Bachelor of Arts/ Social Sciences (Hons)

The Psychology major and minor programmes are open to all matriculated students of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences who have obtained a minimum grade of ‘C6’ in GCE 'O' level Mathematics or equivalent. IB applicants are eligible if they have taken at least SL Mathematical Studies.

Psychology is the study of brain and behaviour, and covers a diverse range of topics from biological, cognitive, developmental, social and personality, and abnormal psychology, to specialised topics such as emotion and health psychology.

Careers for students who graduate with an Honours degree in Psychology include employment at institutions such as the Ministry of Defence, the Ministry of Education, the Singapore Prison Service, and the Singapore Police Force.

Individuals who would like to pursue a career as a Clinical Psychologist would need a postgraduate degree in clinical psychology. The Master of Psychology (Clinical) Programme at NUS is an example of a postgraduate degree in Clinical Psychology. Individuals who would like to pursue a career as an Educational (School) or Forensic Psychologist would also need a postgraduate degree in Educational Psychology or Forensic Psychology respectively. Details about these specialisations can be found at the website of the Singapore Psychological Society.

Prospective students who would like to major in Psychology at NUS have to meet the pre-requisites for Psychology and obtain a grade of B- or better for the PL1101E module and a grade of B- or better for the PL2131 module. Students who achieved the minimum B- grades for PL1101E and PL2131 but have chosen to exercise the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) option for these two modules will still eligible to declare Psychology as their major.

Prospective students who would like to major in Psychology at NUS are recommended to take the Introduction to Psychology module known as PL1101E in the first semester of their academic year. In PL1101E, students are introduced to the core topics in Psychology which comprise Biological, Cognitive, Developmental, Social, and Abnormal Psychology. Students who would like to major in Psychology are also recommended to take the Research and Statistical Methods I module known as PL2131 in the first or second semester of their first academic year.

A brief synopsis of the "Introduction to Psychology" module (PL1101E) and the "Research and Statistical Methods I" module (PL2131) are on our website. Students who have matriculated at NUS can obtain more information about PL1101E through the NUS Integrated Virtual Learning Environment: IVLE.

Psychology with a 2nd major in Life Science. Double majors allow students to broaden their knowledge and capacities by pursuing a second major alongside their primary major. FASS, along with the Faculty of Science (FOS), offers direct admission to a structured Psychology/Life Science double-major program, for suitably qualified FASS students. Admission requirements include a good H2 pass or equivalent in Biology, Chemistry, and either Mathematics or Physics. For more information, please go to http://www.fas.nus.edu.sg/prospective/undergrad/double_major.html.

Information about the undergraduate Psychology programme at NUS may also be obtained from the student society for Psychology students at NUS: the NUS Psychology Society.

For further information relating to admission issues, please visit the website of the Office of Admissions.

Areas of Specialization

The Psychology Department offers graduate degrees based on course work and research.

The course work programmes provide an entry level professional training in clinical psychology and completion of the programme requirements will be recognized with a Master of Psychology (Clinical) degree. Programme details can be found in here.

The research programmes require the completion of general and area modules as well as a research project. The completion of programme requirements will be recognized with a Master of Social Sciences (M.Soc.Sci) or a doctorate (Ph.D.) degree.

The graduate program of the Department of Psychology is divided into six research areas. They are Clinical Science and Health Psychology, Cognition, Developmental Psychology, Quantitative Psychology, Social and Cognitive Neuroscience, and Social, Personality, and Industrial-Organizational Psychology. These six research areas reflect the diversity of research topics that our faculty have considerable expertise on. Prospective students are welcome to explore the specific research interests of individual faculty members within the areas.

Other than these six research areas, the department has several faculty members who work on two research themes focusing on (a) Emotion, and (b) Language and Communication. Prospective students interested in these two themes stand to benefit from a graduate training that approach these topics from a multidisciplinary perspective.

Clinical Science and Health Psychology

The Clinical Science and Health Psychology area have research interests in psychological and physical well-being. Faculty members investigate various aspects surrounding psychological disorders and symptoms, including etiology, assessment, and intervention strategies. Notable expertise in this area include emotion dysregulation, neuropsychology, autistic spectrum disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and therapy approaches like cognitive-behavioral therapy and mindfulness. Faculty members specializing in health psychology examines adjustment and treatment adherence to physical illness, with a particular focus on renal diseases.

For more information regarding the research of individual faculty members in the Clinical Science and Health Psychology area, please visit their personal webpages.

