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Academic Programmes > Graduate Studies > CSA-PhD Module Information

 
Cultural Studies in Asia | Chinese Studies | English Language & Literature | Geography | History |
Japanese Studies
 | Malay Studies | Philosophy | Communications & New Media | Sociology | 
Southeast Asian Studies
DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE - ELECTIVES FOR CSA-PHD PROGRAMME
EL5253 Textual Construction of Knowledge
Modular Credits 4
Workload 0-3-0-0-7
Prerequisite(s) EL5265
Preclusion(s) Nil
Cross-listing(s) Nil
This module aims to cultivate an understanding both of the relationship between discourse and ideology and of the textual construction of knowledge. Students will be exposed to a critical deconstruction of different kinds of socio-political discourses (including discourses about gender and race, etc.) with specific attention to ideological positioning, and the role ideology plays in the knowledge construction process. Through this module, students will acquire critical skills in reading texts and come to appreciate the different kinds of textual and ideological strategies used in the formation of knowledge.
 
EL6882 Topics in Language and Society
Modular Credits 4
Workload 0-3-0-3-4
Prerequisite(s) Admission to the Ph.D. programme or doctoral competence in the discipline to be determind by the Department upon recommendation by the instructor
Preclusion(s) Nil
Cross-listing(s) Nil
This advanced seminar is especially useful for students who are considering pursuing research in the social aspects of language, including the politics of language and linguistic anthropology. Students are expected to identify for themselves key issues pertaining to the relationship between language and society. Among the possible topics discussed are: critical comparisons between autonomous and socially-oriented views of language; differences between variationist sociolinguistics and more critically-informed approaches; the relationship between linguistic structure, language ideology and power.
 
EN5231 Asian and Other Modernities
Modular Credits 4
Workload 0-3-0-3-4
Prerequisite(s) Must be registered as a Graduate student in the University or with the approval of the Department
Preclusion(s) Nil
Cross-listing(s) Nil
Over the last two hundred years, writers in Asia have often struggled with the question of modernity. Initially, indigenous or indigenized modernity offered a means of resisting colonialism and of asserting cultural autonomy; latterly, pan-Asian art forms have been proposed as a means of marking a distinctively Asian space within globaliSation. The module examines a number of comparative case studies of “modern” transcultural literary production. Through engagement with literary, historical, and theoretical issues, we will consider how notions of modernity might be applied to our primary texts, and how in turn the texts may interrogate or challenge theoretical models and constructs. This module is targeted at M.A. students.
 
EN5232 Ideological Approaches to Literature
Modular Credits 4
Workload 0-3-0-3-4
Prerequisite(s) Must be registered as a Graduate student in the University or with the approval of the Department
Preclusion(s) Nil
Cross-listing(s) Nil
An ideological approach to literature is one that reads not only the primary literature – it also reads the way we read literature. An inclusive statement about the necessity of such critical self-consciousness is Fredric Jameson’s “Metacommentary”, and this essay will guide our reflections on the study of the interrelations between primary literature, criticism and reviews, and tertiary critical engagements with the issues that arise when readers become increasingly self-conscious about the values in play during any act ofreading. This matter can be approached from a number of angles, and on its first run the course will concern American literary orientalism in the postwar period.
 
EN5234 The Postcolonial Novel in English
Modular Credits 4
Workload 0-3-0-3-4
Prerequisite(s) Must be registered as a Graduate student in the University or with the approval of the Department
Preclusion(s) Nil
Cross-listing(s) Nil
This module centers on the critical reading of selected anglophone postcolonial novels along with the questions they raise. Issues to be addressed include the articulation of postcolonial identity, postcolonial resistance and revisionism, the representation of history, the relation between postcolonialism and postmodernism. Postcolonial novelists to be studied may include Chinua Achebe, J. M. Coetzee, Wilson Harris, Jamaica Kincaid, George Lamming, V. S. Naipaul and Salman Rushdie. Some theoretical readings will be assigned though the emphasis will be on the close reading of primary texts. The module is designed especially for graduate students who want to read selected postcolonial novels in depth.
 
EN5252 Movies, Spectatorship and Subjectivity
Modular Credits 4
Workload 0-3-0-0-7
Prerequisite(s) Must be registered as a Graduate student in the University or with the approval of the Department
Preclusion(s) Nil
Cross-listing(s) Nil
This course involves a critical interrogation of key theoretical approaches addressing the study of film spectatorship and the ways in which subjectivity is constructed. This module adopts a specialized emphasis on that tradition of film theory associated with a psychoanalytical-textual-apparatus model and offers graduate students an opportunity to engage in in-depth explorations of the key problems and issues associated with this branch of film theory. In examining the highly complex interaction between spectator and text, students will also gain a greater understanding of the ways in which issues such as gender, identity, and ideology intersect with the cinematic/visual text.
 
EN6102 Advanced Critical Reading
Modular Credits 4
Workload 0-3-0-3-4
Prerequisite(s) Admission to the Ph.D. programme or doctoral competence in the discipline to be determind by the Department upon recommendation by the instructor
Preclusion(s) Nil
Cross-listing(s) Nil
This module is an advanced graduate class in critical reading. In it students develop three main areas of competence: 1) knowledge of different critical traditions; 2) awareness of the various problems of reading and interpretation; and 3) close reading of texts informed by the knowledge of (1) and the awareness of (2). In keeping with the advanced nature of the module, much of the responsibility for the direction of the work falls upon the students. Students will explore the texts of a few key thinkers and learn to understand some of the basic principles of critical theory. They will learn to apply specific reading strategies to selected texts and to raise questions about the reading process and its contexts. The emphasis throughout is on the development of students' critical awareness of positions, strategies and possibilities of interpretation. The module is a core course for ELL Department's research students.
 
TS5212 Asian International Cinema
Modular Credits 4
Workload 0-3-0-3-4
Prerequisite(s) Must be registered as a Graduate student in the University or with the approval of the Department
Preclusion(s) Nil
Cross-listing(s) Nil
In recent years, the vitality and currency of Asian cinema has resulted in texts that can no longer be viewed as merely artifacts of a particular culture or nation. This module looks at how film industries in Asia have engaged with global cinema through various forms of negotiations that assert, compromise or consume national, cultural or conventional distinctions. We assess the implications of a conglomerate Asian cinema by examining the current trend of transnational Asian films, the translatability of conventions and adaptability of ideas within Asia itself as well as between Asia and dominant cinemas like Hollywood.