Module Information

Level 4000

Level 4000 Modules

SE4101 Southeast Asia Studies: Theory and Practice

Modular Credits: 5
Workload: 0-3-0-2-7.5
Pre-requisites:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE, with a minimum CAP of 3.50 or be on Honours track.
Cohort 2012 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE, or 28 MCs in GL/GL recognised non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.
Preclusions: ALL Non SE major students

The module prepares Honours students for their thesis exercise, particularly in the choice of analytical framework and appropriate research design. Students are introduced to various ideas about 'theory' and 'practice' in research on Southeast Asia. Different disciplinary approaches are compared and evaluated in terms of the way they formulate research questions, conceptualise research design and measure evidence. Attention will also be paid to modes of writing and representation adopted in texts under study. Seminar discussions are aimed at helping students think critically about the suitability of various approaches to their own research interests.


SE4201 Southeast Asian Languages as Research Tools

Modular Credits: 5
Workload: 0-3-0-4.5-5
Pre-requisites:
Cohort 2011 and before:
(1) Level 6 module in a Southeast Asian language (or an equivalent level of skills in any Southeast Asian language, including those not taught at NUS).
(2) Permission of lecturer.
(3) Completed 80MCs, including 28 MCs in SE, with a minimum CAP of 3.50 or be on Honours track.
Cohort 2012 onwards:
(1) Level 6 module in a Southeast Asian language (or an equivalent level of skills in any Southeast Asian language, including those not taught at NUS).
(2) Permission of lecturer.
(3) Completed 80MCs, including 28 MCs in SE, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.

This module enables students to use language as a research tool. They will learn about the importance of Southeast Asian languages as primary sources for research, explore issues in translation and reflect on research methodologies involved in using foreign languages. Students may use different languages they know to explore issues studies in this module.


SE4210 Ancient Kingdoms of Southeast Asia

Modular Credits: 5
Workload: 0-3-0-2-7.5
Pre-requisites:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE, with a minimum CAP of 3.50 or be on Honours track.
Cohort 2012 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE or 28 MCs in GL/GL recognised non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.

Historical sources (writing) and archaeology (material culture) give very different perspectives on the development of civilisations. This module follows the development of classical civilisations in Southeast Asia from the first to the sixteenth centuries A.D. Data from archaeological excavations are utilised to create a picture of the achievements of early historic people of the region in such areas as the formation of kingdoms and cities; trade; architecture; and warfare. Relations with China and India are also analysed.


SE4212 Elites of Southeast Asia

Modular Credits: 5
Workload: 0-3-0-2-7.5
Pre-requisites:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE or 28 MCs in SN, with a minimum CAP of 3.50 or be on Honours track.
Cohort 2012 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE, or 28 MCs in SN or 28 MCs in GL/GL recognised non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.

Aristocrats, bureaucrats and tycoons are just some of the different players that have occupied elite positions in Southeast Asian societies. This module looks at these and other elite groups in terms of the roles they have played and how they have acquired, maintained or lost elite status. Why, for example, is the military an elite group in some countries but not others? Do wealthy people inevitably hold political power? The module also investigates the effects of various types of elite rule on politics, economic growth and social justice.


SE4216 Southeast Asia in Archaeological Perspective

Modular Credits: 5
Workload: 0-3-0-2-7.5
Pre-requisites:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE, with a minimum CAP of 3.50 or be on Honours track.
Cohort 2012 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE or 28 MCs in GL/GL recognised non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.

Modern Southeast Asian cultures are the outcome of a process of cultural evolution during which man has adapted to a tropical environment. The module examines aspects of the region’s environment to which its cultures have adapted, introduces students to early human fossils, and discusses the discovery of agriculture, the bronze age, and the beginning of village life. A survey of historical archaeology then follows: the proto historical period and the indigenous base of early civilisation; the classical period of the Indianised kingdoms, with emphasis of art, architecture, trade and urbanisation; and the post-classic period, including the fall of Angkor, the rise of the Thai, the coming of Islam, and the effects of the coming of the Europeans, depicted at the sites of trading ports, palaces and forts.


SE4217 Southeast Asia in the Global Economy

Modular Credits: 5
Workload: 0-3-0-2-7.5
Pre-requisites:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE, with a minimum CAP of 3.50 or be on Honours track.
Cohort 2012 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE or 28 MCs in SC or 28 MCs in GL/GL recognised non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.

Southeast Asia has been linked to the rest of the world through various channels: historically through colonisation, geographically by land, water and air, economically through trade, financial capital, technology and foreign aid, politically through regional and international organisations, and culturally through human mobility. This module examines these linkages and the various factors that have influenced them particularly in terms of the national, regional and international policies.


