Modules

Overview of All Modules

Our students read modules from 7 major categories listed below. Click on an IVLE link to see historical course details, or access the following document for a full list of courses. Note that some modules are listed under more than one category.



History of Philosophy

PH2204/SN2273/GEK2027 Introduction to Indian Thought


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-2-5; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEK2027 & SN2273; Cross-listing(s): GEK2027 & SN2273

Description:

This course is designed to survey the history of Indian philosophy both classical and modern. The course will begin with lectures on the Rig Veda and the Upanishads. It will proceed with the presentation of the main metaphysical and epistemological doctrines of some of the major schools of classical Indian philosophy such as Vedanta, Samkhya, Nyaya, Jainism and Buddhism. The course will conclude by considering the philosophical contributions of some of the architects of modern India such as Rammohan Ray, Rabindrananth Tagore and Mohandas Gandhi. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy, Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH2206/GEK2028 Founders of Modern Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEK2028; Cross-listing(s): GEK2028

Description:

This module looks at the beginnings of modern Western philosophy in the seventeenth century, when philosophers conceived of themselves as breaking away from authority and tradition. It will deal with central themes from the thought of Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Leibniz and Spinoza; in particular, the attempt to provide foundations for knowledge and science. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy, Metaphysics, Epistemology, Mind, Language

IVLE

PH2207 Hume and Kant


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

Two major philosophers are studied in this module: David Hume, in the first half, and Immanuel Kant, in the second. We will try to determine what each philosopher’s fundamental approach to philosophy consists in, and how it gives rise to his views on the nature of causation, the external world, the self, and the limits of knowledge. As Kant’s first Critique was a response to Hume’s philosophical scepticism, we will pay close attention to his diagnoses of Hume’s difficulties and his proposed solutions. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy, Metaphysics, Epistemology, Mind, Language

IVLE

PH2212/GEK2030/EU2214 Introduction to Continental Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-2-5; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): EU2214 & GEK2030; Cross-listing(s): EU2214 & GEK2030

Description:

An introduction to some of the main figures and movements of Continental European Philosophy. The purpose is to provide a broad synoptic view of the Continental tradition with special attention paid to historical development. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy

IVLE

PH2215 Pragmatism


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-4-3; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEK2009; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module looks at pragmatism as a distinctive philosophical perspective, examining the development of pragmatist philosophy from a critique of traditional philosophy, and its influence in contemporary philosophical discourse. The module, intended for students in their second or third year, will introduce the selected works of major pragmatist philosophers such as C.S. Peirce, Josiah Royce, William James, and John Dewey. Each session will cover one or more areas in which pragmatism has contributed new theories and approaches, including metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, social and political philosophy. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy

IVLE

PH2219/EU2222 Critical Theory and Hermeneutics


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-2-5; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): EU2222; Cross-listing(s): EU2222

Description:

This module attempts to trace an intellectual dialogue between two central traditions in twentieth-century European philosophy: the Frankfurt School of Critical Theory and post-Heideggerian Hermeneutics. The module will provide an introduction to the main thinkers of both traditions: we will examine essays of Theodor Adorno, Max Horkheimer, Herbert Marcuse for the Frankfurt School and excerpts from Martin Heidegger, Hans Georg Gadamer and Paul Riceour for the Hermeneuticists. We will also examine different conceptualisations of reason and how both schools are shaped by their attempts to grapple with and respond to the implications of understanding reason as a practice conditioned by particular histories and forms of life. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy

IVLE

PH2222/GEK2036 Greek Philosophy (Socrates and Plato)


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-3-4; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEK2036 & PH3209; Cross-listing(s): GEK2036

Description:

Socrates and Plato stand at the source of the Western Philosophical tradition. Alfred Whitehead said that “the safest general characterisation of the European philosophical tradition is that it consists of a series of footnotes to Plato.” Through a close reading and analysis of several representative Platonic dialogues, this module introduces the student to the philosophy of Plato and Socrates (Plato’s teacher and main interlocutor in his dialogues), and prepares him/her for PH 3222 on Aristotle’s philosophy and the Honours seminar on Greek Thinkers. The module may include material on earlier Philosophy forming the background to Socrates and Plato. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy

IVLE

PH2301 Classical Chinese Philosophy I


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-3-4; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEK2038 & PH2205; Cross-listing(s): GEK2038

Description:

This is the first half of a two-part course which offers an introduction to philosophical debate in the Warring States period of ancient China, the Classical Age of Chinese Philosophy and the seedbed from which grew all of the native currents of thought that survived from traditional China. It will begin by considering the intellectual-historical background to the ancient philosophies and focus primarily on the Confucius (the Analects), Mozi, Yang Zhu, Mencius and Laozi, closing with a brief introduction to some of the later developments that will be covered more fully in Part II. The approach of the course will be both historical and critical, and we will attempt to both situate Classical Chinese philosophical discourse in its intellectual-historical context and to bring out its continuing relevance. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy, Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH2302 Chinese Philosophical Traditions I: Medieval Chinese Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-3-4; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEK2039; Cross-listing(s): GEK2039

Description:

This is the first half of a two-part course on Chinese Philosophy. This module surveys the philosophical discourse of the period from early Han dynasty up to the close of the Tang dynasty. We begin by considering the philosophical developments in Confucianism and Xuan Xue thought. Then, we turn to the arrival of Buddhism in China and survey the transformations in Chinese Buddhist philosophy through the Tang. We will treat these thinkers and their ideas in their proper historical contexts and evaluate their philosophies critically. We will also address and assess the relevance of these ideas to contemporary philosophical debates. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy, Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH2321 Philosophies of Zen (Chan) Buddhism


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEK2046; Cross-listing(s): GEK2046

Description:

This module will cover the development of philosophy and anti-philosophy in the Chan and Zen Buddhist traditions of China and Japan, including their basis in the doctrines of Emptiness, Mind-Only, and of Buddha-nature. Sub-area(s): Asian and Comparative Philosophy, History of Philosophy

IVLE

PH3207/EU3227 Continental European Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-1-6; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): EU3227; Cross-listing(s): EU3227

Description:

Using Existentialism as a springboard, the module discusses recent movements in Continental Philosophy. Objectives: (i) Introduce major movements in Continental Philosophy; (ii) Promote understanding of the characteristics of Continental Philosophy; (iii) Encourage further study in Continental Philosophy. Topics include existentialism, structuralism and post-structuralism. Target students include all those wanting to major in philosophy and those wanting to have some knowledge of European philosophy. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy

IVLE

PH3217 Women in Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): One PH module; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module deals with philosophy by women (e.g. Christine de Pisan, Hildegaard von Bingen, Mary Wollstonecraft, Ban Zhao, Iris Murdoch, Martha Nussbaum) and philosophy about women, to counter the perceived neglect of these in many philosophical discourses. Students are encouraged to reflect critically about their own experiences as men and women who live in a gendered world, to think through the implications of gender: how women’s experience may challenge some fundamental assumptions regarding human nature, femininity and masculinity, sexuality and the body, public and private life, subjectivity and representation. We will explore how these challenges to philosophy may be met. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy

IVLE

PH3222 Greek Philosophy (Aristotle)


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-3-4; Prerequisite(s): PH2222; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

Aristotle is one of the two most important ancient Greek philosophers. This module complements the Level-2000 module, PH 2222 Greek Philosophy (Socrates and Plato), and adds to the preparation for the Honours seminar on Greek Thinkers. Readings will be selected from various works representing the wide range of Aristotle’s philosophical interests and achievements. In-depth exploration of a specific area (e.g. metaphysics, or ethics) or topic (e.g. theory of the soul or practical wisdom) will focus on one or two key texts. The module may include later Hellenistic philosophy (e.g. Epicureanism, stoicism, or scepticism) or contemporary development of Aristotle’s philosophy. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy

