Module Information

Level 1000 | Level 2000 | Level 3000 | Level 4000 | Graduate Modules

Level 4000

 
Module


Description


AY2013/2014
Semester I


AY2013/2014
Semester II


 SC4101


Reflections on a Sociological
Education (NEW)



Prof Chua Beng Huat


 SC4201


Contemporary Social Theory


Dr Misha Petrovic



 SC4202


Reading Ethnographies


Dr Emily Chua

 


 SC4206


Urban Anthropology


Dr Ho Swee Lin



 SC4209


Interpretive Sociology



A/P Daniel Goh


 SC4210


Sociology of Migration



Dr Kim Sung Kyung


 SC4212


Social Memory


A/P Roxana Waterson



 SC4217


Social Movements and Collective
Behaviour


Dr Adelyn Lim



 SC4218


Religions, Secularity, Post-Secularity



Dr Indira Arumugum


 SC4219


Social Origins & Consequences of
Financial Crises


Dr Jiwook Jung



 SC4220


Gender, Culture, Ageing

 


Dr Kim Ju Yeon


 SC4221


Comparative Analysis of Human Rights
Precludes SC4208A



Dr Leong Wai Teng


 SC4222


Body and Society
Precludes SC4208B



Dr Kelvin Low


 SC4223


Health and Social Behaviour
Precludes SC4214A



Dr Joonmo Son


 SC4225


The Sociology of Cities and Development
Planning in Asia



Prof Michael Douglass


 SC4226


Cultural Production: Power, Voice and Performance (NEW)


Dr Ivan Kwek



 SC4880A


Communication and Social Structure
(NEW)


Dr Leong Wai Teng



 SC4882A


Perspectives on State and Society
Precludes SC4215A


Dr Kurtulus Gemeci



 SC4882B


Citizenship, Nation and Globalisation
Precludes SC4215B



A/P Anne Raffin


 SC4883


Selected Topics in Law and Justice
Precludes SC4216


A/P Narayanan Ganapathy



 SC4401


Honours Thesis


To register for HT


To register for HT


 SC4660


Independent Study Module


To register for ISM


To register for ISM


 SC5101R


Graduate Research Methods


Dr Qiushi Feng



 SC5102R


Quantitative Data Analysis



Dr Vincent Chua


 SC5209R


Sociology of Everyday Life


A/P Vineeta Sinha



 SC5215R


The Practice of Visual Ethnography



Dr Charles Carroll


Fourth Year Advisor: A/P Anne Raffin


MODULE DESCRIPTIONS

SC4101 Reflections on a Sociological Education
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2006 and before: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules.
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

This module aims to provide honours students with a final opportunity to recollect, summarize and reorganise the disparate modules in their four years of studying sociology. The broad philosophical and pragmatic questions addressed in this course are: What is meant by thinking sociologically? How does one put sociologically framed analysis and subsequently knowledge derived to work at different scales in institutional operations and in personal life? In short, what does it mean to be a sociologist.
Note: The assessment for SC4101 Reflections on a Sociological Education is 100% CA, with no final examination.

SC4201 Contemporary Social Theory
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2006 and before: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules.
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

This module maps out the main currents of contemporary social theories ranging from the legacy of the classical tradition, comparative-historical sociology, interpretative sociology, functionalism and neo-functionalism, rational choice, globalization theories and the macro-micro debates. In exploring the nature and status of social scientific theories we deal with the universalism/relativism debate and link it to the problems of globalized vs. indigenized social theories. This module is mounted for Honours students with keen interest in social theories.

SC4202 Reading Ethnographies
Cohort 2006 and before: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules
Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80MC, including 28 MCs in Sociology modules or 28 MCs in Malay Studies modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

Ethnography (the description of a social context) involves both fieldwork, and writing about it - a process recently subject to intense debate and critique. We examine the tensions between fieldwork, the crafting of the text (the ethnography), and its reception within the discipline of anthropology. Following the `writing culture' debate, we aim to understand how ethnographers `construct' data, frame their analysis, and produce a text. We examine ethnographic `realism' as a style, how styles have changed over time, and how differently some researchers have written about the same culture area. The course will heighten students' critical skills and their awareness of how any representation of social reality has been put together.

SC4206 Urban Anthropology
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2006 and before: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules.
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

This module explores the approaches and issues of urban anthropology. It examines, among others, the task and relevance of anthropology; the semiotics of culture; the relationship between culture and events; structure, nature, and experience; and the challenges and opportunities facing anthropology in an urban context. This module is mounted for students interested in using anthropology to understand social life in cities.

SC4209 Interpretive Sociology
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2006 and before: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules.
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

This is a methodology module which examines the various approaches to doing sociological interpretation. The methodological texts of major theorists form the reading material. The theorists studied include: Durkhiem, Weber, Foucault, Barthes, Freud and Habermas. The approaches to be examined include inter-subjective understanding, discursive analysis, semiotics, elements of psychoanalysis and Critical Theory. The aim of the module is to prepare Honours students for the analysis of qualitative and textual data for their research projects, therefore, it will use students' research topics as substantive illustrations of the appropriateness of the different approaches.

