Minor in Film Production

Film Production is a very specific practical discipline, requiring detailed and often arduous training in matters such as direction, lighting, sound, film mise-en-scene, editing, production, script writing and related issues. Film production modules are intensive in terms of technical skills, requiring specific technical equipment and facilities in order to inculcate the necessary competence to bring elements of the film into production. Though distinct in focus from a theoretical and critical study of film, some exposure to both fields is benefical. The curriculum for the Minor in Film Production therefore combines training in film production alongside exposure to the core elements of film history, narratology and criticism. This provides students with the foundational knowledge that valuably includes the development of both practical skills and critical insights into the film medium.

The FASS Minor in Film Production offers FASS students the opportunity to take film production classes at the highly-regarded Tisch School of the Arts in New York City. This opportunity has been provided in the form of a student exchange programme (SEP), in which Tisch will accept FASS students for a one semester exchange. Students minoring in Film Production can take full advantage of a valuable overseas learning experience in one of the world’s leading institutions focused on cinema studies.

The Minor in Film Production is open to FASS students from Cohort 2014 and after. Students who declare a Minor in Film Studies will not be allowed to declare a Minor in Film Production, and vice-versa.

NUS exchange students will receive credit for the modules read at Tisch. Grades will also be mapped back to NUS.


Programme Requirements

Pass at least 24 MCs of recognised modules which must include:

  1. EN2203 Introduction to Film Studies
  2. a maximum of 2 modules (8 MCs) drawn from the list of recognised modules in Band A (see below).
  3. the equivalent of at least 3 modules (12 NUS MCs), and no more than 4 modules (16 MCs) drawn from the list of recognised modules in Band B (see below).
  4. List of Recognised Modules **(for Cohort 2015 onwards)

    Band A Modules
    EN2204 Reading the Horror Film or EN3248 Reading the Horror Film
    EN2274 Introduction to Screenwriting
    EN3242 History of Film
    EN3880A History of Non-Western Film
    EN4247 Film Theory
    GES1029 Singapore Film: Performance and Identity
    TS2243 Film Genres: Stars and Styles
    GEH1007 Asian Cinema: The Silent Era
    GEH1009 Framing Bollywood: Unpacking the Magic
    GEH1023 Exploring Chinese Cinema: Shanghai- Hong Kong-Singapore
    JS2216 Postwar Japanese Film and Anime
    MS4207 Malay Film
    SN3274 South Asian Cinema
            

    Band B Modules
    FMTV-UT 4 Language of Film
    FMTV-UT 101 Production Safety and Set Protocol
    FMTV-UT 1095 Producing for Film
    FMTV-UT 146 Performance Strategies for Transfers 
    FMTV-UT 125 The Director’s Process
    * Either:
    • OART-UT 560 Fundamentals of Filmmaking
    or
    • FMTV-UT 43 Sight & Sound Filmmaking
    # Either:
    • FMTV-UT 1084 Script Analysis
    or
    • FMTV-UT 33 Introduction to Dramatic & Visual Writing
    or
    • FMTV-UT 1020 Writing the Short Screenplay

    List of Recognised Modules **(for Cohort 2014 and before)

    Band A Modules
    EN2204 Reading the Horror Film or EN3248 Reading the Horror Film
    EN2274 Introduction to Screenwriting
    EN3242 History of Film
    EN3880A History of Non-Western Film
    EN4247 Film Theory
    GEK1031 American Film
    TS2238/SSA2218 Singapore Film: Performance and Identity
    TS2243/GEM2026 Film Genres: Stars and Styles
    CH2297/GEK2047 Exploring Chinese Cinema: Shanghai- Hong Kong-Singapore
    GEM1049 Asian Cinema: The Silent Era
    GEM1050 Framing Bollywood: Unpacking the Magic
    JS2216 Postwar Japanese Film and Anime
    MS4207 Malay Film
    SN3274 South Asian Cinema
            

    Band B Modules
    FMTV-UT 4 Language of Film
    FMTV-UT 101 Production Safety and Set Protocol
    FMTV-UT 1095 Producing for Film
    FMTV-UT 146 Performance Strategies for Transfers 
    FMTV-UT 125 The Director’s Process
    * Either:
    • OART-UT 560 Fundamentals of Filmmaking
    or
    • FMTV-UT 43 Sight & Sound Filmmaking
    # Either:
    • FMTV-UT 1084 Script Analysis
    or
    • FMTV-UT 33 Introduction to Dramatic & Visual Writing
    or
    • FMTV-UT 1020 Writing the Short Screenplay



    Note:

    * NUS exchange students to Tisch are allowed to take only ONE filmmaking module, EITHER OART-UT 560 Fundamentals of Filmmaking OR FMTV-UT 43 Sight & Sound Filmmaking.