IVLE

PH3301 Classical Chinese Philosophy II


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-3-4; Prerequisite(s): PH2301; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This is the second part of a two part course which offers an introduction to philosophical debate in the Warring States period of ancient China, the Classical Age of Chinese Philosophy and the seedbed from which grew all of the native currents of thought that survived from traditional China. Continuing from Part I, we will be discussing Later Mohist Logic, Gongsun Long and other ‘Sophists’, Zhuangzi, Xunzi and Hanfeizi in this module. The approach of the course will be both historical and critical, and we will attempt to both situate Classical Chinese philosophical discourse in its intellectual-historical context and to bring out its continuing relevance. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy, Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH3302 Chinese Philosophical Traditions II


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-3-4; Prerequisite(s): PH2302; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This second half of a two-part course on Chinese Philosophical Traditions focuses on Early Modern Chinese Philosophy. This module focuses on the changes in the Confucian tradition between the late Tang through the Qing. We cover the main figures in Neo-Confucianism, and examine in detail the philosophies of Zhu Xi (1130-1200) and Wang Yangming (1472-1529). We close with a discussion of the philological turn in the Qing dynasty. We treat these thinkers and their ideas in their proper historical contexts and evaluate their philosophies critically. We also address and assess the relevance of these ideas to contemporary philosophical debates. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy, Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH3303 Modern Chinese Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-3-4; Prerequisite(s): At least one Chinese Philosophy module (PH2301 OR PH2302) or Lecturer’s permission; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module is intended for students usually in their third year, preferably with some basic knowledge of Chinese Philosophy. It will study the key Chinese Philosophical debates from the nineteenth century to the present. This is a period dominated by China’s encounter with the Modern West, giving rise to criticisms of its own philosophical traditions and attempts to modernize them. New philosophical movements, such as Chinese Marxism also grew from that intellectual ferment. Both Chinese and Western philosophers’ works will be considered. The core reading materials will be in English, but there may be a few optional readings in Chinese. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy, Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH3304 Daoist Traditions


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): PH2301 OR GEK2039; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

An exploration of the ancient mystical and philosophical aspects of Daoism as well as the living religious tradition, their relationships to each other, and their expression in Chinese culture and civilization. Topics include the Daodejing, Zhuangzi, the Daoist Canon (Dao zang), meditation, immortality, alchemy, and ritual. Students read the major Daoist philosophical classics in a broader historical context, and gain knowledge and understanding of the religious and other aspects of Daoism in relation to the philosophy. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy, Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH4209 Greek Thinkers


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH or 28 MCs in EU/LA(French/German/Spanish)/recognized modules or 28 MCs in GL/GL recognized non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

An examination of selected texts from the pre-Socratic philosophers, Plato, Aristotle, as well as philosophers of the Stoic, Epicurean and Sceptic schools of thought. The emphasis may vary from year to year, and may focus on ethics, epistemology, metaphysics, logic, or philosophy of mind. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy

IVLE

PH4214 Recent Continental European Philosophy


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH or 28 MCs in GL/GL recognized non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Preclusion(s): EU4223; Cross-listing(s): EU4223

Description:

The module examines at least one recent movement in Continental European Philosophy. Recently, the module has been concerned with Philosophical Hermeneutics. Objectives: (i) Promote understanding of the main arguments in one or more of the recent movements in Continental Philosophy; (ii) Familiarise students with the main debates; (iii) Encourage further work in Continental Philosophy. Topics covered include hermeneutics, Critical Theory and post-structuralism. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy

IVLE

PH4217 History of Philosophy


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module aims to examine specific philosophical topics or issues (e.g. causation, the nature of mind, moral motivation) from a historical perspective. The topics or issues in question may be examined within the framework of different philosophical traditions (e.g. Chinese, Indian and Western), or across traditions. It is aimed at providing philosophy students with an understanding and appreciation of the history of the discipline, so that they gain a wider perspective, and can better locate current philosophical debates in the context of broader movements in intellectual history. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy

IVLE

PH5650/PH5650R Topics in Continental Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 0-3-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Offered to Graduate students only and admission of others by permission of instructor; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

The module will intensively study a major movement in twentieth century Continental Philosophy. The module will consider phenomenology, hermeneutics, deconstruction or postmodernism. Other topics from the Continental tradition or a combination of more than one topic may also be considered under exceptional circumstances. Focus will be on the historical development and contemporary uses of the movement under consideration. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy

IVLE

PH6210 Topics In History Of Western Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 0-3-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Offered to Graduate students only and admission of others by permission of instructor.; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

The module will intensively examine a historical period in Western Philosophy. Historical traditions that may be studied may include (but is not restricted to) Greek Philosophy, Medieval Philosophy, Early Modern Philosophy, Twentieth-Century Analytic Philosophy, and Twentieth Century Continental Philosophy. The module will especially attend to the major philosophical problems that define each of these historical frameworks. The relations between the major thinkers of the period under consideration will be profiled. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy

IVLE

PH6320 Traditions in Asian Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 0-3-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Offered to Graduate students only and admission of others by permission of instructor. ; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

The module will intensively examine philosophical traditions from the histories of Chinese or Indian Philosophy. Traditions may include (but is not restricted to) Confucianism, Taoism, neo-Confucianism, Legalism from Chinese Philosophy and Vedanta, Indian Buddhism, Nyaya, modern Indian philosophy from the Indian tradition. The emphasis will be on the building of a solid foundation in the philosophical grammar of a non-Western philosophical tradition. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy, Asian, Comparative

IVLE




Value Theory

PH2202 Major Political Philosophers


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module will introduce students to some of the major political philosophers in the Western tradition by examining their different views on such issues as the nature and basis of justice, its relation to equality and liberty, the justification of the state, and the basis of political obligation. Sub-area(s): Value Theory

IVLE

PH2203 Major Moral Philosophers


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

Description: This module will introduce students to some of the major moral philosophers in the Western tradition by examining their different approaches to the question of what we should do or how we should be, including deontological, consequentialist and virtue-based approaches. We will critically analyze these philosophers’ approaches using historical and contemporary sources. Sub-area(s): Value Theory

IVLE

PH2208/GEK2029 Applied Ethics


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEK2029; Cross-listing(s): GEK2029

Description:

This module considers some of the significant normative ethical theories in the history of moral philosophy and examines how their principles may be applied to ethical issues of practical concern. There is a wide range of topics that are typically understood to come under the category of applied ethics. These include ethical issues pertaining to the family, food, race relations, poverty, punishment, conduct in war, professional conduct in general, and so on. The specific topics to be dealt with may vary from semester to semester, and the selection will be announced at the start of the semester in which the module is offered. Sub-area(s): Value Theory

IVLE

PH2209 Philosophy of Art


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEK2002; Cross-listing(s): GEK2002

Description:

Art and aesthetics raises deep philosophical puzzles. Sunsets are beautiful because they’re pleasing. But they seem pleasing because they’re beautiful. Gallaries display some things because they’re art. But some things are art because gallaries display them. Just as the Mona Lisa resembles Lisa, she resembles it. But she does not represent it as it represents her. When one watches a horror film one feels fear, but one does not run away. When one listens to instrumental music one feels sad, but there’s nothing one is sad about. This course addresses the central philosophical questions with which these puzzles are entangled.