Core Faculty

Simon Collinson, Konstadina Griva, Clare Henn-Haase, Shian-Ling Keng, Iliana Magiati, Michael Power, Catherine Tang

Affiliated Faculty

Stuart Derbyshire, Ryan Hong

Cognition

Cognitive psychology studies how people perceive, remember, learn, and process information. Areas of inquiry include perception, attention, memory, interval timing, and language processing. The Cognition group at NUS Psychology has notable strengths in the following specific topics: lexical processing, the organization of lexical knowledge in memory, visual attention and visual-spatial perception, and auditory-related cognition. The Cognition group emphasizes research informed by theory and uses both behavioral approaches and techniques such as event-related potentials (ERPs), and neuroimaging.

For more information regarding the research of individual faculty members in the Cognition area, please visit their personal webpages.

Core Faculty

Winston D. Goh, Maria Kozhevnikov, Stephen W. H. Lim, Melvin J. Yap

Affiliated Faculty

Clare Henn-Haase, O’Dhaniel Mullette-Gillman, Michael Power, Leher Singh

Developmental Psychology

Faculty members in the Developmental Psychology area are broadly interested in growth processes in cognitive and socio-emotional functioning of infants, children, and adolescents. The group has specific expertise in infant language development, children’s socio-emotional development in cross-cultural contexts, and attachment relationships in adolescents. Faculty members use a range of experimental and survey methods to address important issues in human development.

For more information regarding the research of individual faculty members in the Developmental Psychology area, please visit their personal webpages.

Core Faculty

John M. Elliott, Nina Powell, Lili Qin, Tick Ngee Sim, Leher Singh

Affiliated Faculty

Iliana Magiati

Quantitative Psychology

The Quantitative Psychology area focuses on advancing methodological and statistical techniques used in psychological research. The area has notable expertise in advanced statistical procedures like structural equation modelling, meta-analysis, and the integration between these two approaches (i.e., meta-analytic structural equation modelling). Graduate students in this area would gain a comprehensive understanding of various statistical techniques and be in a good position to handle and evaluate empirical data.

For more information regarding the research of individual faculty members in the Quantitative Psychology area, please visit their personal webpages.

Core Faculty

Mike W.-L. Cheung

Social and Cognitive Neuroscience

The Social and Cognitive Neuroscience area is a diverse and multidisciplinary group engaging in a wide spectrum of research topics. These topics include examining the neurological bases of (a) cognitive functions like memory, attention, and decision making, (b) perceptions of emotion, and (c) the experience of pain. Related research foci consist of molecular genetics of human behavior, neuroeconomics, and non-human primate neurophysiology. Faculty members in this group are united by an interest in understanding the biological and neurological underpinnings of cognitive function and behavior, and their use of neuroimaging techniques such as EEG and fMRI.

For more information regarding the research of individual faculty members in the Social and Cognitive Neuroscience area, please visit their personal webpages.

Core Faculty

Stuart Derbyshire, Richard Ebstein, Nicholas Hon, Camilo Libedinsky, O’Dhaniel Mullette-Gillman, Trevor Penney, Rongjun Yu

Affiliated Faculty

Maria Kozhenikov

Social, Personality, and Industrial-Organizational Psychology

The Social, Personality, and Industrial-Organizational Psychology group is broadly interested in understanding human behavior from multiple perspectives – from within-person factors (e.g., personality, emotion, and motivation) to those external of individuals (e.g., interpersonal and organizational contextual influences). Faculty members in this group have interests in a wide range of topics such as attitudes and persuasion, positive emotions, motivation and goal pursuit, moral judgements and emotions, interpersonal relationships, personality and psychopathology, negotiation and conflict management, and dynamics of trust in organizational contexts. In their research, members use a variety of designs and statistical techniques like multilevel analysis, structural equation modelling, and meta-analysis.

For more information regarding the research of individual faculty members in the Social, Personality, and Industrial-Organizational Psychology area, please visit their personal webpages.

Core Faculty

Al K. C. Au, Yeow Siah Cha, Ashley Fulmer, Ryan Y. Hong, Lile Jia, Y. H. Michelle See, Eddie M. W. Tong, Fen-Fang Tsai

Affiliated Faculty

Shian-Ling Keng, Nina Powell

Research Theme: Emotion

Faculty members study various aspects of emotion and affect. They include the neurophysiological basis of emotions in humans and non-human animals, the appraisal process in emotional experience, the relation between cognition and emotion, and emotion dysregulation.

For more information regarding the research of individual faculty members in the Emotion research theme, please visit their personal webpages.

Core Faculty

Eddie M. W. Tong, Stuart Derbyshire, Shian-Ling Keng, Clare Henn-Haase, Michael Power, Ashley Fulmer

Research Theme: Language and Communication

Faculty members in this theme are united in their interests surrounding language and communication. Topics of enquiry include infant language acquisition, lexical and reading processes, lexical representation in memory, and communicative functions of emotion.

For more information regarding the research of individual faculty members in the Language and Communication research theme, please visit their personal webpages.