    # NUS exchange students to Tisch are allowed to take only ONE of the listed scriptwriting modules.

    (a)  A maximum of 8 MCs from the minor may be used to fulfil the requirements of a major or another minor.

    Please refer to the guidelines/requirements pertaining to the Minor programmes at the FASS Student Portal and the Registrar's Office (Minor programmes) website.

    (b)  Note to English Literature (EN) Major students who have declared a Minor in Film Production (reading all EN-coded modules to fulfil the Band A requirement)

    For EN Major students who read 2 EN-coded modules (8 MCs) from Band A:
    Since students are allowed a MAXIMUM of 8 MCs to fulfil both the EN Major and Minor in Film Production requirements, this means one of the three EN-coded film modules (i.e. one from the following: EN2203, and two Band A modules) cannot be double-counted towards EN Major requirements.
    Therefore, EN Major students who have declared a Minor in Film Production, and plan to read 2 EN-coded modules (8 MCs) from Band A must read one extra EN-coded module.

    EN Major students should check their GAPS/academic record carefully to ensure that they fulfil all EN Major requirements.

    List of Modules for the Minor in Film Production – Tisch School of the Arts, NYC

    The following table provides detailed information about the Tisch modules listed in the previous section.

    ^The credits listed in this table refer to Tisch module credits (not NUS MCs).