IVLE

PH2216 Environmental Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEK2031 & UPI2205; Cross-listing(s): GEK2031

Description:

This module will provide an introduction to some standard accounts of how humans ought to relate to the natural environment. We begin by examining the issue of whether only humans are entitled to moral consideration, and go on to consider what other objects might be deserving of such consideration. We then explore how our attitude towards the natural world is shaped by what we take to be morally considerable. Sub-area(s): Value Theory

IVLE

PH2217 Computerisation and Ethics


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEK2032; Cross-listing(s): GEK2032

Description:

This module will examine certain ethical issues that arise from the impact of computerisation on human life and society. In any given semester, questions that are relevant to this module will be selected from the wide range of those that are confronted by computer professionals, users, policy-makers, and generally the person on the street whose quality of life may either be enhanced or diminished as a result of wide-scale computerisation in a local or global context. Examples of topics that may be confronted are those pertaining to the moral obligations of the computer professional, the justification of intellectual property rights, and issues concerning hacking. Sub-area(s): Value Theory

IVLE

PH2218 Business Ethics


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEK2033; Cross-listing(s): GEK2033

Description:

This module will help students identify and think critically about the ethical dimensions of markets and business organizations and provide tools for making informed and ethically responsible decisions relating to workplace issues. Specific topics may include justifications for free markets and government intervention, corporate governance and economic democracy, managerial compensation, price discrimination, hiring discrimination, employment at will, privacy and safety in the workplace, advertising, product liability, the environment, whistle-blowing, and international business. Sub-area(s): Value Theory

IVLE

PH2220 Social Philosophy and Policy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEK2034; Cross-listing(s): GEK2034

Description:

This module is a study of the different ways societies organize their political, economic, and other social institutions, with an emphasis on the philosophical principles that justify (or don’t) alternative social arrangements. Topics will include different systems of social organization (capitalism, socialism, and democracy), specific policies (taxation, redistribution), and related normative concepts and theories (feminism, individualism, collectivism, community, freedom, equality, rule of law). Sub-area(s): Value Theory

IVLE

PH2221 Medical Ethics


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEK2035 & PH2208 (only semester 1, AY2008/09); Cross-listing(s): GEK2035

Description:

This module will help students identify and think critically about the ethical dimensions of the medical profession and the provision of medical care and provide tools for making informed and ethically responsible decisions relating to healthcare issues. Specific topics may include the ethics of abortion, euthanasia, physician assisted suicide, physician-patient relationships, organ procurement, bio-medical research, etc. Sub-area(s): Value Theory

IVLE

PH2224 Philosophy and Film


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-2-1-4; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEK2040 & PH2880A; Cross-listing(s): GEK2040

Description:

“Philosophy and Film” means, in part, philosophy of film, in part, philosophy in film. Philosophy of film is a sub-branch of aesthetics; many questions and puzzles about the nature and value of art have filmic analogues. (Plato’s parable of the cave is, in effect, the world’s first philosophy of film.) Philosophy in film concerns films that may be said to express abstract ideas, even arguments. (Certain films may even be thought-experiments, in effect.) Questions: are philosophical films good films? Are they good philosophy? The module is intended for majors but – film being a popular medium – will predictably appeal to non-majors as well. (This module is offered as special topics only) Sub-area(s): Value Theory

IVLE

PH3202 Philosophy of Law


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): LL4639E, LL4404 or an equivalent course; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module examines the relationship between law and morality. Is there a necessary connection between law and morality? Must a valid law, or legal system, satisfy certain minimal moral requirements? Is there a moral obligation to obey a valid law, irrespective of its content, or is there a significant difference between moral obligation and legal obligation? How should a judge decide hard cases where no legal rule applies? Should these decisions be based on sound moral considerations? The module will discuss these issues in the light of contemporary debates in legal and political theory, and in the context of some important texts. Sub-area(s): Value Theory

IVLE

PH3203 Moral Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module is concerned with an area in Moral Philosophy called ‘meta-ethics’. Meta-ethics is a discussion of the nature of ethics. It is a second-order, reflective activity about ethics, and not a first-order discussion of the rights and wrongs of particular issues within ethics. Beginning with non-naturalism, the module proceeds to discuss emotivism, prescriptivism, descriptivism or naturalism, culminating in current discussion of moral realism. Sub-area(s): Value Theory

IVLE

PH3213 Knowledge, Modernity and Global Change


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module focuses on the ways in which modern science and technology impact on the forms-of-life which cultures and societies have built up for their collective self-understanding and biological survival. Issues in epistemology and how changes in the concept of “reason” have contributed to the project of modernity will be explored. The role of technology in its simultaneous creation and destruction of social-material wealth will also be considered. This discussion will be tied to an examination of certain key issues in environmental ethics, social theory, and cultural studies. Sub-area(s): Value Theory

IVLE

PH3214 Philosophy and Literature


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

The course will consider, side by side, certain `philosophical’ works of literature and more orthodox philosophical works. The idea is to explore the ways and degrees to which it makes sense – also, the ways and degrees to which it does not make sense – to say that this work of fiction (a novel, say) is really about the same thing that this philosophical text is about. Turning the point around: when philosophers – like Plato or Nietzsche – employ literary techniques more characteristic of fiction, what philosophical work is hereby done? Sub-area(s): Value Theory

IVLE

PH3216 Comparative Environmental Ethics


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module examines how various traditions, both East and West, perceive the relationship between humans and the natural world. It will compare how, e.g., Christianity, the secular West, Hinduism, Taoism and Confucianism conceive of this relation. Commonalities and differences in the respective approaches will be discussed and highlighted. Sub-area(s): Value Theory, Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH3220 Philosophy of Culture


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

Through a historical study and conceptual analysis of the idea, this module aims to achieve a clearer understanding of what we and others mean by culture, how the term operates differently in different discourses. It will explore various philosophical views regarding the possibility, preconditions, and methods for intercultural encounters and understanding, and the relevance of culture for philosophising. Selected issues in specific philosophical areas, in which culture plays a major role, may also be included. Sub-area(s): Value Theory

IVLE

PH3230 Normative Ethical Theory


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module is a study of the main contending contemporary views about goodness and virtue, principles of moral evaluation, and moral decision-making. These include deontological, consequentialist, and contemporary virtue-based and contractarian theories. Emphasis will be placed on securing a thorough understanding the arguments used to derive fundamental moral principles and to justify claims about our moral obligations. Such study aims to reveal the kinds of issues that are involved in analyzing what constitutes rational considerations for moral action, and the strengths and weaknesses of the rival theories. Sub-area(s): Value Theory

IVLE

PH4202 Political Philosophy


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH or 28 MCs in PS, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module will discuss some of the central issues in political philosophy such as the basis and limits of toleration and individual liberty, the importance of a shared morality, and the role of the state in meeting the claims of different conceptions of what a worthwhile life should be. In plural societies, with a diversity of different values, what would be a fair basis for social co-operation? Sub-area(s): Value Theory

IVLE

PH4203 Issues in Moral Philosophy


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MCs, including 28MCs in PH or 28 MCs in NM, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module examines different issues in meta-ethics or normative ethics. It asks questions such as: Can ought be derived from is? Are there natural laws? Is morality about an agent’s character or actions? Are actions morally justified by consequences or compliance with moral laws or principles? It may also examine and assess different schools of moral philosophy, such as utilitarianism, Kantian ethics or virtue ethics, or a current debate among moral philosophers, for example, the nature and role of intuition, or emotions, in acting morally. Sub-area(s): Value Theory

IVLE

PH4216 Topics in Environmental Philosophy


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module will involve a critical and thorough discussion of specific topics in environmental philosophy. These may include topics in both Eastern and Western environmental traditions. Examples of topics that may be discussed are: the ethical problem of future generations, intrinsic values in nature, varieties of eco-feminism, and ecology in Neo-Confucian thought. Environmental issues are now in the forefront of global attention. Our current environmental problems may arguably be said to ultimately trace their roots to (implicit) metaphysical assumptions, to cultural or religious attitudes towards the natural world, to ethical perspectives that do not accord moral consideration to non-humans. Sub-area(s): Value Theory

IVLE

PH4243 Issues in Aesthetics


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module will explore in depth an advanced topic in aesthetics. Possible topics are the ontology of art, the nature of the imagination, the definition of art, subjectivism about beauty, relativism about taste, or the appreciation of nature. Alternatively, we may consider the aesthetics of a particular artform, such as music, film, fiction, painting or dance, or of a particular philosopher, such as Immanuel Kant or Nelson Goodman. Finally, we may consider issues that arise at the intersection of aesthetics and other areas in philosophy, such as the debate over fictionalism in metaphysics.