Core Faculty

Winston D. Goh, Konstadina Griva, Melvin J. Yap

Master of Social Science (Psychology)

Candidates seeking admission to the programme leading to the Master of Social Sciences (Psychology) degree by research must have obtained either:

A good Honours degree or equivalent in psychology or a related subject;
OR such other qualifications and experience as the Faculty and Board of Graduate Studies may approve.

It is a faculty requirement that you submit a preliminary research proposal. If you apply to the Psychology Research Graduate Programme, this proposal should be submitted in the form of a personal statement. Instructions on what should go into your personal statement can be found here.

Applicants should examine faculty profiles on the department webpage prior to submitting their application, in order to find out whether their research interests can be accommodated by one (or more) of our staff members. Applicants should then specify their preferred supervisors (in descending order of preference) in their personal statement. Your listed supervisors will evaluate your applications when they reach the department and decide at that point whether they are prepared to supervise you (or not). However, since admission is contingent on securing a willing supervisor, please ensure that your research interests (as reflected in your personal statement) overlap well with your proposed supervisor's, to maximize your chance of securing a supervisor. In view of this, you do NOT have to secure a supervisor prior to submitting your application.

The Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences awards research scholarships for graduate students on a competitive basis. More information on this scholarship and other financial aids is available here. Financial aid from research grants awarded to individual staff members may also be available.


GRE Requirements for Graduate Admissions to NUS Psychology

All applicants (except graduates from the National University of Singapore, Nanyang Technological University and Singapore Management University) must submit the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test Score. Scores must be from an examination taken within the last five years.

Submission of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Subject Test (Psychology) Score is not required, even for applicants whose undergraduate major is not in psychology. However, applicants can submit the GRE Subject Test Score for the department’s consideration if they wish to. Scores must be from an examination taken within the last five years.

Submitting Test Scores: Scores must be reported directly to NUS from the Educational Testing Service. The institution code for the National University of Singapore is 0677.


English Proficiency Requirement for Graduate Admissions to NUS Psychology

International applicants who completed an undergraduate degree from an institution where the language of instruction is NOT English will need to provide TOEFL or IELTS scores. Applicants must have an acceptable score in English proficiency [TOEFL score of at least 580 for the paper-based test, 85 for the internet-based test (with a minimum score of 22 for the writing section) or 237 for the computer-based test; and 6 for IELTS or equivalent].


Programme Requirements

For more information on admissions, please visit: https://www.fas.nus.edu.sg/research/appndeadline.html

Concurrent Degree Programme [B.Soc.Sci. (Hons.) and M.Soc.Sci.]

1. Introduction

In Singapore, the Master’s degree is increasingly becoming the desired entry level requirement for junior and senior psychologist positions in the Civil Service and the private sector. Our department’s Concurrent Degree Programme [B.Soc.Sci. (Hons.) and M.Soc.Sci. in Psychology] provides psychology majors with the option of making a seamless transition to the Master’s programme, and to secure 2 degrees in 5 years (instead of the usual 6 years if the 2 degrees are taken separately), thereby making them more competitive for industry and graduate school. Graduates from this programme will possess strong quantitative and qualitative research skills, as well as domain expertise in their chosen area of research. To the extent possible, candidates will also be encouraged to attend and present their work at international conferences.

2. Programme Structure

Candidates must successfully complete 176 MCs of coursework, which comprise the following:

  • 20 MCs University-Level Requirements (Breadth, General Education, Singapore Studies)
  • 28 MCs (Unrestricted Electives)
  • 97 MCs (Exposure and Major Modules)
  • 16 MCs (Graduate Modules)
  • 15 MCs (Integrated Thesis)

In addition to the present graduation requirements for Single Major Honours, the candidate must also pass an additional research module (PL3231/PL328x), PL3239 (Industrial and Organizational Psychology), and PL4201 (Psychometrics and Psychological Testing).

At the graduate level, candidates will take PL6770 (Graduate Research Seminar), PL5221 (Analysis of Psychological Data using GLM), PL5222 (Multivariate Statistics in Psychology), and a core module corresponding to their area of interest (PL5303, PL5304, PL5305, PL5306, PL5307, OR PL5308).

A key component of this research-intensive programme is the Integrated Thesis, which reflects the candidate’s ability to independently conduct quality research that makes meaningful connections to the extant literature.

3. Admission Requirements

Admission to the Concurrent Degree Programme is both competitive and selective. Shortlisted candidates will undergo a rigorous admissions selection process, which includes the following requirements:

  • Majoring in Psychology,
  • Passed the following essential modules (PL1101E, PL2131, PL2132, PL3232, PL3233, PL3234, PL3235, PL3236, and PL3231 OR PL328x),
  • Cumulative Average Point (CAP) ≥ 4.0 & Psychology Subject Average Point (SJAP) ≥ 4.3 (at the time of application),
  • Average grade of A- for PL2131, PL2132, and either PL3231 or PL328x (no lower than B+ for any of these modules),
  • TWO (or more) recommendation/referee letters,
  • Personal Statement and a rank-ordered list of potential thesis supervisors.

