Global Studies

Baghdad cityscape

MODULE LIST

*SE3880 Topics in Southeast Asian Studies - Theme Classification is variable with Topic
Students who want to read the recognised L5000 Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy (LKYSPP) modules have to submit the Application Form one week before the Module Preference Exercise to the office or via email (globalstudies@nus.edu.sg ).

TIMETABLE for Sem 1 and Sem 2 AY2014-15


THEMES

Global Health and Environment International Communications
Global Economics and Development Technology and Globalisation
Policy Making Colonialism and Post-Colonialism
Business and Transnational Cultures Religion and Ethnicity
War and Security Population and Migration
 
REGIONS
Americas East Asia: China, Japan & Korea
Europe South Asia
  Southeast Asia
 

GL CODED MODULES

GL Core Modules: GL1101E Global Issues, GL2101 Origins of the Modern World, GL2102 Global Political Economy, GL2103 Global Governance and GL3101 Inquiry & Method will be offered every semester beginning AY2014-15.

GL4101 and GL4102 Task Force Modules will be offered beginning AY2015-16. These modules will be offered annually. Students have to read these modules one after the other. The topics to be discussed in these modules will vary annually.

GL1101E Global Issues - CORE MODULE
Modular Credits: 4
Workload: 2-1-0-3-4
This module introduces the emerging field of global studies. Building on ideas about the modern state and international order, it examines how these ideas are being challenged from the perspective of transnational trends and institutions. Among these are the emergence of a global economy, inequalities within and between states, transnational labour and migration, global environmental issues, poverty and development, global consumerism, human rights and global responsibilities, transnational social and political movements, and new patterns of global governance. The module adopts a multidisciplinary approach to reveal different aspects of these issues.

GL2101 Origins of the Modern World - CORE MODULE
Modular Credits: 4
Workload: 2-1-0-3-4
Pre-requisite: GL1101E
This module explores how the contemporary structure of the global system emerged. It studies how a world economy with integrated systems of production and trade emerged from interactions in which ethnic, national, political, and cultural divisions played a crucial role. It also examines the mechanisms through which Europeans and European culture maintained a dominant place through conflicts and crises from the sixteenth century onwards. The period under investigation runs from the Thirteenth Century to the start of the Twentieth.

GL2102 Global Political Economy - CORE MODULE
Modular Credits: 4
Workload: 2-1-0-2-5
Pre-requisite: GL1101E
One aspect of ‘globalization’ is the global character of economic practices such as trade, finance, and economic growth. But those practices rest upon a complex of relations among production, exchange, and power that constitute a global political economy. This module looks at the economic practices that drive globalization through the lens of this broader complex of relations. Drawing on the emerging interdisciplinary social science literature on global political economy, it provides a distinctively global perspective on economic issues such as emerging markets, power shifts in the global economy, global financial governance, and foreign aid.

GL2103 Global Governance - CORE MODULE
Modular Credits: 4
Workload: 2-1-0-2-5
Pre-requisite: GL1101E
This module examines the changing nature of political authority in contemporary world politics. Drawing on what social scientists have to say about international institutions and global governance, it asks critical questions with implications for global order, peace, and justice. To what extent has globalization undermined state sovereignty? Who manages global problems in a post-sovereign world, and by what authority? Through what kinds of institutions and practices are global actors governed? Who and what escapes global governance? How should global problems be managed?

GL3101 Inquiry and Method - CORE MODULE
Modular Credits: 4
Pre-requisite: ARS3 students and above only. GL1101E and one of the following Core Modules: GL2101, GL2102 or GL2103.
Workload: 2-1-0-2-5
This module examines the theories of knowledge and methods of inquiry that are used across disciplines to study globalisation and its effects. It introduces students to the means, materials, techniques, and ethical issues entailed by different methods of inquiry. Four themes recur throughout the module: how questions are formulated and investigations conducted; how language influences inquiry; how context influences inquiry; and how different means, materials, and methods of inquiry can (or cannot) be brought together to provide a more holistic analysis.

GL3550 Global Studies Internship
Modular Credits: 4 MCs
Pre-requisite: Completed a minimum of 24 MCs in GL or GL recognised non-language modules including GL1101E and one of the following Core Modules - GL2101, GL2102, GL2103; and have declared Global Studies as their major.
Workload: NA
Internships vary in length but all take place within organisations or companies, are vetted and approved by the convenor of the global Studies Programme, have relevance to the major in Global Studies, involve the application of subject knowledge and theory in reflection upon the work, and are assessed.