IVLE

PH5420 Advanced Political Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 0-3-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module invites students to engage in normative thinking about a range of issues related to politics, most of which have to do with questions about the legitimate exercise of political power. We will consider liberal views of political legitimacy and various criticisms of these views. These debates concern issues such as liberty, equality, moral values, and rights. Sub-area(s): Value Theory

IVLE

PH5430 Ethics


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 0-3-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Offered to Graduate students only and admission of others by permission of instructor; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

The module will focus on the sustained study of ethical theory involving one or more of the following four theoretical approaches to ethics: Utilitarianism, Deontology, Virtue Theory and Contractarianism. If necessary, the module may additionally study applications of the theory/ theories to a variety of applied issues. Sub-area(s): Value Theory

IVLE

PH6216 Advanced Environmental Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 0-3-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil (Those who are not graduate students in NUS’s Dept. of Phil. must obtain instructor’s approval.); Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module involves an advanced examination of some key ethical positions in environmental philosophy. It will focus on the meta-ethical questions raised in respect of the different ethical positions. Coverage of these positions will be both wide and deep. Sub-area(s): Value Theory

IVLE

PH6243 Advanced Aesthetics


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 0-3-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Offered to Graduate students only and admission of others by permission of instructor.; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module will explore in depth an advanced topic in aesthetics. Possible topics are the ontology of art, the nature of the imagination, the definition of art, subjectivism about beauty, relativism about taste, or the appreciation of nature. Alternatively, we may consider the aesthetics of a particular artform, such as music, film, fiction, painting or dance, or of a particular philosopher, such as Immanuel Kant or Nelson Goodman. Finally, we may consider issues that arise at the intersection of aesthetics and other areas in philosophy, such as the debate over fictionalism in metaphysics.

IVLE




Metaphysics, Epistemology, Philosophy of Mind, Philosophy of Language

GEK2041/GET1025 Science Fiction and Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-2-1-4; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): PH2225; Cross-listing(s): GET1025

Description:

This module considers science fiction as a mode of philosophical inquiry. Science fiction stories are used to examine fundamental questions of metaphysics, epistemology and ethics. Topics include the nature of time, space, religion, nature, mind, and the future. Specific topics may include such issues as genetic enhancement, environmental ethics, and implications of encounters with non-human life forms.

Sub-area(s): Metaphysics, Epistemology, Mind, Language

IVLE

PH2206/GEK2028 Founders of Modern Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEK2028; Cross-listing(s): GEK2028

Description:

This module looks at the beginnings of modern Western philosophy in the seventeenth century, when philosophers conceived of themselves as breaking away from authority and tradition. It will deal with central themes from the thought of Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Leibniz and Spinoza; in particular, the attempt to provide foundations for knowledge and science. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy, Metaphysics, Epistemology, Mind, Language

IVLE

PH2207 Hume and Kant


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

Two major philosophers are studied in this module: David Hume, in the first half, and Immanuel Kant, in the second. We will try to determine what each philosopher’s fundamental approach to philosophy consists in, and how it gives rise to his views on the nature of causation, the external world, the self, and the limits of knowledge. As Kant’s first Critique was a response to Hume’s philosophical scepticism, we will pay close attention to his diagnoses of Hume’s difficulties and his proposed solutions. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy, Metaphysics, Epistemology, Mind, Language

IVLE

PH2211 Philosophy of Religion


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module will introduce students to the main issues in contemporary philosophy of religion. Topics covered will be selected from the following (other topics may also be considered): arguments for the existence of God (cosmological, ontological, teleological), argument for atheism (problem of evil), religious pluralism, nature of mystical experiences, the nature of miracles, the nature of religious language. Sub-area(s): Metaphysics, Epistemology, Mind, Language

IVLE

PH2213 Metaphysics


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

Broadly speaking, Metaphysics is the study of fundamental conceptual categories, including that of space and time, appearance and reality, mind and body, substance and existence, objects and their properties, and God. These concepts pertain to the structure of “ultimate reality” and generate perplexing philosophical issues, a sample of which will be discussed in this course. Some topics: the problem of universals, paradoxes of the infinite, the concept of God, paradoxes of time travel, problems of cause and effect, free will, fatalism and determinism, the mind-body problem, realism and idealism, existence, identity, and individuation, essentialism, the relation between logic and metaphysics. Sub-area(s): Metaphysics, Epistemology, Mind, Language

IVLE

PH2241 Philosophy of Mind


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): PH3212; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

What is the nature of mind and its relation to physical body? The mental realm is among the last great unknowns in the modern view of sentient beings and their place in the Universe and is a fertile field of philosophical inquiry. This module examines central conceptual issues surrounding the idea of mind and its relation to physical body. These include the distinction between the mental and the physical, the nature of consciousness, personal identity, disembodied existence, mental representation, and the attempt to tame the mental in purely physical terms. Sub-area(s): Metaphysics, Epistemology, Mind, Language

IVLE

PH2242 Philosophy of Language


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

Topics in the philosophy of language, especially concerning truth, meaning and reference. In particular, we will consider questions such as but not limited to whether language is mediated by convention or intention, whether understanding a language is tacitly knowing a theory of that language, whether the meaning of a name is simply its referent, whether mathetmatical and moral statements are true in virtue of meaning and whether sentences such as “breaking promises is wrong” are statements of moral fact or simply expressions of emotion.

IVLE

PH2243 Epistemology


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): PH3211; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

Epistemology is the study of knowledge. Epistemologists want to know what knowledge is, how we acquire it, and how we should respond to arguments for philosophical scepticism, according to which there is very little that we know. We shall read the works of philosophers who have grappled with such perennial issues in philosophy, and explore and discuss various theories of knowledge. Along the way, we shall also discuss related issues having to do with justification, rationality, and the reliability of memory, testimony, intuition, sensory perception, and inductive reasoning.

IVLE

PH3206 Recent Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module looks at the development of twentieth century analytic philosophy through the works of some of its major exponents. These include Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Moore, Austin and Quine. The fundamental assumption in analytic philosophy is the idea that all philosophical problems are really problems of language and may be solved either by reformulating them in a perfect language or by a better understanding of the language that we actually speak. One of the aims of this course is to show how certain problems in ethics, metaphysics and epistemology may be solved (or dissolved) through the careful analysis of language and meaning. Sub-area(s): Metaphysics, Epistemology, Mind, Language

IVLE

PH3241 Consciousness


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): PH2241 or PH2242 or PH3210; Preclusion(s): PH3212; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

One of the main problems of consciousness concerns whether consciousness can be explained solely in terms of brain activity and the like. Some philosophers think so. After all, science has successfully explained various cognitive functions in such terms, and it’s natural to think that its success will eventually extend to consciousness. Other philosophers disagree, find it hard to fathom how consciousness can arise from the purely physical. To help us decide which answer is correct, we shall examine various important positions on the nature of consciousness including physicalism, dualism, eliminativism, and idealism.

