand: Theory and Practice (Cohort 2013 and before) / Perspectives on Performance (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: TS1101E or GEM1003
Preclusion: TS4880B
Jasmine NG

This module focuses on performance as a major component in the fabric of our everyday lives, especially in the ways we observe and absorb the myriad performances that surround us, both `mediated’ and `live’. Through initial discussions, presentations and workshops we will explore notions of authenticity and transformation in performance, with particular focus on cinema, television, advertising and other popular media. Various theoretical models will be considered, including those that relate to avant-garde and experimental performance. A final project will be developed over several weeks, in which the students work in groups to create a short video that integrates these approaches with their own ideas about performance.

Strand: Theory and Practice (Cohort 2013 and before) / Cultural Practices (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: TS1101E or GEM1003
Grant SHEN

Asian performance has had a huge impact on the twentieth-century world theatre. Prominent figures, such as Stanislavski, Artaud, Brecht, Brook, Grotowski, Suzuki and Schechner, were influenced by Asian acting. This module teaches the Asian performance traditions of the golden age: the Sanskrit theatre of India, zaju opera of China, and kabuki of Japan. The principles and philosophies of these traditions are compared as an organic whole that differs significantly from Western traditions. Students are guided to explore masterpieces in a Renaissance manner, imitating and reviving both their style and spirit. The module also serves as a reference for intercultural performances.

Strand: Theory and Practice (Cohort 2013 and before) / Cultural Practices (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: TS1101E or GEM1003
Workload: Total of 150-200 hrs

This module provides Arts 3 students majoring in Theatre Studies with the opportunity of an internship project in theatre organisations. It matches individual students’ interests and skills with internship roles in stagecraft, stage production, event planning, theatre in education, research and administration offered by theatre companies. Through research papers, regular reports, and a final presentation, students are trained to integrate theoretical knowledge with practical application, develop skills in teamwork and problem-solving, and form research parameters and gather data to address issues in theatre practice from a critical perspective. Students are selected competitively on the basis of interviews and portfolios.

Strand: Theory and Practice (Cohort 2013 and before) / Perspectives on Performance (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: TS1101E. Only for TS Major students who are in or going into their third year.
YONG Li Lan

Shakespeare’s plays have been known in many parts of Asia for about 100 years, and contemporary Asian theatre practice shows at once a great diversity of approaches to them, and patterns of common interest in production and reception. This module takes recent productions from different theatre cultures to compare how Shakespeare’s texts are engaged through non-realist aesthetic principles, and how self-reflexive treatments of naturalism, as well as new scripts based on his plays, interact with the cultural values represented by Shakespeare in the East and Southeast Asian region. Assessment includes the option of a creative project.

Strand: Area Studies/Topics in Theatre (Cohort 2013 and before) / Cultural Practices (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: TS1101E or GEM1003 or EN1101E or GEK1000
Note: Can be read by EN students in fulfilment of EN major requirements at level 3000, as a recognised module.
Miguel ESCOBAR

What is the form and function of theatricality in contemporary Asian society? This module seeks to answer this question by investigating a range of collective practices of symbolic action and meaning‐making that have become known as "cultural performance". The methodological perspectives of Performance Studies will be deployed to contextualise cultural performances that contribute so arrestingly to social reality in East and Southeast Asia. Students will participate in a field trip and learn a variety of research techniques such as practice‐based inquiry, interviews, performance analysis, historical analysis and visual ethnography to develop individual research projects throughout the semester.

Strand: Performance and Cultural Studies (Cohort 2013 and before) / Cultural Practices (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in TS with a minimum CAP of 3.50 or be on the Honours track.
Cohort 2012 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in TS or 28 MCs in GL/GL recognised non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.
Robin LOON

This module examines popular media-mediated events “as” performance. The module will investigate the way in which ‘mediatised’ (i.e., media-mediated) and popular events “perform” and shape the audience’s perception of reality. Conversely, the module will also examine how media-mediated performance is influenced by audience interests and perceptions. The focus will be on popular media-mediated events like sports, reality TV, the internet to illustrate how they constitute different modes of performances while sharing similar performativities. The module will also focus on cross-genre, inter-disciplinary performances while also examining notions of the spectacular and spectacle in contemporary visual culture.

