Now published

Empire in Asia: A New Global History

Empire in Asia Members & Contributors

Principal Investigator

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Professor Brian Farrell was the PI for the Empire in Asia project and is Series Editor for these volumes, as well as co-editor for each volume. He is a Professor in the Department of History at the National University of Singapore, where he has been teaching since 1993. His major publications include The Basis and Making of British Grand Strategy 1940-1943: Was There a Plan? (1998) and The Defence and Fall of Singapore 1940-1942 (2005). His main research interests are the nineteenth and twentieth century histories of imperial defence in the British Empire and the Western military experience in Asia, with particular reference to grand strategy and strategic foreign policy. 

Investigators

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A/P Peter Borschberg teaches history at the National University of Singapore. He specializes in Europe-Asian interactions in the early modern period, mainly with a geographic on Southeast Asia. He is the author of several studies including The Singapore and Melaka Straits. Violence, Security and Diplomacy in the Seventeenth Century (2011) as well as Hugo Grotius, the Portuguese and Free Trade in the East Indies (2012). 

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Dr. Jack Fairey's research work deals primarily with the history of the Mediterranean and Eastern Orthodox Christendom, with a particular interest in empires, religion and diplomacy. He was Ted & Elaine Athanassiades Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the Program in Hellenic Studies at Princeton in 2005-6, and has previously taught European, Ottoman and Mediterranean history at the National University of Singapore, and before that at Queens University and York University in Canada.  His most recent publication, The Great Powers and Orthodox Christendom: The Crisis over the Eastern Church in the Era of the Crimean War (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015), examines the role of the Orthodox Church as a locus for competing imperial agendas in the mid-nineteenth-century Ottoman Empire.  The monograph shows how competition between the British, Russian, French, Austrian and Ottoman governments over religious protectorates and clerical privileges contributed first to the outbreak of the Crimean War (1853–56) and then to secularizing reforms in the Ottoman Empire. His other publications have dealt with the impact of religion and imperial ideologies on group identity in the Balkans, as well as with the intersections of British, French, Russian, Austrian, and Ottoman imperialism in the eastern Mediterranean."

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A/P Bruce Lockhart is Associate Professor in the History Department at National University of Singapore. He trained at Cornell University in Southeast Asian history, and his specialization includes both Thailand and Indochina. His primary interest has always been the monarchy, and he has written a monograph on The End of the Vietnamese Monarchy (Yale Council on Southeast Asian Studies, 1993). Currently he is working on a history of constitutional monarchy in Thailand. He has co-authored the third edition of the Historical Dictionary of Vietnam in the Scarecrow Press series and co-edited The Cham of Vietnam: History, Society and Art (NUS Press, 2011). He has also written several journal articles and book chapters on Vietnamese and Lao historiography. As a follow-up to his contribution to this volume, he hopes to look more deeply at French relations with Siam and Cambodia during the reign of King Mongkut (1851-68).

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Dr. Donna Brunero is Senior Lecturer in History at the National University of Singapore. Her research focuses on the intersections between maritime and imperial history, with a particular interest in the colonial port cities of Asia and the treaty ports of China. She has published and has forthcoming works relating to the Chinese Maritime Customs Service, Britons in China, maritime ethnography, and colonial representations of piracy in Asia.  She is the author of Britain's Imperial Cornerstone in China: The Chinese Maritime Customs Service, 1854-1949 (Routledge, 2006) and has a forthcoming edited volume on treaty ports and material culture. Her current research project is on the representations of maritime Asia in the 19th century via East India Company journals.

Publications:
Britain’s Imperial Cornerstone in China: The Chinese Maritime Customs Service, 1854-1949. (London: Routledge, 2006)
• “Archives and Heritage in Singapore: The Development of ‘Reflections at Bukit Chandu’, a World War II Interpretative Centre” International Journal of Heritage Studies, Vol 12, No.5, September 2006.

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Dr. Murari Jha is currently an Assistant Professor in the School of Historical Studies, Nalanda University, India. Earlier he worked as a post doctoral fellow at the Department of History, National University of Singapore. He received training in history at Leiden University, the Netherlands, and Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. His forthcoming monograph deals with the Ganga River, the Mughal empire’s successes and failures along the river, and the interactions between the regional economy along the eastern tracks of the Ganga and the maritime global economy of the Bay of Bengal during 1500 to 1800 CE.

Publications:
•“The Rhythms of the Economy and Navigation along the Ganga River.” In The Sea, Identity and History: From the Bay of Bengal to the South China Sea edited by Satish Chandra and Himanshu Prabha Ray, 221–44. New Delhi: Manohar, 2013
• “The Social World of Gujarati Merchants and their Indian Ocean Networks in the Seventeenth Century.” In The South Asian Diaspora: Transnational Networks and Changing Identities edited by Rajesh Rai and Peter Reeves, 28–44. London: Routledge, 2009.
• The Mughals, Merchants and the European Companies in 17th Century Surat,” Asia Europe Journal 3:2 (2005): 269–83. 

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Dr. Sher Banu Khan is an Assistant Professor in the Malay Studies Department at the National University of Singapore. She received her Advanced Master's degree from Leiden University and her Ph.D. from Queen Mary, University of London. Her research interest is the Malay world and Southeast Asia in general in the early modern period focusing on state-formation, cross-cultural encounters, gender studies and Islam. She has published in numerous journals and chapters in books amongst which are “Ties that Unbind: the Botched Aceh-VOC Alliance for the conquest of Melaka 1640-1641”, Indonesia and the Malay World, “What Happened to Syaiful Rijal?” in Bijdragen tot de taal-, land- en volkenkunde, “Men of Prowess and Women of Piety: The Rule of Sultanah Safiatuddin Syah of Aceh 1641-1675” in Journal of Southeast Asian Studies, and “The Jewel Affair: The Sultanah, her Orangkaya and the Dutch Foreign Envoys”, in M. Feener, P. Daly & A. Reid, (eds) Mapping the Acehnese Past, (KITLV: Leiden, 2011). Her latest book publication is Sovereign Women in a Muslim Kingdom: The Sultanahs of Aceh, 1641-1699, (Cornell University Press, 2017).  

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Dr. Jinping Wang is assistant professor in the Department of History at the National University of Singapore. She works on sociocultural history of middle and late imperial China. She is the author of the forthcoming monograph In the Wake of the Mongols: The Making of a New Social Order in North China, 1200-1600, which will be published by Harvard University Asia Center.

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Dr. John DiMoia is an Assistant Professor in the Department of History at the National University of Singapore NUS). He is the author of Reconstructing Bodies: Biomedicine, Health and Nation-Building in South Korea since 1945 (Stanford UP / Columbia UP WEAI, 2013). Along with Aaron S Moore (Arizona State) and Hiromi Mizuno (Minnestota), he is co-editor of the forthcoming anthology, Re-Engineering Asia, which looks at the break-up of Japanese Empire after 1945, and its subsequent reconfiguration in terms of technical infrastructure and development in post-war East and Southeast Asia.

His current teaching and research areas include (1) the broader history of technology (esp. in EA, 18th century-present), (2) the history of medicine (tropical, global, 18th century-present), and (3) Modern Korea (mid-19th century-present).

Along with his position in the History department, he is an Associate Fellow at Tembusu College / NUS, and a member of the STS cluster. He is working on a new project, a book on energy issues in NE Asia and the Korean peninsula, centering in particular on the decision by South Korea to "go nuclear" in the late 1960s; and the corresponding decision to mobilize this move as an engineering project, allowing it to be sold both domestically and internationally.