IVLE

PH3242 The Self


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): PH2213 or PH2241; Preclusion(s): ; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

The self is a philosophical crossroads where mind, metaphysics, and morals come together to bear on questions of profound interest to all who partake of the human condition. Topics to be covered include the spatial and temporal boundaries of the self, the rationality (or otherwise) of the fear of death, the idea that the self is an illusion, the idea that it is a social construction, and the relative importance of biology, psychology, and phenomenology to the question of who we are.

IVLE

PH3243 Chance and Uncertainty


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): PH2110/GEM2006 or PH2201/GEM2025 or PH2243 or PH3211; Preclusion(s): ; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

We often appeal to probabilistic notions in everyday life. We say things such as “it’ll probably rain later”, “it’s unlikely that an asteroid will collide with Earth any time soon”, and “There’s a chance that the restuarant will be open”. But what exactly is probability? We shall investigate various answers to this question by looking at various theories of probability, including the subjective theory, the epistemic theory, the frequency theory, and the propensity theory. Along the way, we’ll see how issues in the philosophy of probability bear on issues in the philosophy of science, metaphysics, and epistemology.

IVLE

PH3244 Appearance and Reality


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): PH2113 or PH2241 or PH2242; Preclusion(s): ; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

Plato holds that the world of sensible objects is a mere shadow of an ideal realm that transcends experience. Locke maintains that sensible objects have intrinsic natures that are exhausted by a small number of basic spatial and temporal properties. Kant argues that we can never know the natures of things in themselves, beyond the fact that they give us certain sense-impressions. Mill construes a physical object as a bare propensity for sensations to occur in certain patterns. In this module, students engage with the major metaphysical systems of Western philosophy, examining how each coordinates subjective experience with objective reality.

IVLE

PH3245 Language and Thought


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): PH2241/PH3212 or PH2242/PH3210.; Preclusion(s): ; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

Description: Topics at the intersection of philosophy of mind and language, such as whether thought depends on talk or vice versa, whether we think in words or images, whether those words are words of English or a sui generis mental language just for thinking, whether animals which can’t talk can think and whether the mind is like a computer. These questions are central to contemporary philosophy and language and are also an important case study in the relationship between the methods of analysis, experiment and introspection in philosophical psychology.

IVLE

PH3248 Social and Formal Epistemology


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): PH2111/GEK2048 or PH2243; Preclusion(s): ; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

Traditional epistemology has focused on the individual knower and tends to deploy conceptual analysis as the main tool for investigating the concept of knowledge. This module surveys recent challenges to this model of analyzing knowledge, which arise from two new types of epistemology: social and formal epistemology. Social epistemology places special emphasis on the uniquely social dimensions of knowledge, such as the communication of knowledge through the testimony of others. Formal epistemology complements this approach by bringing formal (e.g., probabilistic) methods to bear on such topics as corroborating and conflicting eyewitness testimony, belief polarization, and pluralistic ignorance.

IVLE

PH4207 Phenomenology


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH or 28 MCs in EU/ LA(French/German/Spanish)/recognised modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This course will deal with the thought of the four major classical phenomenologists: Edmund Husserl, Martin Heidegger, Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Jean Paul Sartre. Readings will be selected from Husserl’s Ideas and Cartesian Meditations, Heidegger’s Being and Time, Merleau-Ponty’s Phenomenology of Perception and Sartre’s Being and Nothingness. Sub-area(s): Metaphysics, Epistemology, Mind, Language

IVLE

PH4211 Issues in Epistemology


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module will explore an advanced topic in epistemology in depth. Some possible topics are the problem of scepticism, including realist and anti-realist responses to it, the nature of certainty and the relationship of knowledge to chance and credence, the internalism versus externalism debate about the nature of knowledge and justification, and the definability of knowledge in terms of truth, belief, justification and their cognates. The module may also explore a problem from formal epistemology, such as the lottery paradox, the problem of logical omniscience, or probabilistic approaches to the problem of induction. Sub-area(s): Metaphysics, Epistemology, Mind, Language

IVLE

PH4212/PH6760 Issues in Philosophy of Mind


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module will explore in depth an advanced topic in the philosophy of mind. Possible topics are the unity of consciousness, the relationship between consciousness and time and the relationship between phenomenology and intentionality. The course may also focus on alternative conceptions of the mind to physicalism, such as dualism, panpsychism, or phenomenalism, issues from the philosophy of perception, such as the problems of illusion, hallucination, and the inverted spectra, or issues from philosophical psychology and cognitive science, such as the modularity of mind, the nature of tacit knowledge, or the relationship between neural states and mental states. Sub-area(s): Metaphysics, Epistemology, Mind, Language

IVLE

PH4215 Freedom and Moral Responsibility


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-3-6.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Preclusion(s): PH4210; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

The self image of human beings as morally responsible agents to which praise and blame may be legitimately ascribed and entities to which autonomy and dignity might be attributed appear conditioned upon our having a robust freedom to will and to do. But do we really have such a freedom? And just what is presupposed in the area of free will by our practice of assigning moral responsibility to each other in the first place? Through discussing a series of seminal writings on the topic, the student is introduced to the philosophical controversies in the area of freedom and moral responsibility. Sub-area(s): Metaphysics, Epistemology, Mind, Language, Value Theory

IVLE

PH4240 Issues in Metaphysics


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module will explore in depth some advanced topics in metaphysics. Some possible topics include whether similar things have universals in common, whether time flows, whether past and future exist, whether a whole is something over and above the sum of its parts, whether chance is objective, whether there are other possible worlds, and whether numbers, gods, or chairs and tables exist.

IVLE

PH4242 Issues in Philosophy of Language


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module will explore in depth some advanced topics in philosophy of language. Possible topics are the nature of truth, Dummettian anti-realism, contextualism, relativism, or two-dimensionalism. We may also consider the application of philosophy of language to issues in other areas of philosophy, such as the debate between cognitivists and non-cognitivists in metaethics, or the question of whether metaphysical disputes are merely verbal.

IVLE

PH6540 Topics in Analytic Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 0-3-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Offered to Graduate students only and admission of others by permission of instructor; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

The module is designed to provide an intensive grounding in one of the major areas in contemporary Analytic Philosophy. The module will consider philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, epistemology, or metaphysics. Other topics from the analytic tradition or a combination of more than one topic may also be considered under exceptional circumstances. Focus will be on contemporary issues and problems currently engaging the philosophers belonging to the analytic tradition. Sub-area(s): Metaphysics, Epistemology, Mind, Language

IVLE




Asian and Comparative Philosophy

PH2204/SN2273/GEK2027 Introduction to Indian Thought


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-2-5; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEK2027 & SN2273; Cross-listing(s): GEK2027 & SN2273

Description:

This course is designed to survey the history of Indian philosophy both classical and modern. The course will begin with lectures on the Rig Veda and the Upanishads. It will proceed with the presentation of the main metaphysical and epistemological doctrines of some of the major schools of classical Indian philosophy such as Vedanta, Samkhya, Nyaya, Jainism and Buddhism. The course will conclude by considering the philosophical contributions of some of the architects of modern India such as Rammohan Ray, Rabindrananth Tagore and Mohandas Gandhi. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy, Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH2301 Classical Chinese Philosophy I