Strand: Performance and Cultural Studies (Cohort 2013 and before) / Cultural Practices (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in TS with a minimum CAP of 3.50 or be on the Honours track.
Cohort 2012 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in TS or 28 MCs in GL/GL recognised non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.
YONG Li Lan

This module provides a study of how the literary and performance traditions associated with Shakespeare’s work are mobilised and transformed by the visual cultures of contemporary cinema. Through the intersections between the mediums of the dramatic text, theatre and film, the course examines central issues that shape Shakespeare’s currency and circulation in the cinema: the values attached to authenticity and performance traditions, the Shakespearean actor, the appropriation and parody of the “universality” of Shakespeare, and the transformation of the meaningfulness of his plays through visuality and spectacle.

Strand: Performance and Cultural Studies (Cohort 2013 and before) / Perspectives on Performance (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in TS or 28 MCs in EN, with a minimum CAP of 3.50 or be on the Honours track.
Cohort 2012 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in TS or 28 MCs in EN or 28 MCs in GL/GL recognised non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.
Note: Can be read by EN students in fulfilment of EN major requirements at level 4000, as a recognised module.
Felipe CERVERA

Doing performance can teach us things that watching it cannot. This module uses performance practice as a research methodology to investigate otherwise inaccessible questions of creativity, embodiment, and performance processes. The three main components of the module include: defining a research question, designing and conducting experiments/observations, presenting the outcomes. Students will conceptualise and execute their own research project, in a relationship of collaborative research with artists. The nature of the project determines the resulting presentation: multi-media talk, lecture-demonstration, or short performance or workshop. The module will also focus on case studies from a range of cultural and stylistic sources.

Strand: Theory and Practice (Cohort 2013 and before) / Perspectives on Performance (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in TS, with a minimum CAP of 3.50 or be on the Honours track.
Cohort 2012 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in TS, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.
LIANG Peilin

The module trains students to become independent performance-based researchers in applied theatre. Students further develop their critical and creative skills through exposure to key practical approaches and critical theories in the field. To consolidate skills in integrating practice with theory, students will undertake Performance as Research projects of considerable scope with attention given to the social and cultural complexity of specific communities and contexts. Applied theatre as a form of social intervention, community engagement and knowledge production will be examined.

Strand: Theory and Practice (Cohort 2013 and before) / Perspectives on Performance (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in TS, with a minimum CAP of 3.50 or be on the Honours track.
Cohort 2012 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in TS, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.
Modular Credits: 15

The Honours Thesis is usually done in the second semester of a student’s registration in the Honours Degree Programme.

Strand: Area Studies/Topics in Theatre (Cohort 2013 and before) / Non-stranded (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite:
Cohort 2012 and before: Completed 110 MCs, including 60 MCs of TS major requirements with a minimum CAP of 3.50.
Cohort 2013-2015: Completed 110 MCs including 60 MCs of TS major requirements with a minimum SJAP of 4.00 and CAP of 3.50, or with recommendation by the programme committee. Students may seek a waiver of the SJAP pre-requisite from the department if they have a minimum CAP of 4.25 after completing 110 MCs.
Cohort 2016 onwards: Completed 110 MCs including 44 MCs of TS major requirements with a minimum SJAP of 4.00 and CAP of 3.50, or with recommendation by the programme committee. Students may seek a waiver of the SJAP pre-requisite from the department if they have a minimum CAP of 4.25 after completing 110 MCs.

Preclusion: TS4660

Note: Please register TS4401 manually with the Department.
Documents containing important information on TS4401 should be downloaded from “Documents and Forms.
The Independent Study Module is designed to enable the student to explore an approved topic within the discipline in depth. The student should approach a lecturer to work out an agreed topic, readings, and assignments for the module. A formal, written agreement is to be drawn up, giving a clear account of the topic, programme of study, assignments, evaluation, and other pertinent details. The Head’s and/or Honours Coordinator’s approval of the written agreement is required. Regular meetings and reports are expected. Evaluation is based on 100% Continuous Assessment and must be worked out between the student and the lecturer prior to seeking departmental approval.