SE4218 Majorities and Minorities in Southeast Asia

Modular Credits: 5
Workload: 0-3-0-2-7.5
Pre-requisites:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE or 28 MCs in MS or 28 MCs in SN, with a minimum CAP of 3.50 or be on Honours track.
Cohort 2012 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE or 28 MCs in MS or 28 MCs in SN or 28 MCs in GL/GL recognised non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.

This course focuses on the relations between majorities and minorities in Southeast Asia. Its aims are to understand how the relationships between the state and its peoples of different ethnicity and between the majority and the minority have brought about historical development and change, politically and economically, in the region. Discussions include the historical background of these peoples, their legends and myths of origins, cultures, relationships among ethnic groups and their perceptions of themselves and others, economic life and trade, migration, colonialism, the rise of the nation-state and its impacts on multi-ethnic societies.


SE4220 Special Studies on Southeast Asia

Modular Credits: 5
Workload: 0-3-0-2-7.5
Pre-requisites:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE, with a minimum CAP of 3.50 or be on Honours track.
Cohort 2012 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.

This module is intended to enable students to pursue in-depth readings on a topic which is relevant to the mission of the Department of Southeast Asian Studies but is not covered in the normal curriculum. It enables students to delve into a particular highly-specialized topic and engage critically in the relevant theoretical concepts that inform it. The students are responsible for defining their own research topic and composing a detailed bibliography in relation to the selected topic. Assessment for this module is primarily through seminar participation and/or project work.


SE4221 Southeast Asian Postcolonialism

Modular Credits: 5
Workload: 0-3-0-2-7.5
Pre-requisites:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE or 28 MCs in MS or 28 MCs in SN, with a minimum CAP of 3.50 or be on Honours track.
Cohort 2012 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE or 28 MCs in MS or 28 MCs in SN or 28 MCs in GL/GL recognised non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.

This module draws on insights from postcolonial criticism – a genre of writing that examines colonial practices, particularly, it exclusionary discourses and ambivalent interpretations – to rethink social categories and identities that constitute the political imaginings of postcolonial Southeast Asia. It explores how colonialist categories and knowledges on race, ethnicity, class, gender, culture/tradition and space return, in active forms, in the present, and how such “survivals” can be studied both historically and theoretically to reveal the connections between the political imaginings of the colonial and the postcolonial. It aims to: firstly, shed light on the politico-theoretical difficulties in the production of counter knowledges and counter histories in contemporary Southeast Asia; and secondly, unsettle conversations on the East-West divide by demonstrating the centrality of colonialism/postcolonialism in the making of the modern condition not only in the postcolonies but also in the metropole.


SE4223 Knowledge, Power and Colonialism in Southeast Asia

Modular Credits: 5
Workload: 0-3-0-2-7.5
Pre-requisites:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE or 28 MCs in MS, with a minimum CAP of 3.50 or be on Honours track.
Cohort 2012 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE or 28 MCs in MS or 28 MCs in GL/GL recognised non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.

Students of history usually mine Western accounts of Southeast Asia for the facts that they may contain, assuming that such texts are simply a means of accessing a vaguely apprehended reality “out there.” This module examines the ways in which writers located themselves vis a vis the region; the kinds of images, themes and motifs they used to describe it; the ideas and doctrines that informed them; the institutions and other works they affiliated their writings with; and the power over the societies of the region that arose from their enterprise. Modern scholarship has largely inherited Orientalist ways of looking at Southeast Asia. What are the alternatives?


SE4225 The Cold War in Southeast Asia

Modular Credits: 5
Workload: 0-3-0-2-7.5
Pre-requisites:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE, with a minimum CAP of 3.50 or be on Honours track.
Cohort 2012 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE or 28 MCs in GL/GL recognised non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.

As Southeast Asian states achieved independence, new pressures reached the region. Between the late 1940s and the early 1980s, Southeast Asia represented an arena of competition between the communist and capitalist worlds. This competition took many forms: diplomatic, political, military, economic, ideological and cultural. Some Southeast Asians took sides, for reasons ranging from the idealistic to the mercenary. Some Southeast Asian states became battle-grounds. For all the region’s societies, the political and diplomatic history, journalism and student life, social and intellectual change, and fiction and film of the Cold War era reflected a process of reconciling international and local forces.


SE4226 Doing Ethnography in Southeast Asia

Modular Credits: 5
Workload: 0-3-0-2-7.5
Pre-requisites:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE, with a minimum CAP of 3.50 or be on Honours track.
Cohort 2012 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE or 28 MCs in SC, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.