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-3-4; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEK2038 & PH2205; Cross-listing(s): GEK2038

Description:

This is the first half of a two-part course which offers an introduction to philosophical debate in the Warring States period of ancient China, the Classical Age of Chinese Philosophy and the seedbed from which grew all of the native currents of thought that survived from traditional China. It will begin by considering the intellectual-historical background to the ancient philosophies and focus primarily on the Confucius (the Analects), Mozi, Yang Zhu, Mencius and Laozi, closing with a brief introduction to some of the later developments that will be covered more fully in Part II. The approach of the course will be both historical and critical, and we will attempt to both situate Classical Chinese philosophical discourse in its intellectual-historical context and to bring out its continuing relevance. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy, Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH2302 Chinese Philosophical Traditions I: Medieval Chinese Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-3-4; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEK2039; Cross-listing(s): GEK2039

Description:

This is the first half of a two-part course on Chinese Philosophy. This module surveys the philosophical discourse of the period from early Han dynasty up to the close of the Tang dynasty. We begin by considering the philosophical developments in Confucianism and Xuan Xue thought. Then, we turn to the arrival of Buddhism in China and survey the transformations in Chinese Buddhist philosophy through the Tang. We will treat these thinkers and their ideas in their proper historical contexts and evaluate their philosophies critically. We will also address and assess the relevance of these ideas to contemporary philosophical debates. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy, Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH2321 Philosophies of Zen (Chan) Buddhism


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEK2046; Cross-listing(s): GEK2046

Description:

This module will cover the development of philosophy and anti-philosophy in the Chan and Zen Buddhist traditions of China and Japan, including their basis in the doctrines of Emptiness, Mind-Only, and of Buddha-nature. Sub-area(s): Asian and Comparative Philosophy, History of Philosophy

IVLE

PH3204/SN3272 Issues in Indian Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-2-5; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): SN3272; Cross-listing(s): SN3272

Description:

This course is designed to survey developments in Indian Philosophy in post-independence India. Figures may include, among others, Radhakrishnan, K. C. Bhattacharya, Kalidas Bhattacharya, J. N. Mohanty, Bimal Krishna Matilal, J. L. Mehta and Daya Krishna. Two broad topics will be considered: first, the contemporary re-evaluation of the classical Indian tradition; and secondly, the efforts at situating the Indian tradition within the global philosophical discourse. Sub-area(s): Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH3208 Buddhist Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

As Buddhist philosophical issues and logic were only established in the course of Mahayanic development, we will study Mahayanic issues such as icchantika and the Mahayanic theory of knowledge. Under the latter, topics such as the concept of Buddha nature, reality, sources of knowledge, sensations, reflexes, conceptions, judgement, inferences, etc. will be examined. Sub-area(s): Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH3216 Comparative Environmental Ethics


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module examines how various traditions, both East and West, perceive the relationship between humans and the natural world. It will compare how, e.g., Christianity, the secular West, Hinduism, Taoism and Confucianism conceive of this relation. Commonalities and differences in the respective approaches will be discussed and highlighted. Sub-area(s): Value Theory, Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH3218 Introduction to Comparative Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): (PH2205 or PH2301 or PH2302 or PH3205) and (PH2206 or PH2207 or PH3209); Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module, designed for students with some philosophical training in both western and non-western philosophy, brings together traditions of philosophy that have developed in relative isolation from one another for the purpose of comparing how different cultures have approached and thematised major issues such as knowledge, truth, values (ethical, religious, social, political and aesthetic) and the practices they inform, language and the place of the human. It aims to elucidate the assumptions implicit in different ways of thinking about these issues and investigate how issues may be related in the light of these assumptions. Sub-area(s): Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH3301 Classical Chinese Philosophy II


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-3-4; Prerequisite(s): PH2301; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This is the second part of a two part course which offers an introduction to philosophical debate in the Warring States period of ancient China, the Classical Age of Chinese Philosophy and the seedbed from which grew all of the native currents of thought that survived from traditional China. Continuing from Part I, we will be discussing Later Mohist Logic, Gongsun Long and other ‘Sophists’, Zhuangzi, Xunzi and Hanfeizi in this module. The approach of the course will be both historical and critical, and we will attempt to both situate Classical Chinese philosophical discourse in its intellectual-historical context and to bring out its continuing relevance. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy, Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH3302 Chinese Philosophical Traditions II


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-3-4; Prerequisite(s): PH2302; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This second half of a two-part course on Chinese Philosophical Traditions focuses on Early Modern Chinese Philosophy. This module focuses on the changes in the Confucian tradition between the late Tang through the Qing. We cover the main figures in Neo-Confucianism, and examine in detail the philosophies of Zhu Xi (1130-1200) and Wang Yangming (1472-1529). We close with a discussion of the philological turn in the Qing dynasty. We treat these thinkers and their ideas in their proper historical contexts and evaluate their philosophies critically. We also address and assess the relevance of these ideas to contemporary philosophical debates. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy, Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH3303 Modern Chinese Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-3-4; Prerequisite(s): At least one Chinese Philosophy module (PH2301 OR PH2302) or Lecturer’s permission; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module is intended for students usually in their third year, preferably with some basic knowledge of Chinese Philosophy. It will study the key Chinese Philosophical debates from the nineteenth century to the present. This is a period dominated by China’s encounter with the Modern West, giving rise to criticisms of its own philosophical traditions and attempts to modernize them. New philosophical movements, such as Chinese Marxism also grew from that intellectual ferment. Both Chinese and Western philosophers’ works will be considered. The core reading materials will be in English, but there may be a few optional readings in Chinese. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy, Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH3304 Daoist Traditions


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): PH2301 OR GEK2039; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

An exploration of the ancient mystical and philosophical aspects of Daoism as well as the living religious tradition, their relationships to each other, and their expression in Chinese culture and civilization. Topics include the Daodejing, Zhuangzi, the Daoist Canon (Dao zang), meditation, immortality, alchemy, and ritual. Students read the major Daoist philosophical classics in a broader historical context, and gain knowledge and understanding of the religious and other aspects of Daoism in relation to the philosophy. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy, Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH4204 Topics in Indian Philosophy


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH or 28 MCs in GL/GL recognized non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

An in-depth study of a major topic in Indian philosophy. We may study a particular philosopher such as Sankara or Nagarjuna. We may concentrate on a particular school of Indian Philosophy such as Advaita Vedanta or Madhyamika. We may also consider modern Indian thought within the context of contemporary cultural theory by considering figures such as Tagore or Gandhi. Sub-area(s): Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH4205 Topics in East Asian Philosophy


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH or 28 MCs in GL/GL recognized non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track. PH2301 or PH2302.; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

Specific areas of the rich philosophical traditions of China, Japan and Korea will be explored in this module. The precise topics vary from year to year, and may include specific aspects of Confucianism, Daoism, Legalism, Buddhism and Shinto. Attention may also be directed to certain fundamental themes in East Asian philosophy, such as human nature, education, politics and law. Sub-area(s): Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH4208 Topics in Buddhism


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH or 28 MCs in GL/GL recognized non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

A study of the work of a major figure in philosophy. The philosopher studied may be from the Asian or Western tradition, from any period up to the present day. The philosopher selected may be someone important who has not been given much coverage in other courses. This module deals with specific Buddhist thinkers and philosophical schools. Topics chosen vary from year to year, and could include the philosophy of Madhyamaka, Zen Buddhism, the Three Treatise School, Vasubandhu, Nagarjuna, and major figures in Chinese Buddhism. Sub-area(s): Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH4213 Comparative Philosophy