Strand: Area Studies/Topics in Theatre (Cohort 2013 and before) / Non-stranded (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 100 MCs, including 60 MCs in TS, with a minimum CAP of 3.50.
Cohort 2012-2015: Completed 100 MCs, including 60 MCs in TS, with a minimum CAP of 3.20.
Cohort 2016 onwards: Completed 100 MCs, including 44 MCs in TS, with a minimum CAP of 3.20.

Preclusion: TS4401

Note: Please register TS4660 manually with the Department.
Documents containing important information on TS4660 should be downloaded from “Documents and Forms.”
Independent research plays an important role in graduate education. The Independent Study Module is designed to enable the student to explore an approved topic in Theatre Studies in depth. The student should approach a lecturer to work out an agreed topic, readings, and assignments for the module. A formal, written agreement is to be drawn up, giving a clear account of the topic, programme of study, assignments, evaluation, and other pertinent details. The Head's and/or Graduate Coordinator's approval of the written agreement is required. Regular meetings and reports are expected. Evaluation is based on 100% Continuous Assessment and the balance of written and other components must be worked out between the student and the lecturer prior to seeking departmental approval.

Note:
(1) Word limit: 4,000 – 6,000 words, the lower limit being permissible only where the project involves a substantial amount of practical work, and is agreed with the supervisor.
(2) Workload: Minimum 10 hours per week. The precise breakdown of contact hours, assignment and preparation is to be worked out between the lecturer and the student, subject to Departmental approval.
Independent research plays an important role in graduate education. The Independent Study Module is designed to enable the student to explore an approved topic in Theatre Studies in depth. The student should approach a lecturer to work out an agreed topic, readings, and assignments for the module. A formal, written agreement is to be drawn up, giving a clear account of the topic, programme of study, assignments, evaluation, and other pertinent details. The Head’s and/or Graduate Coordinator’s approval of the written agreement is required. Regular meetings and reports are expected. Evaluation is based on 100% Continuous Assessment and the balance of written and other components must be worked out between the student and the lecturer prior to seeking departmental approval.

Note:
(1) Word limit: 6,000 – 8,000 words, the lower limit being permissible only where the project involves a substantial amount of practical work, and is agreed with the supervisor.
(2) Workload: Minimum 10 hours per week. The precise breakdown of contact hours, assignment and preparation is to be worked out between the lecturer and the student, subject to Departmental approval.

Modules offered in AY2016/2017 Semester 2

Maiya MURPHY

This module will provide students with foundational knowledge of the different aspects of, approaches and discursive contexts relating to the study and praxis of theatre and performance. The module will also introduce students to the various forms of classical and contemporary performance practices and their attendant modes of analyses: combining play analysis, theatre history & theory. Using complementary content-centred lectures and practice laboratory, the module creates an environment where students simultaneously engage with module content while investigating its relations to the creation of theatre and performance.

Strand: Survey (Cohort 2013 and before) / Non-stranded (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: Exempted from NUS Qualifying English Test, or passed NUS Qualifying English Test, or exempted from further CELC Remedial English modules.
Preclusion: GEM1003
Cross-listing: GEM1003

Intended for students majoring in Theatre Studies, this module aims to explore how the boundaries of social and cultural identities are constructed and crossed in performance. By looking at various forms of performance texts, it will examine a) racial and gender identities represented in the body and language, b) patterns of image-making and c) the performative dynamics of the encounter between different identities. Throughout the course, students will be guided to address the questions of how the differences across the borderlines are represented and challenged and, also, whether these boundaries are ultimately directed towards specific cultural ends.

Strand: Area Studies/Topics in Theatre (Cohort 2013 and before) / Cultural Practices (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: TS1101E or GEM1003
Nora SAMOSIR

This module looks at how one’s voice is made and how one can modulate it. Students will get an understanding of the physiological processes that produce voice and the relationship between mind and body in vocal communication. Hence this is also a very practical workshop using techniques developed by actors and singers that will improve the resonance and musicality of the speaking voice and also vocal strength and endurance. Using verse, prose and dramatic text, students will work on vocal characteristics – pitch, intonation patterns, pace and pausing, placement – and so improve their oral delivery.

