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Academic Programmes > Graduate Studies > CSA-PhD Module Information

 
Cultural Studies in Asia | Chinese Studies | English Language & Literature | Geography | History |
Japanese Studies
 | Malay Studies | Philosophy | Communications & New Media | Sociology | 
Southeast Asian Studies
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY - ELECTIVES FOR CSA-PHD PROGRAMME
SC5209 Sociology of Everyday Life
Modular Credits 4
Workload 0-3-0-4-3
Prerequisite(s) Nil
Preclusion(s) Nil
Cross-listing(s) Nil
This module provides sociological ways of looking at a multitude of patterns of everyday life, ranging from talking, touching, feeling, using space, waiting, relating to members of the opposite sex, choosing clothing, to presenting images of oneself to others. A large part of the module will focus on everyday life through the understanding of processes of interaction, as well as the mutually transformative connections between social structures and everyday face-to-face encounters. Using existing sociological frameworks and case studies, it analyses the form and character of everyday life experiences of Singaporeans.
 
SC5219 Tourism: Culture, Society and the Environment
Modular Credits 4
Workload 0-3-0-4-3
Prerequisite(s) Nil
Preclusion(s) Nil
Cross-listing(s) Nil
Tourism is an important part of culture, society and the environment in the modern world. How have social scientists theorised about the role of tourism and its influence in the contemporary world? We will explore the history of the rise of tourism in the contemporary world and its rise as a type of "ordering" that is integrated with other social, political and economic changes of the modern world. What role does tourism have in the lives of people in industrial and post-industrial society? We will explore what it means to be a "tourist", and what being a tourist means in the social and culture life of contemporary society. What is touristic culture? How does tourism shape culture and nature in the contemporary world? What is eco-tourism? What is tourism's relationship with power, inequality and morality? This course will explore tourism as an important lens through which to understand our contemporary global situation.
 
SC5209 Sociology of Everyday Life
Modular Credits 4
Workload 0-3-0-4-3
Prerequisite(s) Nil
Preclusion(s) Nil
Cross-listing(s) Nil
This module provides sociological ways of looking at a multitude of patterns of everyday life, ranging from talking, touching, feeling, using space, waiting, relating to members of the opposite sex, choosing clothing, to presenting images of oneself to others. A large part of the module will focus on everyday life through the understanding of processes of interaction, as well as the mutually transformative connections between social structures and everyday face-to-face encounters. Using existing sociological frameworks and case studies, it analyses the form and character of everyday life experiences of Singaporeans.
 
SC6102 Sociological Theory
Modular Credits 4
Workload 0-3-0-4-3
Prerequisite(s) Nil
Preclusion(s) Nil
Cross-listing(s) Nil
Modern society is highly complex and differentiated. Sociological theories help us to make sense of this complexity, to understand and penetrate realities at all levels of social aggregation – at the micro-level of individual interaction and of small collective units (such as the family), at the meso-level of organizations and intermediate institutions (such as business firms) and at the macro-level of society’s basic structure. They enlighten us about hidden forces, principles and interests which shape our daily lives and the reproduction of social structures. This module aims to demonstrate the usefulness and limitations of different theories both as tools of analysis and as concrete guides to social practices.
 
SC6212 Global Transformation
Modular Credits 4
Workload 0-3-0-3-4
Prerequisite(s) Nil
Preclusion(s) Nil
Cross-listing(s) Nil
This module will examine the complexities and the challenges to global social order and peace. With global transformation and the emergence of an interdependent world society, there has been a proliferation of risks. From ecological crises to the intensification of poverty, social inequality and social exclusion to the conflicts and violence on ethnic and religious lines have made the world a risky place. Theories of globalisation will be applied to examine the social contexts and consequences of these crises, risks and violence. Globalisation will be viewed as a complex process of cultural clashes intersecting with modern economy and polity. Using an inter-disciplinary framework, the seminar will explore the possibilities of minimising risks and violence in a new global social order.
 
SC6214 Gender, Culture and Society
Modular Credits 4
Workload 0-3-0-4-3
Prerequisite(s) Nil
Preclusion(s) Nil
Cross-listing(s) Nil
This is a very advanced module which explores various societal domains in which gender plays a definitive role in structuring the way men and women interact, how it constrains or facilitates opportunities. The emphasis is on making sense of the production and reproduction of gender, gender inequalities and gender politics across a range of societal domains, its institutions and cultural practices - using insights from micro-sociological and macro-sociological theoretical perspectives. It is as crucial to adopt a critical approach towards the intellectual (including sociological) approach to theorizing gender, and the role of feminist theoretical positions in shifting the discourse and effecting concrete changes. The overall aim is to generate amongst students sophisticated and nuanced sociological understandings of how gender is understood in contemporary society, and how it intersects and interacts with race, class, political ideologies and sexuality.
 
SC6215 Religion In The Contemporary World
Modular Credits 4
Workload 0-3-0-4-3
Prerequisite(s) Nil
Preclusion(s) Nil
Cross-listing(s) Nil
This module investigates the importance of religion in the contemporary world, cross-culturally, relying on the most recent conceptual and methodological frameworks. Despite a focus on the present, a historical perspective is nonetheless necessary to ground analyses of religious phenomena in the contemporary world. The course explores the variety of socio-cultural, political, economic and technological forces and processes that impact the manifold expressions and manifestations of religion and vice-versa. This is facilitated by scrutinizing the ‘secularisation-sacralisation-resecularisation’ debates in the theoretical literature. The emphasis is not only empirical, but also theoretical in drawing together contributions on the subject from a variety of sociological and anthropological perspectives.
 
SC6216 The Anthropological Perspective
Modular Credits 4
Workload 0-3-0-4-3
Prerequisite(s) Nil
Preclusion(s) Nil
Cross-listing(s) Nil
This module will examine concepts that have been prominent in the development of anthropology as a distinctive discipline. Concepts such as culture, cultural relativism, ethnocentrism, ethnography, participant observation, and social structure, will be analysed in the context of their development and use by anthropologists over the past century. Other themes will include the historical relationship between anthropology and colonialism, critiques that have been made of anthropology in recent decades over questions of ethnographic authority, and the construction of anthropological objects and subjects.
 
SC6222 Topics in Transnationalism (formerly SC5222 Topics in Transnational Culture)
Modular Credits 4
Workload 0-3-0-4-3
Prerequisite(s) Nil
Preclusion(s) Nil
Cross-listing(s) Nil
Taking transnationalism as an empirical phenomenon as well as analytical perspective, this course will introduce to the students various recent theoretical debates that are characterised by their cross-nation scopes, and a wide range of research experiments that tackle these phenomena. We will ask: are the transnational connections and consciousness new? Do they simply represent a new stage of a long-standing trend of increasing international connections or are they something qualitatively different? Most importantly, what does transnationalism as a conceptual exercise reveal? By placing transnationalism in the larger historical context, this module teases out the complex relations between transnationalism and nationalism, the global and the local, institutional changes and personal experiences. The lecture will also discuss various methodological issues relating to global ethnography.