SC4210 Sociology of Migration
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2006 and before: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules.
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

This module deals with the main contemporary issues and problems that have their roots in migration and its consequences at the individual, societal, and global level. It will focus on the following issues and processes: the migratory process and the formation of ethnic groups; postwar migration patterns, the globalization of international migration; new migration in the Asia-Pacific; migrants and minorities in the labour force; the migratory process: Singapore, Malaysia and Brunei compared; new ethnic minorities and society; immigration policies and politics; and migration in the New World order. This module is mounted for students with interest in human migration and its implications.

SC4212 Social Memory
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2006 and before: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules.
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

This module examines new studies on memory as a social phenomenon. Not just for individuals, but for all kinds of social groups, memory is an indissoluble part of identity. Remembering is always a selective reconstruction, hence always political. ‘Popular’ (often oral) memory interacts with ‘official’ history, while itself containing differences relating to generation, class, gender and ethnicity. Memories of traumatic events of the C20th shape our moral universe and are driving developments in international human rights law. Our explorations of the politics of memory will be grounded in case studies of both regional and global relevance.

SC4217 Social Movements and Collective Behaviour
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2006 and before: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules.
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

The course focuses on developing a framework for constructing and rethinking factors (be they economic, political, cultural) that have led to the emergence, development, and maintenance of certain forms of collective behaviour. It will also examine these theories through various case studies of social movements such as historical revolutions, and the "new" social movements of Europe. Topics covered include the rationality of collective action; history of social movement theory; the role of individuals, social groups and institutions in social movements; and their impacts. This module is mounted for students with interest in social movements.

SC4218 Religions, Secularity, Post Secularity
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2006 and before: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules.
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

This module is designed to develop a nuanced understanding of forms of religiosity in the present. One aim of the module is to explore connections between the realms of religion and politics, particularly within the framework of secular states. The module examines the notions of 'secularity' and 'post-secularity' and queries their relevance for the contemporary moment, within a comparative, historical perspective. Is it useful to invoke the concept of 'secularism' to make sense of encounters between religious and political domains. Do the ideas of the 'separation of church and state' and 'state non-interference in religion' help in these efforts?

SC4219 Social Origins & Consequences of Financial Crises
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2006 and before: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules.
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

This module is an introduction to the study of the causes and consequences of financial crises from a sociological perspective. The module will introduce students to major episodes of financial crises in history, with particular emphasis on crises in emerging and developing countries since the 1970s, the Great Depression, and the financial collapse of 2007-09. The focus of the module is in delineating the causal connections among inequality, class politics, accumulation patterns, the ascent of finance, globalization, and financial crises. The module surveys how financial crises affect domestic and international politics.

SC4220 Gender, Culture and Ageing
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2006 and before: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules.
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

This module explores the intersection of ageing, gender, and culture, how people experience ageing, and how society views ageing differently across gender and culture. The social stratification accumulated throughout one’s life course results in extensive diversity in old age experiences. Men and women experience ageing differently vis-à-vis family relationships and economic status. The social status of old age varies between Asian societies where filial piety holds strong, and Western societies where youth is equated with beauty and productivity. This module delineates the diversity of experiences and explores the causes and consequences of social stratification by employing critical theories on ageing.

SC4221 Comparative Analysis of Human Rights (Precludes SC4208A)
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2006 and before: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules.
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

Human rights are one of the most globalised, yet often vigorously contested, political values of our time. This course takes a critical and empirical approach and focuses on the following human rights issues: the ontology of being human; relativist versus universalist positions on human rights issues: the ontology of being human; empirical case studies of human rights violations associated with ethnic conflict and civil war; women’s rights; the rights of children; transnational capital, development and local community/ indigenous rights; and human rights, the state and the international system. This module is mounted for students throughout NUS with interest in human rights.

SC4222 Body and Society (Precludes SC4208B)
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2006 and before: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules.
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

This is a course that surveys the enormous intellectual growth of studies of the human body in sociology, anthropology and other social science disciplines. It will focus on the diverse social meanings of the body situated within a range of social contexts. Sociocultural notions of the body are examined through analyses of corporeal experiences in relation to religion, the senses, health, spectacles, commodification, technology, and other substantive dimensions.

SC4223 Health and Social Behaviour (Precludes SC4214A)
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2006 and before: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules.
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

The module explores interactions between a variety of social forces and the phenomenon of health/illness. First, an important goal of the module is to clarify the extent to which mental and physical health/illness have been socially constructed and unevenly distributed in society. The module further identifies the effects of such social conditions as socioeconomic status, education, gender, and social networks on patterns of health inequality. Finally, it delves into specific issues like social epidemiology, stress process, and health care where possible causal relationships between a variety of social forces and health/illness are explored.

SC4225 The Sociology of Cities and Development Planning in Asia
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2006 and before: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules.
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

This module covers the sociology of urban development planning in Asia at local, regional and global scales. We will assess the livability of cities: which includes looking at social lifeworlds, poverty, and the environment. We will discuss rural‐urban linkages and transitions, uneven spatial development, peri‐urban development and transborder intercity networks. Additionally we will explore national experiences in East, Southeast Asia and South Asia. This course is designed as a gateway for professional careers in applied research for urban planning.