Strand: Theory and Practice (Cohort 2013 and before) / Perspectives on Performance (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: TS1101E or GEM1003
Modular credits: 8

As the graduation production of the Theatre Studies Programme, this module represents the culmination of a student’s training in theatre. The production project provides the graduating cohort with the collaborative experience of mounting a professional theatre production as a company. Working under the guidance of a different guest director each year, students are trained in the various aspects of the production process and performance as actors, stage designers, and production and marketing teams, to develop creative as well as practical skills. This is an essential module for Theatre Studies major students, read in Year 3 of a student’s enrolment.

Strand: Theory and Practice (Cohort 2013 and before) / Perspectives on Performance (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: TS major students who have completed a minimum of 80 MCs.
Note: Non-TS major students should not access this module.
Maiya MURPHY

This module interrelates Western history and theatre practice from approximately 1800 to the present, and constitutes a continuation of the theoretical, literary, technological, and historical roots of Western theatre begun in TS2231; it serves as an overview primarily for Theatre Studies majors but is accessible to others interested. The approach for the module draws from multiple disciplines and perspectives. It stresses the relationship of historical forces, ideological movements, and theatre practice in Europe and the Americas. Seminal play texts are discussed in detail, and, as appropriate, in a background of interdisciplinary material, including intercultural, filmic and cybernetic perspectives.

Strand: Survey (Cohort 2013 and before) / Timeframes (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: TS1101E or GEM1003
Grant SHEN

This module explores the rich sources of ritual theatre, dance drama, script plays, and puppetry of Southeast Asia. Some of them as living theatre are only available in the region. The performative heritage of shamanism and exorcism will be examined against the phenomena of trance and human sacrifice. The impact of the Southeast Asia performance on the Western avant-garde theatre will be studied. Key subsidiary issues such as authenticity, cultural appropriation will be considered as well. Independent study of primary material is required. Students of theatre studies, sociology, and history may find this module useful.

Strand: Survey (Cohort 2013 and before) / Cultural Practices (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: TS1101E or GEM1003

This module provides an introduction to the basic tenets of performance studies (i.e. performance and performativity) and applies them to a study of popular culture in a global arena. Through a variety of texts including plays, television programmes and films, the module teaches how the production and circulation of popular forms can be read as performance: how they are produced or packaged for consumption, how the consumer relates to them and how their success or failure is measured. It will show the pervasiveness and relevance of performativity in everyday societal interactions and the hybridisation of Asian and Euro-American cultures.

Strand: Performance and Cultural Studies (Cohort 2013 and before) / Cultural Practices (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: TS1101E or GEM1003
Robin LOON

This module provides a grand overview of Singapore English Language Theatre as well as an in-depth analysis of its canonical texts. It traces the development of Singapore’s cultural identity through her theatre’s shifting strategies of representation. Apart from contextualising the key texts within an awareness of Singapore cultural policy and social rubric, this module also focuses on an understanding of theoretical paradigms from postcolonialism, feminism, interculturalism and postmodernism.

Strand: Area Studies/Topics in Theatre (Cohort 2013 and before) / Cultural Practices (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: TS1101E or GEM1003
Preclusion: SSA3201
Cross-listing: SSA3201
Grant SHEN

This module investigates a wide range of classical Asian dramatic texts, including masterpieces from Indian Sanskrit theatre, Chinese opera, and Japanese Noh and Kabuki. The social milieus in which the drama evolved are examined, and the illusionary world which ancient theatergoers imagined is reconstructed. The module treats dramatic literature as a vital component of living theatre, not as reading material, and thus complements TS3237, which teaches the staging practices of Asian theatre. Towards the end of the semester, Western canonical dramaturgy serves as a comparative reference to Asian materials, which enhances intercultural study or practice in other modules.

Strand: Area Studies/Topics in Theatre (Cohort 2013 and before) / Timeframes (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: TS1101E or GEM1003
Robin LOON

This module will cover the writing and the critical aspect of theatre criticism – the art of writing theatre reviews. The role of the theatre critic will be examined in conjunction with the stylistic and formal contents of theatre criticism. The module will explore the uses and elements of theatre criticism with a heavy emphasis on the practical applications of the techniques and skills of writing play analysis in communicating the theatrical experience to the reader. This module will also explore the different modes of publishing in old and new media and examine how they affect reviewer-reader communication.