GL4101 Readings in Global Issues - CORE MODULE
Modular Credits: 5
Workload: 0-3-0-4-5.5
Pre-requisite: GL major ONLY. Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in GL or GL recognised modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.20; or be on the Honours track.
This module is a capstone seminar for the Global Studies programme. Each seminar will investigate one specific global issue in depth. Possible topics include legacies of anti-communism, xenophobia, the US war in Iraq, the 2008 financial crisis, climate change, and global poverty.

GL4102 Task Force - CORE MODULE
Modular Credits: 5
Workload: 0-3-0-7-2.5
Pre-requisite: GL major ONLY. Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MC in GL or GL recognised non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.20; or be on the Honours track.
Task Force is an intensive capstone project required for Global Studies majors. The seminar simulates a government advisory committee. Each Task Force seminar deals with a given policy problem from the real world. Students research the problem, investigate and debate solutions, and work together to produce a report that recommends policy solutions. Seminar participants apply the training they have received from the GL curriculum to the project. At the end of the semester, students present their report for evaluation. Potential Task Force problems include energy security, terrorism, human trafficking, and an aging population.

GL4401 Honours Thesis
Modular Credits: 15
Workload: 0-0-0-0-37.5
Pre-requisite: Completed 110 MCs, including 60 MCs in GL or GL recognised non-language modules, with a minimum SJAP of 4.00 and CAP of 3.50. Students may seek a waiver of the SJAP pre-requisite from the department if they have a minimum CAP of 4.25 after completing 110MCs.
Preclusion: GL4660
The Honours Thesis will normally be done in the second semester of the student's final year. The research will normally focus on a topic that combines a student's theme, region, and language focus within the Global Studies major. A qualified student intending to undertake the Honours Thesis will be expected to consult a prospective supervisor in the prededing semester semester for guidance on the selection of a topic and the preparation of a research proposal. The supervisor will provide guidance to the student in conducting the research and writing the thesis of 10,000 to 12,000 words.

GL4660 Independent Study
Modular Credits: 5
Workload: 0-0-0-0-12.5
Pre-requisite: Completed 100 MCs, including 60 MCs in GL or GL recognised non-language modules, with a minimum of 3.20.
Preclusion: GL4401
The Independent Study Module enables a student to explore in depth an approved topic within Global Studies. The student should approach a lecturer to work out an agreed topic, readings, and assignments for the module. A formal, written agreement is to be drawn up, giving a clear account of the topic, programme of study, assignments, evaluation, and other pertinent details. Convenor's and/or Honours coordinator's approval of the written agreement is required. Regular meetings and reports are expected. Evaluation is based on 100% Continuous Assessment and must be worked out between the student and the lecturer prior to seeking departmental approval.

GL4882A Development and the Globalisation of Food
Modular Credits: 5
Workload: 0-3-0-2-7.5
Pre-requisite: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in GL or GL recognised non-language modules, or 28 MCs in PS, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.
The module will be organised around the following four topics. First, the vision of agriculture found in early development thought; second the structural transformations of agriculture in the twentieth century in terms of production and trade; third, an examination of states that have resisted the globalising tide in order to determine whether their domestic policies qualify as "development"; and finally the possibility of decoupling development and globalisation.

GL4883A Conflict and Natural Resources
Modular Credits: 5
Workload: 0-3-0-2-7.5
Pre-requisite: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in GL or GL recognised non-language modules, or 28 MCs in PS, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.
This module examines the role of natural resource endowments and scarcity in national and international conflicts. The course begins with a review of causes of conflict and develops an understanding of how these causes may be linked to natural resource endowments. We then explore how constraints on natural resources such as water and fertile soil increase the potential of environmentally linked violence. Students will explore not only conflict theory, concepts of greed and grievance, and scarcity, but also technical aspects of global environmental change. Finally, the class will explore potential conflict resolution approaches.

GL4886A Citizenship and the Politics of Belonging
Modular Credits: 5
Workload: 0-3-0-2-7.5
Pre-requisite: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in GL or GL recognised non-language modules, or 28 MCs in PS, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.
This module critically examines the various contested definitions, practices, policies and laws of citizenship found around the world. It explores how historical legacies, levels of economic development, regime transformations, political geographies, technological changes, and social forces shape who belongs (and who does not) to a particular political community or nation-state. The module systematically applies key concepts to case studies from around the world to highlight how and why actors bestow, deny, and contest citizenship as well as the policy and normative implications that flow from these processes.