Candidates will also be required to attend an interview session.

It is a Faculty requirement that you submit a preliminary research proposal. If you apply to the Psychology Research Graduate Programme, this proposal should be submitted in the form of a personal statement. Instructions on what should go into your personal statement can be found here.

Applicants should examine faculty profiles on the department webpage prior to submitting their application, in order to find out whether their research interests can be accommodated by one (or more) of our staff members. Applicants should then specify their preferred supervisors (in descending order of preference) in their personal statement. Your listed supervisors will evaluate your applications when they reach the department and decide at that point whether they are prepared to supervise you (or not). However, since admission is contingent on securing a willing supervisor, please ensure that your research interests (as reflected in your personal statement) overlap well with your proposed supervisor's, to maximize your chance of securing a supervisor. In view of this, you do NOT have to secure a supervisor prior to submitting your application.

4. Application Instructions and Deadline

Prospective students who plan to be admitted to the programme in August 2017 should submit their applications by 1st November 2016. Please send the application form along with the supporting documents (see below) or submit them personally to the Department of Psychology.

a. Research Application Form
b. Sealed Academic Referee's Report (at least two)
c. Unofficial NUS Transcript
d. Personal Statement (guide)

Department of Psychology
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
National University of Singapore

Block AS4, #02-07
9 Arts Link
Singapore 117570

If you have any questions, please write to psybox2@nus.edu.sg.

Master of Psychology (Clinical)

The Psychology Department offers two graduate (coursework based) degree programmes which provide an entry level professional training in clinical psychology: the NUS Programme and the Joint Programme with the University of Melbourne and NUS.

Completion of the programme requirements for each programme will be recognized with a Master of Psychology (Clinical) degree. Answers to frequently asked questions about Clinical Psychology and our degree programmes are available here.

Ph.D. (Psychology)

Candidates seeking admission to the programme leading to the Ph.D. (Psychology) degree by research must have obtained either:

A good Master's degree or equivalent in psychology or a related subject;
OR a good Honours degree (at least Distinction/Second Class Upper Division) or equivalent (e.g., a four-year Bachelors degree with an average grade above B) in a relevant discipline, subject to approval by the Faculty, on a case-by-case basis;
OR such other qualifications and experience as the Faculty and Board of Graduate Studies may approve.

It is a faculty requirement that you submit a preliminary research proposal. If you apply to the Psychology Research Graduate Programme, this proposal should be submitted in the form of a personal statement. Instructions on what should go into your personal statement can be found here.

Applicants should examine faculty profiles on the department webpage prior to submitting their application, in order to find out whether their research interests can be accommodated by one (or more) of our staff members. Applicants should then specify their preferred supervisors (in descending order of preference) in their personal statement. Your listed supervisors will evaluate your applications when they reach the department and decide at that point whether they are prepared to supervise you (or not). However, since admission is contingent on securing a willing supervisor, please ensure that your research interests (as reflected in your personal statement) overlap well with your proposed supervisor's, to maximize your chance of securing a supervisor. In view of this, you do NOT have to secure a supervisor prior to submitting your application.

The Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences awards research scholarships for graduate students on a competitive basis. More information on this scholarship and other financial aids is available here. Financial aid from research grants awarded to individual staff members may also be available.


GRE Requirements for Graduate Admissions to NUS Psychology

All applicants (except graduates from the National University of Singapore, Nanyang Technological University and Singapore Management University) must submit the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test Score. Scores must be from an examination taken within the last five years.

Submission of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Subject Test (Psychology) Score is not required, even for applicants whose undergraduate major is not in psychology. However, applicants can submit the GRE Subject Test Score for the department’s consideration if they wish to. Scores must be from an examination taken within the last five years.

Submitting Test Scores: Scores must be reported directly to NUS from the Educational Testing Service. The institution code for the National University of Singapore is 0677.


English Proficiency Requirement for Graduate Admissions to NUS Psychology

International applicants who completed an undergraduate degree from an institution where the language of instruction is NOT English will need to provide TOEFL or IELTS scores. Applicants must have an acceptable score in English proficiency [TOEFL score of at least 580 for the paper-based test, 85 for the internet-based test (with a minimum score of 22 for the writing section) or 237 for the computer-based test; and 6 for IELTS or equivalent].


Programme Requirements

For more information on admissions, please visit: https://www.fas.nus.edu.sg/research/appndeadline.html


Other Information

Some of our faculty supervise graduate students enrolled in the NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering. For more information, please visit: http://www.nus.edu.sg/ngs/


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