This module provides students with both methodological and theoretical guidance for doing critical ethnography in Southeast Asia. Students will systematically learn about the fundamentals of practising ethnography in Southeast Asia and consider philosophical-theoretical, disciplinary and ethical issues underpinning each stage of the ethnographic process. Different forms of ethnographic texts on Southeast Asia (including films) will be introduced and students will learn how to critically evaluate ethnographies. Students will have the opportunity to directly apply what they learn to their own research projects.


SE4227 Nationalism in Southeast Asia

Modular Credits: 5
Workload: 0-3-0-2-7.5
Pre-requisites:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE or 28 MCs in PS, with a minimum CAP of 3.50 or be on Honours track.
Cohort 2012 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE or 28 MCs in PS or 28 MCs in GL/GL recognised non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.

The module provides a critical study of various theories and practices of nationalism in Southeast Asi from an interdisciplinary perspective. What is the relationship between colonialism and the development of national attachments and nationalist politics? What roles have ethnicity and religion played in the emergence of national and state identities in Southeast Asia? Students will address these questions and examine the rise of nationalism as a leading political principle and the fate of the nation-state in an increasingly globalised and globalising world.


SE4228 Contentious Politics in Southeast Asia

Modular Credits: 5
Workload: 0-3-0-2-7.5
Pre-requisites:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE, with a minimum CAP of 3.50 or be on Honours track.
Cohort 2012 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE or 28 MCs in GL/GL recognised non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.

This module introduces students to the study of protest and contentious politics in Southeast Asia. The module will cover different theoretical approaches (behavioralism, Marxism, resource mobilisation, political process, new social movements) as well as key analytical concepts (political opportunity structure, framing, social movement organisations, and transnational contention). Case studies, drawn from the late colonial and post-colonial periods, will examine individual social groups/sectors and major cycles of protest in the region (the Philippines in 1986 and 2001, Burma in 1988 and 2007, Indonesia and Malaysia in 1998, and Thailand in 1973, 1992, and 2006-8).


SE4229 Research in Southeast Asia Religions

Modular Credits: 5
Workload: 0-3-0-2-7.5
Pre-requisites:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE, with a minimum CAP of 3.50 or be on Honours track.
Cohort 2012 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in SE or 28 MCs in GL/GL recognised non-language modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.20 or be on the Honours track.

Southeast Asia is located at an historical crossroads of world religious traditions. From its pre-modern and modern colonial pasts to postcolonial and 'globalisation' periods, various religions have contined to shape the region's cultural, economic, and political outlooks. This module will explore one of the major world religion traditions in Southeast Asia (Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, OR Islam) as a way of understanding the past and present of one or more Southeast Asian societies. It covers how and why this religious tradition has persisted and continued to interact with social, political, and economic transformations in Southeast Asia. The particular religious tradition and society in focus will change according to the expertise of the lecturer teaching the module.


SE4401 Honours Thesis

Modular Credits: 15
Workload: 0-0-0-37.5-0
Pre-requisites:
Cohort 2015 and before: Completed 110 MCs including 60 MCs of SE major requirements with a minimum CAP of 3.50.
Cohort 2016 onwards: Completed 110 MCs including 44 MCs of SE major requirements with a minimum CAP of 3.50.
Preclusion(s): SE4660

Students are required to conduct research on a Southeast Asian topic under the supervision of a member of staff. Topics will be chosen by students in consultation with staff. The length of the honours thesis should not exceed 12,000 words. The honours thesis is equivalent to three modules.


SE4660 Independent Study

Modular Credits: 5
Workload: 0-0-0-12.5-0
Pre-requisites:
Cohort 2011 and before: Completed 100 MCs, including 60 MCs in SE, with a minimum CAP of 3.50.
Cohort 2012-2015: Completed 100 MCs, including 60 MCs in SE, with a minimum CAP of 3.20.
Cohort 2016 onwards: Completed 100 MCs, including 44 MCs in SE, with a minimum CAP of 3.20.
Preclusions: SE4401

The Independent Study Module is designed to enable the student to explore an approved topic in depth. The student should approach a lecturer to work out an agreed topic, readings and assignments for the module. A formal, written agreement is to be drawn up, giving a clear account of the topic, programme of study, assignments, evaluation and other pertinent details. Head's and/or Honours Coordinator's approval of the written agreement is required. Regular meetings and reports are expected. Evaluation is based on 100% Continuous Assessment and must be worked out between the student and the lecturer.

Top