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH or 28 MCs in EU/ LA(French/German/Spanish)/recognised modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module identifies and compares the philosophical traditions generally labelled Eastern and Western. Aspects of comparative analysis include philosophical reasoning, linguistic style, logic of arguments, and substantive content. Comparison between traditions is cross-cultural and can result in dialogues across boundaries of space and time, and can also provide a forum to demonstrate the universality of human thought. Possible topics include, for example, Wittgenstein and Daoist philosophy, Nietzsche and Buddhism. Sub-area(s): Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH4311 Classical Chinese Through Philosophical Texts


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH or 28 MCs in GL/GL recognized non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Any one of the lower level Chinese Philosophy modules (PH2301 or PH2302) Preclusion(s): CL3204. This is taught in Mandarin, those who could do this module should not be taking the proposed module. Reverse preclusion module, if their Mandarin improved sufficiently, could still benefit from CL3204 and will not find that too easy. Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module introduces students to Classical Chinese through close reading and practice at translation of selected passages from philosophical texts, including a philosophically oriented grammatical introduction in English to the Classical Chinese language. It is intended for students who have little or only average second language reading ability in Mandarin. Topics include the fundamentals of Classical Chinese grammar and readings from philosophical texts written in Classical Chinese from different periods. This module will provide the language foundation required for students intending to do graduate work in Chinese Philosophy, and enable them to work with primary materials.

IVLE

PH4312 Contemporary Readings in East Asian Philosophy


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH or 28 MCs in GL/GL recognized non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track. PH2301 or PH2302 or PH2321 or PH3208 or PH3218 or PH3301 or PH3302 or PH3303 or PH3304 or CH2252 or CH3253.; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

A selection of contemporary discussions on East Asian Philosophy (e.g., Chinese, Japanese, Korean) will be discussed in the module. The aim is to introduce students to the more recent scholarly developments in the modern study of traditional East Asian Philosophy. The readings selected will focus on specific topics and will vary from year to year.

IVLE

PH5510 Comparative Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 0-3-0-3-4; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module will explore the aims and methods of comparative philosophy that crosses cultural boundaries through critical readings of samples of such philosophical endeavours. Each student will develop and defend a way of doing comparative philosophy and put it into practice by writing a research paper on a philosophical topic of their choice that compares thinkers or schools from different cultural traditions. Sub-area(s): Asian, Comparative

IVLE

PH6320 Traditions in Asian Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 0-3-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Offered to Graduate students only and admission of others by permission of instructor. ; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

The module will intensively examine philosophical traditions from the histories of Chinese or Indian Philosophy. Traditions may include (but is not restricted to) Confucianism, Taoism, neo-Confucianism, Legalism from Chinese Philosophy and Vedanta, Indian Buddhism, Nyaya, modern Indian philosophy from the Indian tradition. The emphasis will be on the building of a solid foundation in the philosophical grammar of a non-Western philosophical tradition. Sub-area(s): History of Philosophy, Asian, Comparative

IVLE




Logic and Philosophy of Science

GEK2048/GET1026 Effective Reasoning


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): PH2111; Cross-listing(s): GET1026

Description:

What is good reasoning? We will try to answer this question by studying the mechanics of reasoning. Students will learn what an argument is, what the difference between validity and soundness is, and what it means to say that an argument is valid in virtue of its form. They will also be introduced to various strategies and pitfalls in reasoning. In addition, to hone their analytical skills, students will be given arguments—drawn from philosophy and other areas—to unpack and evaluate. It is hoped that in the process of learning what counts as good reasoning, one will become a better reasoner.

Sub-area(s): Metaphysics, Epistemology, Mind, Language

IVLE

GEM2006/GET1028 Logic


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): PH2110, CS3234 and MA4207; Cross-listing(s): GET1028

Description:

An introduction to classical logic. The first half of the course introduces propositional logic, using the techniques of truth-tables and linear proof by contradiction. The second half of the course extends the use of linear proof by contradiction to predicate logic. Emphasis is placed on applying the techniques to philosophical arguments.

IVLE

PH2201/GEM2025 Introduction to Philosophy of Science


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEM2025; Cross-listing(s): GEM2025

Description:

An introduction to a spectrum of philosophical issues concerning modern science. These range from explaining the development of science, including a comparison with traditional approaches, to understanding nature in both the West and the East, to problems of the rationality of science. This will also involve a historical study of the development of philosophy of science in the Western tradition, from Bacon and Hume, through Mill, to Popper, Kuhn and Feyerabend. Sub-area(s): Logic, Science

IVLE

PH2223/GEK2037 Introduction to Philosophy of Technology


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEK2037; Cross-listing(s): GEK2037

Description:

This module looks at the philosophical problems arising from technology and its relation to nature and human values. In doing so, it draws on a number of philosophical approaches and traditions. Among the topics to be discussed are the relation between science and technology, the way technology has shaped our perception of nature and human experience, and the ethical challenges posed by technological progress. Potential topics to be discussed will include the concept of risk, issues in environmental ethics, and social-epistemological problems arising from communication technology. Sub-area(s): Logic, Science

IVLE

PH3201 Philosophy of Social Science


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

The founding of social science as a special discipline for the study of social phenomena in the late nineteenth century and its development through the twentieth century will be examined in this module. The critique of the physical science model, which was originally used to ground the theory of social science research, will be considered. This course guides students through the various philosophical debates, which shaped the development of modern social science. Attention will also be given to how social science research bears, directly or indirectly, on social practices. Sub-area(s): Logic, Science

IVLE

PH3246 Paradoxes


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): PH2110/GEM2006; Preclusion(s): ; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module is a survey of classic paradoxes, ancient and modern. No mere brain-teasers, these riddles have exercised some of history’s best minds, often with startling results. How is motion possible? What is a gamble at given odds worth? is time travel possible? Why do nations honor their treaty obligations? What are numbers? The contemplation of paradoxes drives the search for answers to these questions and more, and by grappling with the paradoxes, students gain familarity with key techniques and concepts of decision theory and logical analysis which are useful both in philosophy and other fields of inquiry.

IVLE

PH3247 Philosophical Logic


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): PH2110/GEM2006; Preclusion(s): PH2214; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

In classical logic, every sentence is either true or false, every argument with contradictory permises or a tautologous conclusion is valid, and every conditional with a false antecedent or true consequent is true. In this course, we explore non-classical logics which weaken these assumptions, including but not limited to various many-valued, modal and relevant logics, along with the philosophical questions they raise and answer.

IVLE

PH4201 Philosophy of Science


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module addresses important issues concerning the structure and development of scientific knowledge. These involve questions regarding the character of scientific method, the demarcation of scientific theories from other types of theories, whether the growth of science can be characterised as cumulative and progressive, the role of socio-cultural factors in shaping the content of scientific theories, the criteria deployed to determine which of a number of competing theories are scientifically acceptable, and the extent to which scientific theories can be said to give a realistic description of the world. Sub-area(s): Logic, Science

IVLE

PH4241 Issues in Philosophical Logic


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module will explore in depth some advanced topics in philosophical logic. Possible topics include extensions to classical logic, such as modal logics and higher order logics, non-classical logics, such as intuitionistic, many-valued and relevant logics, or philosophical questions about logic.