Strand: Theory and Practice (Cohort 2013 and before) / Perspectives on Performance (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: TS1101E or GEM1003
Edna LIM

This module explores the many ways in which theatre and film are distinct but closely inter-related mediums. The bulk of the module focuses on close analysis of texts that have been adapted from the stage to the screen, examining performativity within those texts and how the essential properties that define the stage and the screen contribute to and facilitate particular ways for performing such texts. Notions of theatricality and the cinema will be interrogated, especially in relation to how cinema can be ‘theatrical’ and the theatre ‘cinematic’. Teaching and assessment modes include lectures, seminars, workshops and guided practical coursework.

Strand: Performance and Cultural Studies (Cohort 2013 and before) / Perspectives on Performance (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: TS1101E or GEM1003
Workload: Total of 150-200 hrs

This module provides Arts 3 students majoring in Theatre Studies with the opportunity of an internship project in theatre organisations. It matches individual students’ interests and skills with internship roles in stagecraft, stage production, event planning, theatre in education, research and administration offered by theatre companies. Through research papers, regular reports, and a final presentation, students are trained to integrate theoretical knowledge with practical application, develop skills in teamwork and problem-solving, and form research parameters and gather data to address issues in theatre practice from a critical perspective. Students are selected competitively on the basis of interviews and portfolios.

Strand: Theory and Practice (Cohort 2013 and before) / Perspectives on Performance (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: TS1101E. Only for TS Major students who are in or going into their third year.
YONG Li Lan, Miguel ESCOBAR

The informal archiving of events through recording technology and social media is now an everyday activity, such that the event and its record are increasingly intertwined. This module provides a hands-on introduction to the considerations and processes in the digital archiving of theatre performances. Issues in the selection of materials, their ownership and presentation will be explored through the interests of different parties: the archivists, the institution housing the archive, the copyright holders and the archive’s users. Students will be guided in group projects to archive a set of performance materials for different kinds of archives in the digital humanities.

Strand: Theory and Practice (Cohort 2013 and before) / Perspectives on Performance (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite: TS1101E or GEM1003
Graham WOLFE

This is not a course about Postmodernism. This is a course examining the relationship between Postmodernism and Theatre, their tensions and complements. The course will examine notions of theatricality and performativity that have come to characterise Postmodernism. Related ideas of simulacra and rehearsal, occularism and spectatorship, self-consciousness and self-reflexivity will be debated and discussed. Postmodernism as style, attitude and as mode will be pitched against performance aesthetics and theatre techniques to further explore the relationship between the two. The course will also locate Singapore theatre practices in the context of a global postmodernity.

Strand: Area Studies/Topics in Theatre (Cohort 2013 and before) / Perspectives on Performance (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in TS, with a minimum CAP of 3.50 or be on the Honours track.
Cohort 2012 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in TS, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.
Miguel ESCOBAR

Live performance is a vibrant and dynamic art form, and innovations in aesthetics and technique mean that it is constantly changing. Over the course of this module, students will conduct a critical assessment of recent developments in performance practice, and of their implications for performance theory and analysis. Recent trends in performance and scholarship will be surveyed, informed by a combination of publications, electronic resources, and theatre-going. Students will be assessed on their capacity to develop informed responses to the work, to conduct and present independent research into current trends, and to reflect critically on the concept of the ‘contemporary’.

Strand: Area Studies/Topics in Theatre (Cohort 2013 and before) / Timeframes (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in TS, with a minimum CAP of 3.50 or be on the Honours track.
Cohort 2012 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in TS, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.
Preclusion: TS4880B
Modular credits:15

The Honours Thesis is usually done in the second semester of a student’s registration in the Honours Degree Programme.

Strand: Area Studies/Topics in Theatre (Cohort 2013 and before) / Non-stranded (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite:
Cohort 2012 and before: Completed 110 MCs, including 60 MCs of TS major requirements with a minimum CAP of 3.50.
Cohort 2013-2015: Completed 110 MCs including 60 MCs of TS major requirements with a minimum SJAP of 4.00 and CAP of 3.50, or with recommendation by the programme committee. Students may seek a waiver of the SJAP pre-requisite from the department if they have a minimum CAP of 4.25 after completing 110 MCs.
Cohort 2016 onwards: Completed 110 MCs including 44 MCs of TS major requirements with a minimum SJAP of 4.00 and CAP of 3.50, or with recommendation by the programme committee. Students may seek a waiver of the SJAP pre-requisite from the department if they have a minimum CAP of 4.25 after completing 110 MCs.