SC4226 Cultural Production: Power, Voice and Performance
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2006 and before: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules.
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

This module considers cultural production as an arena of contestation for voice and visibility. It explores how creative performances and productions have been used to express, subvert, or redefine social realities and values, constitute publics, and initiate change. A variety of forms, such as street theatres, music, cartoons, community and online media, will be explored through an anthropological engagement with the everyday politics of recognition, narration, belonging, and indeed the valuation of one’s voice. Power, performance, agency, creativity, audiences, art worlds and aesthetics are among the key concepts explored.

SC4880A Communication and Social Structure
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2006 and before: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules.
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

This course analyzes the links between social structure and popular forms of communication like rumor, gossip and humor. How do group formation and social hierarchies facilitate rumor, gossip and humor? In turn, how do rumor, gossip and humor reflect social inequality, socio-political values, dynamics of conflict, and organizational environments? How do cultural forms of communication (satire, parody, irony, camp) underscore gender, ethnic, religious, political and national divisions? What constitutes the offensive, the derogatory, the taboo? What is the impact of hate humor on social life in regard to free speech, artistic expression and social order?

SC4882A Pespectives on State and Society (Precludes SC4215A)
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2006 and before: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules.
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

What is the impact of globalization on the state, and how can we come to terms with these two concepts? What is the future form of state-society relations, and do concepts such as democracy, civil society, national identity and rethinking as we move into a highly connected world? Using cases from around the globe, students will be exposed to the very broad perspective offered by comparative and historical analysis. The course will initiate thinking about social welfare options and citizenship in a globalized world. Through historical and comparative analyses, critical questions about the role of the state in welfare provisions, economic development, and democratic development will be examined. This module is mounted for students throughout NUS with interest in the state-society relationship.

SC4882B Citizenship, Nation & Globalisation (Precludes SC4215B)
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2006 and before: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules.
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

The concept of citizenship has been understood as the mechanisms through which the individual is linked to the nation, involving a variety of processes, such as rights, culture, or race. There are new claims that with globalization, there has been the re-definition of the idea of the citizenship and the nation, leading to new concepts such as flexible citizenship and de-territorialized nation-states. This course will examine how that movement of people, capital, and ideas are affecting citizenship, and how this affects the relation between state and society. This module is mounted for students throughout NUS with interest in the concept of citizenship.

SC4883 Selected Topics in Law and Justice (Precludes SC4216)
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2006 and before: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules.
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80MCs of which 28MCs must be in Sociology modules, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

This module aims to increase students' breadth of empirical knowledge and the depth of their theoretical understanding on issues of law, justice and society. With urbanization and industrialization, modern societies have increasingly depended upon law to regulate the behaviour of its members and the activities of its institutions. In contemporary Singapore society, law underpins social policies from housing to marriage, political behaviour and economic activities. Among the wide variety of significant topics are policing theories, state violence and social justice, crime and punishment to the legal profession. This module is mounted for students with interest in law and justice.

SC4401 Honours Thesis [15 modular credits]
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2006 and before: Completed at least 100 MCs, including 56 MCs in the major requirement, and obtain either:
(a) minimum CAP of 4.0 or
(b) minimum SJAP of 4.0 and CAP of 3.5
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed at least 110 MCs, including 60 MCs in the major requirement, with a minimum SJAP of 4.0 and CAP of 3.5
This module requires students to conduct an independent research project on an approved topic under the supervision of an academic staff. The research project, which usually includes some fieldwork, will be submitted as an Honours Thesis.

SC4660 Independent Study Module
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2006 and before:
1. Completed at least 100 MCs, including 56 MCs of major requirements and
2. Obtained a minimum CAP of 3.2 at point of registration.
Pre-requisite for Cohort 2007 onwards:
1. Completed at least 100 MCs, including 60 MCs of major requirements and
2. Obtain a minimum CAP of 3.5 at point of registration.
Preclusion(s): SC4401

The Independent Study Module is designed to enable the student to explore an approved topic within the discipline in depth. The student should approach a lecturer to work out an agreed topic, readings, and assignments for the module. A formal, written agreement is to be drawn up, giving a clear account of the topic, programme of study, assignments, evaluation, and other pertinent details. Head’s and/or Honours Coordinator’s approval of the written agreement is required. Regular meetings and reports are expected. Evaluation is based on 100% Continuous Assessment and must be worked out between the student and the lecturer prior to seeking departmental approval.

The following Graduate Modules are also available to be read by Sociology Honours students.
Please refer to the Graduate Module Information page for the module descriptions. Registration may be done manually by filling in a form at the Sociology General Office during the CORS period. Please note that there are limited vacancies for Honours students.

SC5101R Graduate Research Methods
SC5102R Quantitative Data Analysis
SC5209R Sociology of Everday Life
SC5215R The Practice of Visual Ethnography

 

Note:
Students will move on to the Honours track directly upon fulfilling ALL of the following criteria:

    1. Complete at least 110 MCs including 60 MCs of major requirements
    2. Obtain a minimum CAP of 3.5

For more information on Honours requirements, visit the FASS website.