IVLE

PH5423 Philosophy of Science and Technology


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 3-0-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

The module is intended to provide a framework for discussing thematically related questions arising in contemporary philosophy of science and technology. The focus will be on an in-depth study of a specific debate within general philosophy of science (e.g., scientific realism), or on a close examination of a branch within the philosophy of special sciences (e.g., philosophy of biology, philosophy of physics). In exceptional cases, the module may be structured around a suitable recent monograph or collection of papers. Sub-area(s): Logic, Science

IVLE

PH6241 Advanced Philosophical Logic


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 0-3-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Offered to Graduate students only and admission of others by permission of instructor.; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module will explore in depth some advanced topics in philosophical logic. Possible topics include extensions to classical logic, such as modal logics and higher order logics, non-classical logics, such as intuitionistic, many-valued and relevant logics, or philosophical questions about logic.

IVLE




Variable / Others

GEK1067/GET1029 Life, the Universe, and Everything


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): PH1102E; Cross-listing(s): GET1029

Description:

GEK1067/GET1029 offers an opportunity to grapple with some of the most enduring challenges to human thought. Our starting point is a conception of ourselves as free and conscious beings equipped with bodies that allow us to observe and explore a familiar external world. Successive lectures investigate alternative conceptions of the human condition, such as ones in which we are unfree, or non-spirituous, or inhabit a world whose fundamental nature is hidden from our view. Different conceptions bear differently on the further question of what we should value and why. Discussion is both argument-driven and historically informed.

*GEK20167/GET2019 replaces PH1102E as the essential introductory module for the PH major and minor from AY2016-17.

IVLE

GEK2041/GET1025 Science Fiction and Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-2-1-4; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): PH2225; Cross-listing(s): GET1025

Description:

This module considers science fiction as a mode of philosophical inquiry. Science fiction stories are used to examine fundamental questions of metaphysics, epistemology and ethics. Topics include the nature of time, space, religion, nature, mind, and the future. Specific topics may include such issues as genetic enhancement, environmental ethics, and implications of encounters with non-human life forms.

Sub-area(s): Metaphysics, Epistemology, Mind, Language

IVLE

GEM1004/GET1027 Reason and Persuasion


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 3-1-0-2-4; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): GEM1004, PH1101E, [Students majoring in Philosophy can still take the module, as our exposure module is now numbered GET2018.]; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

For the first six weeks, students read three dialogues by the ancient Greek philosopher, Plato: Euthyphro, Meno, and Republic, Book I. These readings touch on a wide range of topics: mind and morals; politics and psychology; metaphysics and science. For the second six weeks, students will meet with the same problems, ideas and arguments, but as they manifest in the writings of various contemporary figures – philosophers and non-philosophers: psychologists, political scientists, public policy experts.

‘Reason and Persuasion’ is a generic title. But it indicates a specific concern. Reason without persuasion is useless; persuasion without reason is dangerous. Plato worried about this; so will we.

IVLE

PH2880 Topics in Philosophy


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 2-1-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Nil; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

‘Topics’ designates a category of module, not a specific module. The category exists to allow the occasional teaching of specialised subjects outside of the department’s set of standard offerings. Sub-area(s): Variable

IVLE

PH4206 A Major Philosopher


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH or 28 MCs in EU/ LA(French/German/Spanish)/recognised modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

A study of the work of a major figure in philosophy. The philosopher studied may be from the Asian or Western tradition, from any period up to the present day. The philosopher selected may be someone important who has not been given much coverage in other courses. Sub-area(s): Variable

IVLE

PH4210 Topics in Western Philosophy


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH or 28 MCs in EU/ LA(French/German/Spanish)/recognised modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module deals with specific topics of current interest and controversy in Western philosophy. The topics to be discussed may be in, but are not limited to, philosophy of science, philosophy of language, philosophy of psychology, epistemology, metaphysics, ethics, or social and political philosophy. Sub-area(s): Variable

IVLE

PH4261 Immanuel Kant


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-0-9.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH or 28 MCs in EU/ LA(French/German/Spanish)/recognised modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

Immanuel Kant is one of the most important philosophers and his major works are influential in many areas of contemporary philosophy. This module allows students to study the philosophy of Kant with some depth. Each offering of this module will select a key body of works from Kant’s philosophical corpus, such as (i) his Critique of Pure Reason or (ii) his main texts in Moral Philosophy or (iii) his philosophy of the natural and/or human sciences. It may also include the study of major contemporary scholarship on Kant. Sub-area(s): Variable

IVLE

PH4262 Nietzsche


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-3-0-3-6.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH or 28MCs in EU/LA (French/German/Spanish)/recognised modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track.; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

This module will focus on the philosophy of the 19th Century German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. It will proceed chronologically through Nietzsche’s most significant writings, such as The Gay Science; Thus Spoke Zarathustra; Beyond Good and Evil; On the Genealogy of Morality. Most of the attention will be on primary sources. All materials will be in English. Sub-area(s): Variable

IVLE

PH4401 Honours Thesis


Modular Credits: 15; Workload: 0-1-0-0-36.5; Prerequisite(s): Cohort 2015 and before: Completed 110MCs including 60MCs of PH major requirements with a minimum CAP of 3.5. Cohort 2016 onwards: Completed 110MCs including 44MCs of PH major requirements with a minimum CAP of 3.5.; Preclusion(s): PH4660; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

A dissertation on an approved research topic not exceeding twelve thousand words. Please register PH4401 manually with the Department. Please refer to http://www.fas.nus.edu.sg/philo/academic_requirements.html for more information on the PH major requirement. Sub-area(s): NA

IVLE

PH4550 Internship: Philosophy for Teaching


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 3-3-2-1-3.5; Prerequisite(s): Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in PH, with a minimum CAP of 3.2 or be on the Honours track. (students will apply to Department to read this module and qualified applicants will be selected through an interview).; Preclusion(s): Any other internship module.; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

Students will intern in an educational organisation approved by the Department. (e.g. Logic Mills, which specialises in courses on analytical thinking skills to schools and other educational organisations). During the internship, they will learn to use their philosophical skills to teach, and through practice, reflect on the usefulness of Philosophy in education practice and intellectual development. Sub-area(s): NA

IVLE

PH4660 Independent Study


Modular Credits: 5; Workload: 0-0-0-0-12.5; Prerequisite(s): Cohort 2015 and before: To be offered subject to the agreement of the Supervisor and Department. Completed 100 MCs, including 60 MCs in PH, with a minimum CAP of 3.2. Cohort 2016 onwards: To be offered subject to the agreement of the Supervisor and Department. Completed 100 MCs, including 44 MCs inPH, with a minimum CAP of 3.2.; Preclusion(s): PH4401; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

The Independent Study Module is designed to enable the student to explore an approved topic within the discipline in depth. The student should approach a lecturer to work out an agreed topic, readings, and assignments for the module. A formal, written agreement is to be drawn up, giving a clear account of the topic, programme of study, assignments, evaluation, and other pertinent details. Head’s and/or Honours Coordinator’s approval of the written agreement is required. Regular meetings and reports are expected. Evaluation is based on 100% Continuous Assessment and must be worked out between the student and the lecturer prior to seeking departmental approval. Please register PH4660 manually with the Department. Sub-area(s): NA

IVLE

PH6760 Philosophical Topics


Modular Credits: 4; Workload: 0-3-0-0-7; Prerequisite(s): Offered to Graduate students only and admission of others by permission of instructor; Preclusion(s): Nil; Cross-listing(s): Nil

Description:

The module will study a topic in various areas of philosophy, ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, aesthetics, political philosophy, a topic that crosses area boundaries. An example might be “Theories of Human Nature”. The module might approach the topic from within the perspective of one philosophical school or from a comparative perspective that examines the views of more than one philosophical school, eastern or western. Sub-area(s): Variable

IVLE