Preclusion: TS4660

Note: Please register TS4401 manually with the Department.
Documents containing important information on TS4401 should be downloaded from “Documents and Forms.”
The Independent Study Module is designed to enable the student to explore an approved topic within the discipline in depth. The student should approach a lecturer to work out an agreed topic, readings, and assignments for the module. A formal, written agreement is to be drawn up, giving a clear account of the topic, programme of study, assignments, evaluation, and other pertinent details. The Head’s and/or Honours Coordinator’s approval of the written agreement is required. Regular meetings and reports are expected. Evaluation is based on 100% Continuous Assessment and must be worked out between the student and the lecturer prior to seeking departmental approval.

Strand: Area Studies/Topics in Theatre (Cohort 2013 and before) / Non-stranded (from Cohort 2014)
Pre-requisite:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 100 MCs, including 60 MCs in TS, with a minimum CAP of 3.50.
Cohort 2012-2015: Completed 100 MCs, including 60 MCs in TS, with a minimum CAP of 3.20.
Cohort 2016 onwards: Completed 100 MCs, including 44 MCs in TS, with a minimum CAP of 3.20.

Preclusion: TS4401

Note: Please register TS4660 manually with the Department.
Documents containing important information on TS4660 should be downloaded from “Documents and Forms.”
Edna LIM

In recent years, the vitality and currency of Asian cinema has resulted in texts that can no longer be viewed as merely artefacts of a particular culture or nation. This module looks at how film industries in Asia have engaged with global cinema through various forms of negotiations that assert, compromise or consume national, cultural or conventional distinctions. We assess the implications of a conglomerate Asian cinema by examining the current trend of transnational Asian films, the translatability of conventions and adaptability of ideas within Asia itself as well as between Asia and dominant cinemas like Hollywood.
Independent research plays an important role in graduate education. The Independent Study Module is designed to enable the student to explore an approved topic in Theatre Studies in depth. The student should approach a lecturer to work out an agreed topic, readings, and assignments for the module. A formal, written agreement is to be drawn up, giving a clear account of the topic, programme of study, assignments, evaluation, and other pertinent details. The Head's and/or Graduate Coordinator's approval of the written agreement is required. Regular meetings and reports are expected. Evaluation is based on 100% Continuous Assessment and the balance of written and other components must be worked out between the student and the lecturer prior to seeking departmental approval.

Note:
(1) Word limit: 4,000 – 6,000 words, the lower limit being permissible only where the project involves a substantial amount of practical work, and is agreed with the supervisor.
(2) Workload: Minimum 10 hours per week. The precise breakdown of contact hours, assignment and preparation is to be worked out between the lecturer and the student, subject to Departmental approval.
Independent research plays an important role in graduate education. The Independent Study Module is designed to enable the student to explore an approved topic in Theatre Studies in depth. The student should approach a lecturer to work out an agreed topic, readings, and assignments for the module. A formal, written agreement is to be drawn up, giving a clear account of the topic, programme of study, assignments, evaluation, and other pertinent details. The Head’s and/or Graduate Coordinator’s approval of the written agreement is required. Regular meetings and reports are expected. Evaluation is based on 100% Continuous Assessment and the balance of written and other components must be worked out between the student and the lecturer prior to seeking departmental approval.

Note:
(1) Word limit: 6,000 – 8,000 words, the lower limit being permissible only where the project involves a substantial amount of practical work, and is agreed with the supervisor.
(2) Workload: Minimum 10 hours per week. The precise breakdown of contact hours, assignment and preparation is to be worked out between the lecturer and the student, subject to Departmental approval.
YONG Li Lan

This is a required module for all research Masters and PhD students admitted from Sem 1 of AY2009/2010. The module provides a forum for students and faculty to share their research and to engage one another critically in discussion of their current research projects. The module will include presentations by faculty on research ethics and dissertation writing. Each student is required to present a formal research paper. Active participation in all research presentations is expected. The module may be spread over two semesters and will be graded "Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory" on the basis of student presentation and participation.