    Module Code Band Assignment NUS Module Code
    Script Analysis# – 4 credits^ FMTV-UT 1084 Band B EN Level 3000
    This class is designed to help the students analyze a film script through both viewing and reading of a script. Plot and character development, character dialogue, foreground, background, and story will all be examined. Using feature films, we will highlight these script elements rather than the integrated experience of the script, performance, directing, and editing elements of the film. Assignments include two script analyses.
    Introduction to Dramatic & Visual Writing# – 4 credits^ FMTV-UT 33 Band B EN2273
    Through lecture and recitation, this class is an intensive examination of the short film and the fundamental grammar of dramatic and visual writing. In the recitation, each student will write and re-write two original screenplays. The first will be 6-8 pages and the second 12-15 pages. These scripts may be used in the future for upper-level (intermediate and advanced) core production classes. In these workshop sessions students will be asked to read each other’s work and give constructive feedback/notes to the writer(s). The lecture will serve as a forum for a comprehensive examination of the “writer’s toolbox.” Through the screening of short films and clips from features as well as the reading of short scripts and sections of feature screenplays, we will explore how preeminent screenwriters use the interplay of visual language, structure, and character to create original, compelling, and emotional stories.
    Writing the Short Screenplay# - 3 credits^ FMTV-UT 1020 Band B EN2274
    This workshop is devoted solely to screenplays from 10-30 minutes in length. Students are assisted in exploring, developing, and writing appropriate material, from idea to finished script. Work can either be in narrative or non-narrative form.
    Language of Film - 3 credits^ FMTV-UT 4 Band B EN Level 3000
    A basic introduction to the study of film, this course gives an overview of the historical development of cinema as an artistic and social force, while at the same time acquaints the students with the aesthetic elements of the cinema, the terminology governing film production, and the lines of critical inquiry that have been developed for the medium. The objective of the course is to equip students, by raising their awareness of the development and complexities of the cinema, to read films as trained and informed viewers. From this base, students can progress to a deeper understanding of film, a greater grasp of the technicalities of film production, and the proper in-depth study of cinema. Readings, screenings, midterm, and final exams.
    Fundamentals of Filmmaking* - 4 credits^ OART-UT 560 Band B NM3230
    This practical workshop is designed to introduce students to the techniques and theory of developing and producing short film ideas that are shot on digital video and edited digitally on computer using Adobe Premiere Pro software. The course centers on learning elements of visual storytelling through a spectrum of aesthetic approaches. Working in crews of four, students learn directing, shooting, and editing skills as they each direct three short videos (three to five minutes in length).
    Sight & Sound Filmmaking* – 6 credits^ FMTV-UT 43 Band B NM3230
    Every student will conceive, produce, direct and edit five short projects (3 silent and 2 with sound) using digital filmmaking technology. Working in crews of four, students will be exposed to a variety of specific assignments in visual storytelling that feature a broad spectrum of technical, aesthetic, craft and logistical problems to be solved. Collaborating with other students through rotating crew positions will be a central focus of all production work. Lectures, labs, critiques, technical seminars, screenings and written production books will be an important component of this class. All student work is screened and discussed in class. Students should not schedule any other course on the same days as Sight & Sound: Filmmaking.
    Production Safety and Set Protocol – 1 credit^ FMTV-UT 101 Band B TS Level 2000
    The purpose of this class is to enhance the artistic, collaborative experience of filmmaking by exposing students to the various skill sets and techniques used in film and television productions, and to familiarize them with the industry's standard of best practices. Learning these basic "nuts and bolts" not only enhances safety and productivity, it enhances our artistic purpose. It gives the Director the time he/she needs to get that extra take, or the additional coverage the editor needs to convey the Director's creative vision. Through a series of lectures, assignments, demonstrations, and hands-on exercises, students will become familiar with the many tools used in physical production, with the goal of fostering their creative vision in a safe and healthful workplace that is both professional and productive.
    Producing for Film - 3 credits^ FMTV-UT 1095 Band B TS Level 3000
    An examination of the creative, organizational, and managerial roles of the producer in narrative motion pictures. Topics include how a production company is formed, creating and obtaining properties, pitching, financing, budgeting, publicity, marketing, and distribution. The course gives specific attention to the problems in these areas that will be faced by students as future professional producers, directors, production managers, or writers. Students construct a plan for a feature project of their choice, incorporating a creative package, production strategy, and a financing strategy. There will be guest speakers and occasional screenings.
    Performance Strategies for Transfers - 3 credits^ FMTV-UT 146 Band B TS Level 3000
    This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the language and culture of acting and to the nature of the relationship between director and performance. By the end of the semester, students should understand something of the history and culture of schools of acting, comprehend a basic vocabulary of the actor and feel confident with the casting and rehearsal process (including 'organic blocking' leading to 'coverage'). They should have attained a basic working knowledge of all areas of creative intent -- script interpretation, performance, visual and aural environments. They should be equipped to talk to actors using accepted language and be able to stimulate the creation of vital, memorable performances on the screen.
    The Director's Process - 3 credits^ FMTV-UT 125 Band B TS Level 3000
    This class is an introduction to the craft of directing. We will take a step-by-step look at the director’s process and responsibilities in this most collaborative of arts. Our focus will include script, character and scene analysis; performance, casting and rehearsal; design and visual style; assembling the final form. We’ll talk about what an actor wants from a director, how to talk to the cinematographer and production/costume designers and why we look at editing as the final rewrite. Through lectures, screenings, assignments and discussions with working professionals, the class will offer a comprehensive foundation for the director on which to build a rich creative experience at Tisch and a long and satisfying professional career thereafter.

    *NUS exchange students to Tisch are allowed to take only ONE filmmaking module, EITHER Fundamentals of Filmmaking OR Sight & Sound Filmmaking.

    # NUS exchange students to Tisch are allowed to take only ONE of the listed scriptwriting modules.

    Tisch proposes the following curriculum to ensure that NUS exchange students benefit from a broad range of cinematic arts training:

    • Up to 18 (Tisch) credits can be taken from the course offerings above. Students may choose one course from the Production Area and one course from the Scriptwriting Area. A combination of the other courses will round out the course selection. • 16 Tisch credits = 20 MC

    Grades and credits

    NUS exchange students will receive credit for the modules read at Tisch. Grades will also be mapped back using the following grade equivalencies.

    Applicable to Film Production Minor students only.

    NUS

    NYU-Tisch

    Number

    Letter

    Letter

    Number

    5.0

    A/A+

    A

    4.0

    4.5

    A-

    A-

    3.7

    4.0

    B+

    B+

    3.3

    3.5

    B

    B

    3.0

    3.0

    B-

    B-

    2.7

    2.5

    C+

    C+

    2.3

    2.0

    C

    C
    *C-

    2.0
    1.7

    1.5

    D+

    D+

    1.3

    1.0

    D

    D

    1.0

    0

    F

    F

    0.0

    NUS students will still be issued the NYU transcript at the end of their semester at Tisch.
    * For Tisch grades of C and C-, NUS students will be assigned the corresponding grade of C.